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I'm currently working on Zed Shaw's Learn Python the Hard Way.

In exercise 35, one finds a program which includes these lines:

def bear_room():
    print "There is a bear here."
    print "The bear has a bunch of honey."
    print "The fat bear is in front of another door."
    print "How are you going to move the bear?"
    bear_moved = False

    while True:
        next = raw_input("> ")

        if next == "take honey":
            dead("The bear looks at you then slaps your face off.")
        elif next == "taunt bear" and not bear_moved:
            print "The bear has moved from the door. You can go through it now."
            bear_moved = True
        elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:
            dead("The bear gets pissed off and chews your leg off.")
        elif next == "open door" and bear_moved:
            gold_room()
        else:
            print "I got no idea what that means."

All good. But I'd like to give the player an extra chance to survive, and a warning, before losing the game. I came up with this:

def bear_room():
    print "There is a bear here."
    print "There bear has a bunch of honey."
    print "The fat bear is in front of another door."
    print "How are you going to move the bear?"
    bear_moved = False
    bear_moved_again = False

    while True:
        next = raw_input("> ")

        if next == "take honey":
            dead("The bear looks at you then slaps your face off.")
        elif next == "taunt bear" and not bear_moved:
            print "The bear as moved from the door. You can go through it now."
            bear_moved = True
        elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:
            print "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again."
            bear_moved_again = True    
        elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved_again:
            dead("The bear gets pissed off and chews your leg off.")
        elif next == "open door" and bear_moved:
            gold_room()
        else:
            print "I got no idea what that means."

Doesn't work: all i get, if I taunt the bear more than once is the: "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again." string, over and over, whereas, I'd like the player to be able to only taunt the animal twice (first to move it, and getting a warning the second time) before losing. Would you know why?

And another question: if bear_moved is set to False (line 6), and (line 13) says:

elif next == "taunt bear" and not bear_moved:

Wouldn't "and not" set bear_moved to True?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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1  
What exactly doesn't work? –  Lutz Horn May 21 '13 at 10:20
    
Hello Lutz. In my edited version of the program, if I taunt the bear more than once, all I get is the "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again." string, over and over. P.S.: I edited the question, to include this. –  user2331291 May 21 '13 at 10:27
1  
not bear_moved doesn't modify anything -- it's an expression which returns True if bear_moved doesn't evaluate to True, and False otherwise. bear_moved = not bear_moved would have the effect you are imagining, but that is an assignment so it couldn't ever be part of an if condition. –  kampu May 21 '13 at 10:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

change the line

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:

to

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved and not bear_moved_again:

And the line

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved_again:

to

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved and bear_moved_again:

In your original edition, the sentence "elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:" are tested before "elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved_again". If you input "taunt bear" many times, one of "elif next == "taunt bear" and not bear_moved" and "elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved" will ALWAYS be true. The test, "elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved_again", will never be taken.

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The problem is that bear_moved is still true when you've taunted the bear twice, so the line elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved: is fired every time the program tackles the conditional. The line pertaining to bear_moved_again is never reached as it comes after it in the code.

If you change the former branch to the following, the code should work:

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:
    print "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again."
    bear_moved_again = True
    bear_moved = False

Not sure exactly what you mean in the second question, but there is no variable assignment in this line. It's merely checking whether an assertion is the case, not changing anything.

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An effortless way is to swap the the two elif clauses, that is,

change

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:
   print "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again."
   bear_moved_again = True    
elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved_again:
   dead("The bear gets pissed off and chews your leg off.")

to

elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved_again:
   dead("The bear gets pissed off and chews your leg off.")
elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved:
   print "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again."
   bear_moved_again = True    

It might be less readable though.

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You could make bear_moved an int and count the number of times the bear moves

def bear_room():
    print "There is a bear here."
    print "There bear has a bunch of honey."
    print "The fat bear is in front of another door."
    print "How are you going to move the bear?"
    bear_moved = 0

    while True:
        next = raw_input("> ")

        if next == "take honey":
            dead("The bear looks at you then slaps your face off.")
        elif next == "taunt bear" and not bear_moved:
            print "The bear as moved from the door. You can go through it now."
            bear_moved += 1
        elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved == 1:
            print "The bear is getting angry. Don't taunt him again."
            bear_moved += 1   
        elif next == "taunt bear" and bear_moved == 2:
            dead("The bear gets pissed off and chews your leg off.")
        elif next == "open door" and bear_moved:
            gold_room()
        else:
            print "I got no idea what that means."
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you gnibbler, whilst not exactly explaining 'why' it didn't work, you provided an elegant (in my very, very modest opinion) alternative code. Thank you! –  user2331291 May 21 '13 at 10:53

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