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I got a question. I have a program where I am trying to anchor the beginning of lines with a pipe (|). However, when I execute it, it reduces or deletes lines in my file. As you will see, I am not trying to replace anything, just put | at the beginning of certain lines. Here is the program:

$DESCRIPTION = qr/^[0-9]+\.[0-9]+ +.*? {2,}[0-9]+.*? {2,}[0-9]+.*? {2,}[0-9]+.*? {2,}[0-9]+.*?$/;
$PRICELINE = qr/^[0-9]+.*? {2,}[0-9]+.*?$/;
$PRICELINE2 = qr/^.*? {2,}[0-9]+\.[0-9]+ {2,}[0-9]+\$/;
$CODE = qr/^\w{9}$/;
$date = qr/^AS OF.*?$/;
$accountnumber = qr/^ACCOUNT NUMBER.*?$/;
$name = qr/^CEOTID.*?$/;

while (<>) {
    if (s/($DESCRIPTION)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "1\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($PRICELINE)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "2\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($PRICELINE2)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "3\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($CUSIP)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "4\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($date)/\|$1/g) {print STDOUT "5\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($accountnumber)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "6\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($name)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "7\n"; next LINE;};
    print;  
}
print "\n\ndone"

I have tried to eliminate variables one at a time to see which one is causing the malfunction, but still no luck. I also just used a while statement but it is way slow and still deletes the first line of my file.

Any help would be great, I am honestly pretty new to Perl and not an expert! Thanks everyone, Josh

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You don't need to escape the | character in the replacement part of your s/// operations. An or does not really make sense there, does it? ;-) Also, I strongly suggest you use strict and use warnings for your code. This is probably unrelated, but still helpful in general. –  simbabque May 21 '13 at 14:13
    
Also, please add an example of the data you are reading with this, and tell us how you are calling your program. Looks like you pass the filename as an argument. –  simbabque May 21 '13 at 14:14
1  
When you say "reduces or deletes lines in my file", do you mean that it stops execution with the error Label not found for "next LINE" at ... ? –  TLP May 21 '13 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

EDIT: Note that you have an undeclared variable $CUSIP which you seem to have confused with $CODE. Without strict and warnings turned on, this error will be silent and deadly, but hardly discreet, as it will insert pipe symbols all over your input.

I will take a wild guess and say that it is because you are trying to use a label you have not defined: LINE. This label is used in the following fashion:

LINE: while (<>) {

    ... next LINE;
}

But you can just as easily skip it and just say next, which will refer to the innermost loop. When you do NOT have a label, however, what seems to happen in my tests is simply that it exits the loop with the error

Label not found for "next LINE" at ...

This error is shown even if warnings is off. Which it never should be. The first two lines of any script you write should be:

use strict;
use warnings;

Because it will make your life much easier.

You should also know that you can use lookahead assertions to solve what you are trying to do:

if (s/(?=$DESCRIPTION)/|/i) { ... }

You should be aware that this:

print STDOUT "1\n";

..still prints to the file if you are using inplace edit via the -p and -i switch. If you want some kind of feedback, you can print to STDERR:

print STDERR "1\n";
warn "1\n";          # same thing

Also, you don't have to use the s/// operator at all, you can just check the line, and then use string interpolation to add a pipe symbol:

if (/$DESCRIPTION/) { $_ = "|$_" }

Also, you don't have to use next at all: You can use plain old fashioned logic:

if (/$DESCRIPTION/) { ... }
elsif (/$PRICELINE/) { ... }

So there you have it. And please, start using strict and warnings.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks everyone your tips have been helpful! im going to give these a shot and if I have anymore troubles I will let you know! –  joshE May 21 '13 at 14:35
    
@joshE You are using an undefined variable in the regexes: $CUSIP. If you had been using strict, this would have been prevented. If you had been using warnings, you would have been given a helpful error message. –  TLP May 21 '13 at 14:36
    
the strict warnings opens up a new world for my programming ventures..thanks again to everyone..also @TLP, the interpolation of the variables optimized this this program...and using next instead of next line did the trick...thanks! However the only one problem now, and this happens with some other of my programs..is that just the 1st line of the file gets "deleted." –  joshE May 21 '13 at 17:06
    
@joshE There is nothing in this code that indicates that the first line is skipped. What most likely happens is that your print statement does not get executed because of your next statements. Its hard to say, though, since I cannot see your code, and I suspect that you are using some command line switches as well. –  TLP May 21 '13 at 17:19
LINE: while (<>) {
    if (s/($DESCRIPTION)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "1\n"; next LINE;};
    ...
    print;  
}

When a next LINE statement gets executed, execution goes back to the top of the loop. Your final print statement never gets executed and it seems that some lines are "deleted".

Perl provides the while(EXPR) { BLOCK } continue { BLOCK } syntax so that you can execute some arbitrary code at the end of an iteration. You could put your print statement in the continue block:

LINE: while (<>) {
    if (s/($DESCRIPTION)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "1\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($PRICELINE)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "2\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($PRICELINE2)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "3\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($CUSIP)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "4\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($date)/\|$1/g) {print STDOUT "5\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($accountnumber)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "6\n"; next LINE;};
    if (s/($name)/\|$1/gi) {print STDOUT "7\n"; next LINE;};
} continue {
    print;  
}

Now your print statement always gets executed even if one of the if clauses is executed.

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