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I need to read a file and split it into lines, and also split those lines in half by tab characters, as well as getting rid of all speech marks. At the moment I have a working function. However, it is rather slow:

temp = []
fp = open(fName, "r")
for line in fp:
    temp.append(line.replace("\"","").rstrip("\n").split("\t"))
print temp

This splits the file into a list of lists. It could really just be one list, as it would be pretty easy to redivide it into pairs later as long as the order was retained.

There must be a faster way of doing this. Could anyone put me on the right track?

Thank you!

[edit] The file I'm working with is massive, but I'll add something like it. (Is there a way to upload files on stack overflow?)

"CARMILLA"  "35"
"JONATHAN R"    "AA2"
"M" "3"
"EMMA"  "350"
"OLD"   "AA"

should return:

["CARMILLA", "35", "JONATHON R", "AA2", "M", "3", "EMMA", "350", "OLD", "AA"]

Although my code returns it as a list of lists of 2 strings, which is also fine.

Sorry, I should probably have noted that the print statement is standing in for a return statement - since I took this out of a function I changed it to print so it would make more sense here.

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2  
a sample file and output would help us create answers (for testing) –  HennyH May 21 '13 at 8:55
    
For sure, I'll add one. –  false_azure May 21 '13 at 8:57
    
If all you want is a printed output, you could just print in your for loop instead of appending to the list. –  Gurgeh May 21 '13 at 8:59
    
Are you looking for csv? But I'm not sure about the performance. –  neuront May 21 '13 at 9:00
1  
On what are you basing your assumption that reading and splitting is "rather slow"? How did you measure it? –  interjay May 21 '13 at 9:05

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would think a list comprehension would be faster than calling .append for each line

from itertools import chain
with open('file.txt') as f:
    lines = chain.from_iterable([l.replace(r'"','').rstrip('\n').split('\t',1) for l in f])

EDIT: so it produces a flattened list

>>> 
['CARMILLA', '35', 'JONATHAN R', 'AA2', 'M', '3', 'EMMA', '350', 'OLD', 'AA']

The non-flattening version:

with open('file.txt') as f:
    lines = [l.replace(r'"','').rstrip('\n').split('\t',1) for l in f]

And some timeing, turns out OP's is the fastest?

import timeit
print("chain, list",timeit.timeit(r"""
with open('file.txt') as f:
    lines = chain.from_iterable([l.replace(r'"','').rstrip('\n').split('\t',1) for l in f])""",setup="from itertools import chain",number=1000))
print("flat       ",timeit.timeit(r"""
with open('file.txt') as f:
    lines = [l.replace(r'"','').rstrip('\n').split('\t',1) for l in f]""",setup="from itertools import chain",number=1000))
print("op's       ",timeit.timeit(r"""temp = []
fp = open('file.txt', "r")
for line in fp:
    temp.append(line.replace("\"","").rstrip("\n").split("\t"))
""",number=1000))
print("jamlyks    ",timeit.timeit(r"""
with open('file.txt', 'rb') as f:
    r = csv.reader(f, delimiter=' ', skipinitialspace=True)
    list(chain.from_iterable(r))""",setup="from itertools import chain; import csv",number=1000))
print("lennart    ",timeit.timeit(r"""
    list(csv.reader(open('file.txt'), delimiter='\t', quotechar='"'))""",setup="from itertools import chain; import csv",number=1000))

Yields

C:\Users\Henry\Desktop>k.py
('chain, list', 0.04725674146159321)
('my flat    ', 0.04629905135295972)
("op's       ", 0.04391255644624917)
('jamlyks    ', 0.048360870934994915)
('lennart    ', 0.04569112379085424)
share|improve this answer
    
Much appreciated, thanks! –  false_azure May 21 '13 at 9:13
1  
chain.from_iterable and a generator expression saves you some punctuation - lines = chain.from_iterable(l.replace('"', '')... for l in f). Also, no need to use a raw string - it doesn't make any difference to a string that doesn't have a ``. –  lvc May 21 '13 at 9:17
2  
from my benchmarks this appears slower –  robert king May 21 '13 at 9:26
2  
chain returns an iterator. list() around it would make a list. –  Janne Karila May 21 '13 at 9:26

By replacing temp.append with temp.extend, you get a single layer list instead of a list of list.

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I wanted to post this just as a comment but don't have the privilege required. –  chenaren May 21 '13 at 9:02
    
i will give you this privileges –  Zagorulkin Dmitry May 21 '13 at 9:07
    
Thanks, I'll give it a go. –  false_azure May 21 '13 at 9:09

If you know there is only one \t on each line, you can use split("\t",1) or rsplit("\t",1) to avoid scanning the entire line for tabs.

strip('"') after split is a possible alternative to replace("\"","") before split. Try if it faster.

But have you timed how long it takes only to read the file using file.read()? Is the time spent in splitting really significant compared to that?

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Thanks! Should have read the documentation; I didn't even know you could do this. –  false_azure May 21 '13 at 9:10
    
That's a good point, thanks. Perhaps the splitting isn't my problem. –  false_azure May 21 '13 at 9:16

Like this, for example:

>>> import csv
>>> reader = csv.reader(open('testfile'), delimiter='\t', quotechar='"')
>>> list(reader)
[['CARMILLA', '35'], ['JONATHAN R', 'AA2'], ['M', '3'], ['EMMA', '350'], ['OLD', 'AA']]
share|improve this answer
    
it needs to be flattened –  HennyH May 21 '13 at 9:35
    
@HennyH: Quoting the OP: "Although my code returns it as a list of lists of 2 strings, which is also fine." So no, it doesn't need to be flattened. –  Lennart Regebro May 21 '13 at 9:35

You should first figure out what's your real bottleneck. Just read the file without building the result list. Just print each line when it's splitted, but not to the console (with is slow) but into a new file. I would take very bet that it is already WAY faster. So in my opinion (cannot test without real day) your problem is not the reading and splitting part. It's what you are doing afterwards. Give it a try. How to optimize further depends on your exact use case.

Update:

Given your example data, you might try this one:

import itertools
print list(itertools.chain(
    *( line.strip().split('\t') for line in file('sample.txt') )
))

It's generating a generator for your data. The print list(...) is just for printing and to be consistent with your example. In a real world app you would probably not create the list. Instead write the data to where it should go or process it any further.

Update2:

If you want to get rid of the quotes and you're SURE that each part has the quotes, you could just use x[1:-1]. Or you could use x.strip('"'), if you want to be sure. But no need to use regex.

share|improve this answer
from itertools import chain
import csv

with open('data.txt', 'rb') as f:
    r = csv.reader(f, delimiter=' ', skipinitialspace=True)
    print list(chain.from_iterable(r))

['CARMILLA', '35', 'JONATHAN R', 'AA2', 'M', '3', 'EMMA', '350', 'OLD', 'AA']
share|improve this answer
Benchmarks on a 2mb file:

__author__ = 'robert'

from timeit import timeit

os_cached = open("data.csv").read()


def test_one():
    result = [line.split("\t") for line in open("data.csv").read().splitlines()]

def test_two():
    for line in open("data.csv"):
        line.split("\t")
        yield line

def test_three():
    for line in open("data.csv").read().splitlines():
        line.split("\t")
        yield line

  def test_four():
    from itertools import chain
    with open('data.csv') as f:
        lines = chain.from_iterable([l.replace(r'"','').rstrip('\n').split('\t',1) for l in f])
        return lines

print timeit("test_one()", setup="from __main__ import test_one", number=195)
print timeit("for line in test_two(): pass", setup="from __main__ import test_two", number=195)
print timeit("for line in test_three(): pass", setup="from __main__ import test_three", number=195)
print timeit("for line in test_four(): pass", setup="from __main__ import test_four", number=195)



7.34187420441
6.22663840184
6.60748983698
10.6207058679
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4  
splitlines() will create the whole list in memory first, not memory efficient. –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 21 '13 at 9:06
    
You would have to build a complete list in memory, which takes time and ... consumes a lot of memory. Why should it be faster? –  Achim May 21 '13 at 9:07
    
currently he is appending it to a list and printing out the list. –  robert king May 21 '13 at 9:07
    
I'll do some bench marks. Last time I checked it was the fastest –  robert king May 21 '13 at 9:07
    
benchmarks are up - it's only slightly faster –  robert king May 21 '13 at 9:15

Using regex and list comprehension:

import re
with open("abc") as f:
    lis = [x.group(1) for line in f for x in \
                             re.finditer(r'"([a-zA-Z0-9\s]+)"', line) ]
    print lis

output:

['CARMILLA', '35', 'JONATHAN R', 'AA2', 'M', '3', 'EMMA', '350', 'OLD', 'AA']

If the number of tab separated values are not huge, then use re.findall():

lis =  [y for line in f for y in re.findall(r'"([a-zA-Z0-9\s]+)"', line)]

or using itertools.chain:

lis =  list(chain(*(re.findall(r'"([a-zA-Z0-9\s]+)"', line) for line in f)))
share|improve this answer
    
If you are going to consume the whole iterator, the list version re.findall will be faster –  jamylak May 21 '13 at 9:19
    
@jamylak Yes it is, but it'll create the whole list in memory first. –  Ashwini Chaudhary May 21 '13 at 9:22
    
Yeah but the lines are short, this will just introduce a lot of overhead –  jamylak May 21 '13 at 9:23

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