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The following code (a simplified example, I'm actually iterating over a list of objects and trying to trap an exception) performs error handling by going to the next item in the for list. It works, but gives a warning about using the loop control statement within the catch subroutine:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Try::Tiny;
use 5.010;

NUM: for my $num (1 .. 10) { 
  try { 
    if ($num == 7) { 
      die 'ugly number'; 
    } 
  } catch { 
    chomp;
    say qq/got "$_"/; 
    next NUM; 
  }; 
  say qq/number $num/; 
}

Outputs:

number 1
number 2
number 3
number 4
number 5
number 6
got "ugly number at testtry.pl line 9."
Exiting subroutine via next at testtry.pl line 14.
Exiting subroutine via next at testtry.pl line 14.
number 8
number 9
number 10

I can see two ways to work around it -- shut up the warning in the scope of this usage with a scoped no warnings block, or copy the error message off to a temporary variable and check it/next outside of the catch block. The former may have issues I'm overlooking, and the second spreads out the error handling a bit. Which is preferred, or is there another way I'm overlooking?

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Inside the catch block, put a no warnings 'exiting'. This will disable the warning. The strict and warnings pragmas are just there to help you, feel free to disable them lexically when they get in your way.

The perldiag page lists builtin warning and error categories. You can see all messages that will be silenced by disabling this category and decide if it is worth it.

Edit:

You can exploit that a successful try returns undef, but on error you get the value of the catch block. This allows us to do:

NUM: for my $num (1 .. 10) { 
  try {
    die 'ugly number' if $num == 7;
  } catch { 
    chomp;
    say qq/got "$_"/; 
    return 1;       # return some true value
  } and next NUM;   # go to next iteration here, outside the try/catch
  say qq/number $num/; 
}

However, I find the no warnings solution to be more elegant, and far more obvious.

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I was considering this, but I was concerned more that I'd be risking a race condition or somesuch with disabling the exiting earnings. I'll probably end up going this route. –  Oesor May 21 '13 at 14:22
    
Things are looking fine but i did not get the importance of 'and next NUM; ' line. Anyhow iteration is running for defined range so could you please explain this line? –  bimlesh sharma Oct 23 '13 at 16:27
    
@bimleshsharma If we leave out the and next NUM, then number 7 is printed out – which we want to avoid. Therefore, we somehow have to jump to the next loop iteration before say qq/number $num/ is executed. If we do so inside the catch block, we get the warning Exiting subroutine via next which this question is originally about. –  amon Oct 23 '13 at 17:00
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The right solution for this case -- and probably for the more general case you're trying to solve -- is to put stuff that should only happen if there are no errors into the try block rather than relying on explicit loop control. That looks like this:

for my $num (1 .. 10) { 
  try { 
    if ($num == 7) { 
      die 'ugly number'; 
    } 
    say qq/number $num/; 
  } catch { 
    chomp;
    say qq/got "$_"/;
  }; 
}

last is the loop control statement that actually needs a bit of extra care, since it has to do more than simply skip the loop body. But consider

try {
  for my $num (1 .. 10) { 
    try {
      die 'ugly number' if $num == 7;
      die 'early exit' if $num == 9;
      say qq/number $num/; 
    } catch {
      die $_ if /^early exit/;
      chomp;
      say qq/got "$_"/;
    }; 
  }
};
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Another workaround, although perhaps is useful only for this simplified example, and not inside your whole program, is avoid the next instruction putting the code after the die, like:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Try::Tiny;
use 5.010;

for my $num (1 .. 10) { 
  try { 
    if ($num == 7) { 
      die 'ugly number'; 
    }   
    say qq/number $num/; 
  } catch { 
    chomp;
    say qq/got "$_"/; 
    #next NUM; 
  }; 
  #say qq/number $num/; 
}

It yields:

number 1
number 2
number 3
number 4
number 5
number 6
got "ugly number at script.pl line 11."
number 8
number 9
number 10
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1  
There's quite a bit more than a say being done after the error handling, so the first one's a poor option too. If you return in the block (it does that implicitly if you don't have it) it performs the following code, which I don't want. –  Oesor May 21 '13 at 14:01
    
@Oesor: Yes. I realised of it in the second solution and deleted it. –  Birei May 21 '13 at 14:03
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I'm looking for the following flow control, basically. I'm just not a fan of scoping $e up just to make the next NUM error handling.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Try::Tiny;
use 5.010;

NUM: for my $num (1 .. 10) { 
  my $e;
  try { 
    if ($num == 7) { 
      die 'ugly number'; 
    } 
  } catch { 
    chomp;
    say qq/got "$_"/; 
    $e = $_; 
  }; 
  if ($e) {
    next NUM;
  }
  say qq/number $num/; 
}
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