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When we have an object hierarchy that is purely a inheritance of semantic and not of behaviors,then inevitably we need to write "instanceof" or "if/else" everywhere to do run time type checking.

E.g.

If I have a object hierarchy which has

Class Function

Class Average extends Function

Class Sum extends Function

Class Max extends Function

If there is a method called calculate() in these classes, then we do not have problem, we can just take the advantage of polymorphism and this design satisfies the LSP.

However what if we do not want to add this calculate() method to this hierarchy for some reason, these objects are purely plain object stateless objects just represent the semantic.

Then we are forced to write the following code everywhere :

if (function instanceof Average)
//perform average
else if(function instanceof Sum)
//perform sum
else if(function instanceof Max)
//perform max

The code above indicates a bad design, because you write this code everywhere and this design is fragile and is hard to change later on. I guess if the number functions are limited and the calculation of function are in a single place this perhaps is ok depends on the complexity.

What I've known so far is that to solve above approach, the only possible way is to implement a visitor pattern, is there any other way to solve the above design apart from using visitor pattern?

One problem I can see from visitor pattern is that visitor pattern's accept method does not return value, this is not convenient sometime if the accept() method doesn't fully satisfy the requirement.

share|improve this question
    
what about the strategy pattern: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern ? – Marco Forberg May 21 '13 at 8:59
    
don't think strategy will work, please check my comments below – grumpynerd May 21 '13 at 9:08
    
hmmm okay. But if those if-elseif-else blocks are everywhere in your project it might work to refactor that block out into a separate utility method – Marco Forberg May 21 '13 at 9:19
    
So looks like there is no easy way to implement a better design for this ? and if/else branching is inevitable? – grumpynerd May 21 '13 at 12:11
    
looks like it as long as your stuck with this unless you can change the code of you Function class – Marco Forberg May 21 '13 at 12:13

If you still know the types at compile time you can use a helper class:

class Function {
}

class Average extends Function {
}

class Sum extends Function {
}

class Max extends Function {
}

class FunctionHelper {
  public Number calculate(Average a) {
    return null;
  }

  public Number calculate(Sum s) {
    return null;
  }

  public Number calculate(Max a) {
    return null;
  }

  public Number calculate(Function a) {
    return null;
  }

}

Generally you'd make the helper methods static but you are not restricted to that - there are some rather interesting things you can do with multiple flavours of helper class.

share|improve this answer
1  
That is a bit of a dangerous approach, as it relies on compile-time dispatch. And what is the last method (with Function) going to do other than the same instanceof we want to avoid. – Thilo May 21 '13 at 9:16
    
@Thilo - I wouldn't call it dangerous - I did note that you must know the types at compile time. The last Function implementation is the equivalent of a default, perhaps it will return 0;. – OldCurmudgeon May 21 '13 at 9:18
    
So this will return 0: Function x = new Sum(); calculate(x); and this will not: Sum x = new Sum(); calculate(x); . – Thilo May 21 '13 at 9:21
    
@Thilo - correct. And thus my comment If you still know the types at compile time... – OldCurmudgeon May 21 '13 at 9:23
1  
If you have that kind of compile-time coupling, you don't need any marker objects at all. You can just have a method calculate_sum() and a method calculate_max(). The only reason I can see for these Function objects (that don't have state or behaviour) is to be able to switch on them at runtime. – Thilo May 21 '13 at 9:24

these objects are purely plain object stateless objects just represent the semantic.

Sounds like you want to use enums then instead of regular objects.

Then you can use switch statements and have the compiler check that you handled all cases.

enum Function { Average, Sum, Max }
share|improve this answer
    
In my opinion it doesn't solve a problem since you still need to perform switching and it is highly unscaleable. – Michal Borek May 21 '13 at 9:11
    
@MichalBorek: Without any methods on the Functions, how are you going to avoid switching? – Thilo May 21 '13 at 9:17
    
You could also add calculate methods to the enums. – OldCurmudgeon May 21 '13 at 9:21
    
yes. But OP does not want methods (for some unknown reason). And if method obviate switching (which they should), there is no more need for enums. – Thilo May 21 '13 at 9:22

i just stumbled over the Chain of Responsibilty pattern which might solve your Problem:

For this we create a handler class for every Function starting with a common base class

public abstract class FunctionHandler {
    private FunctionHandler nexthandler = null;

    protected abstract boolean isConditionMet(Function function);

    protected abstract void calculate(Function function);

    public void handleFunction(Function function) {
        if(function == null) {
            return;
        }

        if (isConditionMet(function)) {
            calculate(function);
        } else {
            if (nexthandler != null) {
                nexthandler.handleFunction(function);
            }
        }
    }

    public FunctionHandler setNexthandler(FunctionHandler nexthandler) {
        this.nexthandler = nexthandler;
        return nexthandler;
    }
}

next we create the concrete handlers:

public class Averagehandler extends FunctionHandler {
    @Override
    protected boolean isConditionMet(Function function) {
        return function instanceof Average;
    }

    @Override
    protected void calculate(Function function) {
        // do average stuff
    }
}

public class SumHandler extends FunctionHandler {
    @Override
    protected boolean isConditionMet(Function function) {
        return function instanceof Sum;
    }

    @Override
    protected void calculate(Function function) {
        // do sum stuff
    }
}

public class MaxHandler extends FunctionHandler {
    @Override
    protected boolean isConditionMet(Function function) {
        return function instanceof Max;
    }

    @Override
    protected void calculate(Function function) {
        // do max stuff
    }
}

now look for a nice central place to put your chain together (e.g. a utility class)

public final class FunctionUtil {
    public static final FunctionHandler HANDLER;

    static {
        HANDLER = new Averagehandler();
        HANDLER.setNexthandler(new SumHandler()).setNexthandler(new MaxHandler());
    }
}

now you can start replacing your if-else-blocks with calls to FunctionUtil.HANDLER.handleFunction(function);

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, Macro, however, I just looked at your suggestion, I couldn't quite understand why we need to introduce the chain of responsibility to this problem? Isn't just using each handler object to handle each function enough ? E.g. I was thinking it would be something like this if using this kind of approach – grumpynerd Jun 11 '13 at 9:38
    
a single handler would be enough. the chain of responsibility frees you from the decision which handler is the right for the Function object at hand. it simply takes the object and passes it to the handlers unless one is the right to handle the actual type of function – Marco Forberg Jun 11 '13 at 9:43

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