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I am currently trying to solve a complex problem with MySQL and PHP.

Here is an example of the tables I have:

List of clients:

table_clients
Client_ID | Client_Name | Address         | Zip Code |
----------|-------------|-----------------|----------|
1         | Mark        | 127 Park Ave    | 12235    |
2         | John        | 6 Freeman Drive | 12899    |
3         | Allan       | 450 Clever Rd   | 12235    |

List of services:

table_services
Service_ID | Service_Name | Service_Price |
-----------|--------------|---------------|
1          | Fertilizer   | 100.00        |
2          | Bug Spray    | 50.00         |
3          | Seeds        | 20.00         |

Next table stores which client has which services (one or more), the status of the service and the date it was done, if applicable:

table_jobs
Job_ID | Client_ID | Service_ID | Status | Date_Done  |
-------|-----------|------------|--------|------------|
1      | 1         | 1          | done   | 2013-05-01 |
2      | 1         | 3          | active | NULL       |
3      | 2         | 1          | active | NULL       |
4      | 2         | 2          | active | NULL       |
5      | 3         | 1          | active | NULL       |
6      | 3         | 3          | active | NULL       |

Now comes the tricky part. Some services need to have a certain time difference with others. For example, one client can't receive seeds if he received fertilizer in the last 30 days. To keep track of this, I have a third table with the information:

table_time_difference
Service_ID_1 | Service_ID_2 | Time_Diff |
-------------|--------------|-----------|
1            | 3            | 30d       |
1            | 4            | 7d        |
2            | 4            | 14d       |
4            | 5            | 14d       |

Now that everything is stored in database (keep in mind there can be dozens of services and thousands of clients), I am trying to get the rows of clients that have certain services or not, while always respecting the time difference.

For example:

I want all the client that are due to receive Fertilizer, should return:

Client_ID | Client_Name | Zip Code | Job_ID | Service_ID | Service_Name |
----------|-------------|----------|--------|------------|--------------|
2         | John        | 12235    | 3      | 1          | Fertilizer   |
3         | Allan       | 12145    | 5      | 1          | Fertilizer   |

Now if I want to do all clients that are due to receive Fertilizer AND Bug Spray:

Client_ID | Client_Name | Zip Code | Job_ID | Service_ID | Service_Name |
----------|-------------|----------|--------|------------|--------------|
2         | John        | 12235    | 3      | 1          | Fertilizer   |
2         | John        | 12235    | 4      | 2          | Bug Spray    |

And if I want to do all clients that are due to receive seeds in ZIP code 12235:

Client_ID | Client_Name | Zip Code | Job_ID | Service_ID | Service_Name |
----------|-------------|----------|--------|------------|--------------|
3         | Allan       | 12235    | 6      | 3          | Fertilizer   |

Notice how Mark isn't included as he doesn't meet the 30 days requirements since the last fertilizer service.

I have tried many different options with all sorts of JOINS, but never found a solution that would work like described. The closest I have gotten is by generating sub-queries with PHP and them joining them in a big query.

For example, one of my attempts looked like this (for the last expected result above):

SELECT c.Client_ID,
       c.Client_Name,
       c.Zip_Code,
       j.Job_ID,
       s.Service_ID,
       s.Service_Name
FROM clients c
LEFT JOIN jobs j
    ON j.Client_ID = c.Client_ID
LEFT JOIN services s
    ON s.Service_ID = j.Service_ID
WHERE s.Service_ID = "1"
   && c.Zip_Code = "12235"
   && c.Client_ID NOT IN (
                          SELECT Client_ID
                          FROM jobs
                          WHERE Status = "done"
                             && Date_Done < (UNIX_TIMESTAMP() - 2592000)
                         )
  • Note that the subquery has been generated by a PHP script that does a lookup for restrictions corresponding to the service requested and the minimum time difference for that service since there can be multiple restriction for the same service and I don't know if I can do that in pure SQL.

Now, the query shown above does work for that exact scenario (Although it is very slow), it breaks and I haven't been able to adapt it to fit my other needs (Multiple services that are included or excluded).

Tell me if you need any other information or if you are open to discussing it further.

Thank you very much to everyone who has read through the whole question (very long) and I hope that some of you understand my needs and can help me!

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What is the data type of your table_time_difference.Time_Diff column? Do you really have a literal 30d in your query? Doesn't the parser bemoan an unknown column? –  eggyal May 21 '13 at 10:25
    
The Time_Diff stores the required time difference in seconds, I wrote 30d for simplicity, sorry if it is confusing. –  khaosRyder May 21 '13 at 21:32
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2 Answers

The following may be of help:

This will pull the outstanding orders (without restrictions)

SELECT *
FROM table_jobs AS T_job, table_services AS T_ser, table_clients AS T_cli
WHERE T_job.Client_ID=T_cli.Client_ID
AND T_job.Service_ID=T_ser.Service_ID
AND T_job.Status='active'

This should pull order that have previously done orders with restrictions BUT Time_Diff should be in Days (ie remove the d)

SELECT *
FROM (table_jobs AS T_job, table_services AS T_ser, table_clients AS T_cli)
LEFT JOIN (table_time_difference AS T_dif, table_jobs AS T_ojobs)
ON (
    AND T_job.Service_ID=T_dif.Service_ID_1
    AND T_dif.Service_ID_2=T_ojob.Service_ID
    AND T_ojobs.Date_Done > DATE_SUB(CURDATE(), INTERVAL T_dif.Time_Diff DAY)
    AND T_ojobs.Status='done'
)
WHERE T_job.Client_ID=T_cli.Client_ID
AND T_job.Service_ID=T_ser.Service_ID
AND T_job.Status='active'
AND T_ojobs.Job_ID IS NULL

You can then add your additional parameters for bug spray or zip code at the end, using T_job, T_ser or T_cli as the table names. (ie not T_ojobs or T_dif)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Unfortunately, it is returning zero rows as it is. I think I might be starting to understand how to solve the problem with your idea. I will update with my findings. –  khaosRyder May 21 '13 at 23:11
    
I've made some progress. Does your ON clause take into account that the service that is done has to have been done for the same client? I would think that as it is written, it would match any row that are done and meet the time requirement. –  khaosRyder May 22 '13 at 0:09
    
I've been able correct some syntax error on your answer and use that idea to build the query I needed. See my answer for details. Thanks a lot! –  khaosRyder May 22 '13 at 5:52
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have found the answer to my question, thanks to the help of Waygood who helped me understand the different uses of the ON clause of the LEFT JOIN.

Here is the query that fulfils all the needs I enumerated:

# Select desired columns

SELECT j.`Job_ID`,
       j.`Client_ID`,
       c.`Name`,
       j.`Service_ID`,
       s.`Service_Name`,
FROM (
      jobs j,
      clients c,
      Services s
      )

# Use LEFT JOIN to filter out services that meet the constraints

LEFT JOIN (
           time_difference diff,
           jobs j2
          )
ON (
    j.`Service_ID` = diff.`Service_ID_1`
    && j.`Client_ID` = j2.`Client_ID`
    && diff.`Service_ID_2` = j2.`Service_ID`
    && j2.`Date_Done` > (UNIX_TIMESTAMP() - diff.`Time_Diff`)
    && j2.`Status` = 'done'
)

# Use LEFT JOIN to filter out jobs that have specific restrictions

LEFT JOIN jobs_constraints jconst
ON (
    j.`id` = jconst.`Job_ID`
    && jconst.`value` > UNIX_TIMESTAMP()
)

#Add one LEFT JOIN for every service that a client must or must not have

LEFT JOIN jobs j3
ON (
    j.`Client_ID` = j3.`Client_ID`
    && j3.`Status` = "active"
    && j3.`Service_ID` = "1"
)
LEFT JOIN jobs j4
ON (
    j.`Client_ID` = j4.`Client_ID`
    && j4.`Status` = "active"
    && j4.`Service_ID` = "2"
)
LEFT JOIN jobs j5
ON (
    j.`Client_ID` = j5.`Client_ID`
    && j5.`Status` = "active"
    && j5.`Service_ID` = "3"
)

# END automatically generated blocks

WHERE j.`Status` = "active"
   && j2.`Job_ID` IS NULL
   && j.`Client_ID` = c.`Client_ID`
   && j.`Service_ID` = s.`Service_ID`
   && jconst.`id` IS NULL

   # Add one AND clause for every service that a client must
   # or must not have use IS NULL if client must not have service
   # or IS NOT NULL if client must have

   && j3.`Job_ID` IS NULL
   && j4.`Job_ID` IS NOT NULL
   && j5.`Job_ID` IS NOT NULL

This query still needs a bit of PHP to generate but it is pretty simple and there are only 2 areas that need to be adjusted on the fly.

I've added a few other parameters since my question to allow more control, but it still revolves around the same idea of using multiple parameters in the ON clause of the LEFT JOIN I am doing.

Thanks again Waygood for your help.

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