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I am reading book of CSS3 in that, came across with one word "CSS Polymorphism". I have heard first time "CSS Polymorphism". Searching on Google but not find much.

My Questions:

  1. What is CSS Polymorphism?
  2. How to use in css explain with examples?
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think this is a generally accepted term, but it appears to be used a couple of times in the context of properties. Different CSS properties accept different values.

Polymorphism is defined (by Dictionary.com) as:

The occurrence of something in different forms, in particular.

In the case of CSS, individual properties can affect their target in a multitude of ways:

background:#fff; /* The background is white */
background:url(img.png); /* The background is an image */
background:#fff url(img.png); /* The background is white with an image */
background:url(img.png) no-repeat; /* The background is a non-repeating image */
/* Etc... */

This is polymorphism.

Pro HTML5 and CSS Design Patterns describes CSS polymorphism (in relation to properties) as a "combinatorial explosion of possibilities".

share|improve this answer
    
i am started reading Pro HTML5 and CSS Design Patterns & i find that "CSS Polymorphism" word. – Tony Stark May 21 '13 at 9:10
    
Well the excerpt I linked to (from that book) does state that the author defines CSS Polymorphism; it's more used in the context of the book rather than an accepted standard piece of CSS terminology. – James Donnelly May 21 '13 at 9:12
    
Yes you are right but they not explain much in book. – Tony Stark May 21 '13 at 9:14
    
+1 i understand & clear much with your answer. Fully Satisfied!!! – Tony Stark May 21 '13 at 9:19

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