Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a protocol like this :

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@protocol StoreDisplayerDelegate <NSObject>

-(void) changeActionForObjectWithId:(NSString *)objectID ;

@end

and i have a callass with conforms to the precedent protocol StoreDisplayerDelegate

@interface ShelfVC : UIViewController :<StoreDisplayerDelegate>
....

@implementation ShelfVC 
...

- (void)viewDidLoad {

   ...
   DownloadManager *manager = [DownloadManager sharedInstance];
   [manager setStoreDisplayerDelegate:self];
   ....
}

#pragma mark StoreDisplayerDelegate methods
-(void) changeActionForObjectWithId:(NSString *)objectID {
   ......
}

@end

And in my code ( in the same class) sometimes i am calling the delegate methods to do something form me, for example :

- (void)anOtherMethod{
   [self changeActionForObjectWithId:nil];
}

My Questions 1. is : When object is a delegate for an other object, is the methods implemented by the delegate called only by the other object ( witch have a reference for it ) ? i mean by this, for example in the code i have shown should the methode changeActionForObjectWithId: just called by the downLoad manager or can i use it in the inernal of my class like this :

  1. is what i am doing cleaning or bad design of using Delegate pattern ?

I hope that it is clear.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In my project I have the same situation for different purpose. In my opinion the delegate method must be called only by the other object, because it is its method.

If you need to do certain action in the delegate method, its better to create another private method to performing the action and call it from the delegate methods.

Some example. Instead of doing this:

- (void)anOtherMethod {
   [self changeActionForObjectWithId:nil];
}

- (void)changeActionForObjectWithId:(NSString *)objectID {
   < some actions >
} 

I do this:

- (void)privateMethod{
   < some actions >
}

- (void)anOtherMethod {
   [self privateMethod];
}

- (void)changeActionForObjectWithId:(NSString *)objectID {
   [self privateMethod];
} 

Why do this? Because you have to think to the delegate methods to an "extension" to your base object: if you delete the "changeActionForObjectWithId" (becuase, for example, you don't need the delegate anymore after a refactoring) the code will continue to work.

share|improve this answer

Your delegate method name sounds like a command.

-(void)changeActionForObjectWithId:(NSString *)objectID;

It sounds like your StoreDisplayer is telling delegate to do something. The fact that you are also tempted to call that method from within the ViewController confirms it.

That is not the delegate pattern. The delegate pattern is for a class to inform a delegate of a change, or to ask the delegate for some information. The delegating class (StoreDisplayer?) shouldn't know about what any particular delegate does, so it shouldn't be able to give it direct specific commands. Only delegate generic behaviour to it.

Delegate method look more like these examples:

-(BOOL)actionShouldChangeForStoreDisplayer:(StoreDisplayer*)storeDisplayer;
-(void)actionWillChangeForStoreDisplayer:(StoreDisplayer*)storeDisplayer objectId:(NSString *)objectId;
-(void)actionDidChangeForStoreDisplayer:(StoreDisplayer*)storeDisplayer objectId:(NSString *)objectId;

I'm not saying those are what you need, but they should give you the idea.

When your delegate methods look like this, clearly you will not be tempted to call them from anything other than the class that's doing the delegation (StoreDisplayer).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. but i have seen in other peopole code that the y call for example the - (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath datasource methods, and i thinks that it is the same with my situation, no ? – samir May 21 '13 at 14:54
    
That comes under the category "to ask the delegate for some information". And you'll note that it passes the UITableView*. You are not passing the StoreDisplayer*. You might think "But I don't need a pointer to the StoreDisplayer". But then you're not following the pattern. And your question was about good design and following the delegate pattern. – Steve Waddicor May 21 '13 at 15:03
    
Thanks for your answer and what are you thinking about @marco's answer ? i am sorry i don't know witch answer is correct and accept it :) – samir May 21 '13 at 15:09
    
They're both correct. I'm dealing with the specifics of the delegate pattern. Marco is giving you a good way to separate the implementation of a protocol from the rest of the functionality of a class. You need both. If you're just wondering which to accept, don't worry about which you think is more correct, just accept the one that helped you most. – Steve Waddicor May 21 '13 at 15:15
    
the two answers helped me :), one for separating my code and the your's for cocoa naming conventions...Thanks – samir May 21 '13 at 15:20

A delegate is a protocol that allows an object to perform certain actions.

In your example:

@interface ShelfVC : UIViewController : <StoreDisplayerDelegate>

This tells the compiler that UIViewController is going to implement some methods in the StoreDisplayerDelegate protocol. How the object that applicable to the StoreDisplayerDelegate behave would depend on the protocol in the delegate methods.

share|improve this answer

You got a little confused with delegates and protocols. a delegate is a design-pattern wich uses a protocol. a protocol only defines methods and properties expected to be implemented by another (unspecific) class. from where this methods/properties get accessed doesn't matter.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.