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Here is the question as shown below and the answers comes as True.I know there is some promotion which would happen when you compare an signed and unsigned.Can you please tell me how does the signed value gets promoted?

      main()
      {
          signed int a  = -5;
          unsigned int b = 2147483648;

          if(a > b)
             printf("True\n");
         else
          printf("False\n");  

      }

Advanced Thanks Maddy

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marked as duplicate by Daniel Fischer, Pascal Cuoq, Joe, unwind, interjay May 21 '13 at 12:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Conversions from any integer type to an unsigned type are always reductions modulo Utype_MAX + 1, so -5 becomes UINT_MAX - 4 here. Now to look for a dupe. –  Daniel Fischer May 21 '13 at 11:21
1  
int main()... –  user529758 May 21 '13 at 11:21

2 Answers 2

Try printing out the converted value and see what goes on:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
  {
  signed int a  = -5;
  unsigned int ua = a;
  unsigned int b = 2147483648;

  printf("a=%d  ua=%u  b=%u\n", a, ua, b);

  if(a > b)
    printf("True\n");
  else
    printf("False\n");  
  }

prints

a=-5  ua=4294967291  b=2147483648
True

Share and enjoy.

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As you know, the MSB of a signed number is taken as sign bit where in case of an unsigned number, it adds to the value of that number. For a negative number, say -5, the binary value is 11111111111111111111111111111011 where the MSB is the sign bit and rest of the bits give the 2's compliment of 5 (for -5). When this is converted to an unsigned number, all bits are considered to find the value of the number, including the MSB also and so, its value becomes 4294967291.

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