Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Java EE has ServletRequest.getParameterValues().

On non-EE platforms, URL.getQuery() simply returns a string.

What's the normal way to properly parse the query string in a URL when not on Java EE?


<rant>

It is popular in the answers to try and make your own parser. This is very interesting and exciting micro-coding project, but I cannot say that it is a good idea :(

The code snippets below are generally flawed or broken, btw. Breaking them is an interesting exercise for the reader. And to the hackers attacking the websites that use them.

Parsing query strings is a well defined problem but reading the spec and understanding the nuances is non-trivial. It is far better to let some platform library coder do the hard work, and do the fixing, for you!

</rant>

share|improve this question
1  
Are you wanting to do this from a servlet or a JSP page? I need some clarification before I answer. –  ChadNC Nov 3 '09 at 13:35
1  
Do you also need to parse POST parameters? –  Thilo Nov 3 '09 at 13:54
2  
Even if you are on J2EE (or on SE with selected EE packages added via OSGi, like me), this question could make sense. In my case, the query strings / url-encoded POST bodies are processed by a part of the system that's intentionally agnostic to stuff like ServletRequest. –  Hanno Fietz May 19 '11 at 10:22
36  
Upvoted for <rant />! –  Damian Nowak Jul 28 '11 at 13:44
6  
+1 for <rant/>. –  David Moles May 24 '12 at 19:00
show 4 more comments

19 Answers

up vote 81 down vote accepted

On Android:

Uri uri=Uri.parse(url_string);
uri.getQueryParameter("para1");
share|improve this answer
10  
note that this uses the Uri class and not the URI class (Uri is part of android.net, while URI is part of java.net) –  Marius Jan 5 '12 at 9:38
2  
Also note that prior to Ice Cream Sandwich, this fails to parse + characters in values to a space character. –  rpetrich Nov 7 '12 at 20:51
add comment

On Android, the Apache libraries provide a Query parser:

http://developer.android.com/reference/org/apache/http/client/utils/URLEncodedUtils.html and http://hc.apache.org/httpcomponents-client-ga/httpclient/apidocs/org/apache/http/client/utils/URLEncodedUtils.html

share|improve this answer
8  
This is available in the apache http client library, not only on Android. Btw, the link to apache was changed. Latest is: hc.apache.org/httpcomponents-client-ga/httpclient/apidocs/org/… –  Cristian Vrabie Dec 16 '10 at 13:14
8  
Annoyingly URLEncodedUtils.parse() returns a List that you would then have to loop through to find the value for a specific key. It would be much nicer if it returned a Map like in BalusC's answer. –  Asaph Apr 27 '11 at 22:15
1  
@Hanno Fietz you mean you trust these alternatives? I know they are buggy. I know pointing out the bugs I see will only encourage people to adopt 'fixed' versions, rather than themselves look for the bugs I've overlooked. –  Will May 19 '11 at 10:57
1  
@Will - well, I would never just trust copy-and-paste snippets I got from any website, and no one should. But here, these snippets are rather well reviewed and commented on and thus are really helpful, actually. Simply seeing some suggestions on what might be wrong with the code is already a great help in thinking for myself. And mind you, I didn't mean to say "roll your own is better", but rather that it's great to have good material for an informed decision in my own code. –  Hanno Fietz May 23 '11 at 10:55
7  
I imagine parse returns a list so that it maintain positional ordering and more easily allows duplicate entries. –  dhaag23 Oct 27 '11 at 18:41
show 5 more comments

Here is BalusC's answer, but it compiles and returns results:

public static Map<String, List<String>> getUrlParameters(String url)
        throws UnsupportedEncodingException {
    Map<String, List<String>> params = new HashMap<String, List<String>>();
    String[] urlParts = url.split("\\?");
    if (urlParts.length > 1) {
        String query = urlParts[1];
        for (String param : query.split("&")) {
            String pair[] = param.split("=");
            String key = URLDecoder.decode(pair[0], "UTF-8");
            String value = "";
            if (pair.length > 1) {
                value = URLDecoder.decode(pair[1], "UTF-8");
            }
            List<String> values = params.get(key);
            if (values == null) {
                values = new ArrayList<String>();
                params.put(key, values);
            }
            values.add(value);
        }
    }
    return params;
}
share|improve this answer
    
JVM Note: I have implemented an equivalent form of this in Scala using Java Collections; here is the github gist: gist.github.com/3504765 –  Jay Taylor Aug 28 '12 at 22:10
1  
I suggest changing String pair[] = param.split("="); into String pair[] = param.split("=", 2); to split the key=value pair only on the first occurrence. I believe it is allowed to have unencoded equals signs in the value. –  user665780 Jul 25 '13 at 7:57
add comment

If you have jetty (server or client) libs on your classpath you can use the jetty util classes (see javadoc), e.g.:

import org.eclipse.jetty.util.*;
URL url = new URL("www.example.com/index.php?foo=bar&bla=blub");
MultiMap<String> params = new MultiMap<String>();
UrlEncoded.decodeTo(url.getQuery(), params, "UTF-8");

assert params.getString("foo").equals("bar");
assert params.getString("bla").equals("blub");
share|improve this answer
add comment

For a servlet or a JSP page you can get querystring key/value pairs by using request.getParameter("paramname")

String name = request.getParameter("name");

There are other ways of doing it but that's the way I do it in all the servlets and jsp pages that I create.

share|improve this answer
3  
HttpServletRequest is part of J2EE which he doesn't have. Also using getParamter() is not really parsing. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Nov 3 '09 at 14:48
3  
Please take the time to read the comment in which I asked for clarification of his question. This answer is in response to his answer to that comment in which he stated, "I'm trying to do this on Android, but all answers on all platforms would be useful answers that might give pointers (also to others who might come across this question) so don't hold back!" I answered his question based off of that comment. If you don't have anything useful to add, don't add anything –  ChadNC Nov 3 '09 at 14:55
1  
Don't be too upset. "This doesn't answer the question" is useful to add, IMO. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Nov 3 '09 at 15:08
1  
It doesn't matter Android or not, the question is how to parse String containing URL and get URL parameters out of it. What you're porting here is part of Servlet API, where Servlet container parses incoming parameters from HTTP request for you. It's irrelevant, because question is about parsing String that contains URL, not HTTP request, and not inside Servlet container. –  mvmn Feb 6 '12 at 12:42
add comment

If you're using Spring 3.1 or greater (yikes, was hoping that support went back further), you can use the UriComponents and UriComponentsBuilder:

UriComponents components = UriComponentsBuilder.fromUri(uri).build();
List<String> myParam = components.getQueryParams().get("myParam");

components.getQueryParams() returns a MultiValueMap<String, String>

Here's some more documentation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Parsing the query string is a bit more complicated than it seems, depending on how forgiving you want to be.

First, the query string is ascii bytes. You read in these bytes one at a time and convert them to characters. If the character is ? or & then it signals the start of a parameter name. If the character is = then it signals the start of a paramter value. If the character is % then it signals the start of an encoded byte. Here is where it gets tricky.

When you read in a % char you have to read the next two bytes and interpret them as hex digits. That means the next two bytes will be 0-9, a-f or A-F. Glue these two hex digits together to get your byte value. But remember, bytes are not characters. You have to know what encoding was used to encode the characters. The character é does not encode the same in UTF-8 as it does in ISO-8859-1. In general it's impossible to know what encoding was used for a given character set. I always use UTF-8 because my web site is configured to always serve everything using UTF-8 but in practice you can't be certain. Some user-agents will tell you the character encoding in the request; you can try to read that if you have a full HTTP request. If you just have a url in isolation, good luck.

Anyway, assuming you are using UTF-8 or some other multi-byte character encoding, now that you've decoded one encoded byte you have to set it aside until you capture the next byte. You need all the encoded bytes that are together because you can't url-decode properly one byte at a time. Set aside all the bytes that are together then decode them all at once to reconstruct your character.

Plus it gets more fun if you want to be lenient and account for user-agents that mangle urls. For example, some webmail clients double-encode things. Or double up the ?&= chars (for example: http://yoursite.com/blah??p1==v1&&p2==v2). If you want to try to gracefully deal with this, you will need to add more logic to your parser.

share|improve this answer
    
That does not explain how to parse or retrieve querystring parameter values –  ChadNC Nov 3 '09 at 14:58
    
Right, but a bit cumbersome. For that we already have URLDecoder. –  BalusC Nov 3 '09 at 15:18
2  
@ChadNC: the third sentence tells you how to parse: read in one byte at a time and convert to chars. The fourth sentence warns you of special chars. Etc. Maybe you didn't read the answer? –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Nov 3 '09 at 15:18
    
@BalusC: URLDecoder works but it has some failure modes if you are trying to be more lenient in what kind of URL you accept. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Nov 3 '09 at 15:19
1  
Agree with @Mr.ShinyAndNew parse query param is not easy. I'm supporting FIQL and this become a REAL pain in the ass. E.g: yoursite.com/blah??p1==v1&&p2==v2,p2==v3;p2==v4 –  rafa.ferreira Jun 20 '11 at 22:01
add comment

Just for reference, this is what I've ended up with (based on URLEncodedUtils, and returning a Map).

Features:

  • it accepts the query string part of the url (you can use request.getQueryString())
  • an empty query string will produce an empty Map
  • a parameter without a value (?test) will be mapped to an empty List<String>

Code:

public static Map<String, List<String>> getParameterMapOfLists(String queryString) {
    Map<String, List<String>> mapOfLists = new HashMap<String, List<String>>();
    if (queryString == null || queryString.length() == 0) {
        return mapOfLists;
    }
    List<NameValuePair> list = URLEncodedUtils.parse(URI.create("http://localhost/?" + queryString), "UTF-8");
    for (NameValuePair pair : list) {
        List<String> values = mapOfLists.get(pair.getName());
        if (values == null) {
            values = new ArrayList<String>();
            mapOfLists.put(pair.getName(), values);
        }
        if (pair.getValue() != null) {
            values.add(pair.getValue());
        }
    }

    return mapOfLists;
}

A compatibility helper (values are stored in a String array just as in ServletRequest.getParameterMap()):

public static Map<String, String[]> getParameterMap(String queryString) {
    Map<String, List<String>> mapOfLists = getParameterMapOfLists(queryString);

    Map<String, String[]> mapOfArrays = new HashMap<String, String[]>();
    for (String key : mapOfLists.keySet()) {
        mapOfArrays.put(key, mapOfLists.get(key).toArray(new String[] {}));
    }

    return mapOfArrays;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

On Android, I tried using @diyism answer but I encountered the space character issue raised by @rpetrich, for example: I fill out a form where username = "us+us" and password = "pw pw" causing a URL string to look like:

http://somewhere?username=us%2Bus&password=pw+pw

However, @diyism code returns "us+us" and "pw+pw", i.e. it doesn't detect the space character. If the URL was rewritten with %20 the space character gets identified:

http://somewhere?username=us%2Bus&password=pw%20pw

This leads to the following fix:

Uri uri = Uri.parse(url_string.replace("+", "%20"));
uri.getQueryParameter("para1");
share|improve this answer
    
replace(" ", "%20") this feels wrong. But did the trick for me :D –  Mārtiņš Briedis Mar 10 '13 at 22:16
    
Correct syntax should be "some string".replaceAll("[+]", "%20"); –  RRTW Mar 12 '13 at 7:35
add comment

On Android, you can use the Uri.parse static method of the android.net.Uri class to do the heavy lifting. If you're doing anything with URIs and Intents you'll want to use it anyways.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This works for me.. I'm not sure why every one was after a Map, List> All I needed was a simple name value Map.

To keep things simple I used the build in URI.getQuery();

public static Map<String, String> getUrlParameters(URI uri)
    throws UnsupportedEncodingException {
    Map<String, String> params = new HashMap<String, String>();
    for (String param : uri.getQuery().split("&")) {
        String pair[] = param.split("=");
        String key = URLDecoder.decode(pair[0], "UTF-8");
        String value = "";
        if (pair.length > 1) {
            value = URLDecoder.decode(pair[1], "UTF-8");
        }
        params.put(new String(key), new String(value));
    }
    return params;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
how about forms with multiple selection? Its perfectly normal to have keys repeated in legitimate query strings (and POST form bodies). There are other defects and corner-cases not covered; many of them have been mentioned in commentary on other approaches. I'll refrain form pointing them out in fear that you fix it instead of using a quality library, as per my rant in the question ;) –  Will Feb 12 '12 at 15:16
add comment

Guava's Multimap is better suited for this. Here is a short clean version:

Multimap<String, String> getUrlParameters(String url) {
        try {
            Multimap<String, String> ret = ArrayListMultimap.create();
            for (NameValuePair param : URLEncodedUtils.parse(new URI(url), "UTF-8")) {
                ret.put(param.getName(), param.getValue());
            }
            return ret;
        } catch (URISyntaxException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

I don't think there is one in JRE. You can find similar functions in other packages like Apache HttpClient. If you don't use any other packages, you just have to write your own. It's not that hard. Here is what I use,

public class QueryString {

 private Map<String, List<String>> parameters;

 public QueryString(String qs) {
  parameters = new TreeMap<String, List<String>>();

  // Parse query string
     String pairs[] = qs.split("&");
     for (String pair : pairs) {
            String name;
            String value;
            int pos = pair.indexOf('=');
            // for "n=", the value is "", for "n", the value is null
         if (pos == -1) {
          name = pair;
          value = null;
         } else {
       try {
        name = URLDecoder.decode(pair.substring(0, pos), "UTF-8");
              value = URLDecoder.decode(pair.substring(pos+1, pair.length()), "UTF-8");            
       } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
        // Not really possible, throw unchecked
           throw new IllegalStateException("No UTF-8");
       }
         }
         List<String> list = parameters.get(name);
         if (list == null) {
          list = new ArrayList<String>();
          parameters.put(name, list);
         }
         list.add(value);
     }
 }

 public String getParameter(String name) {        
  List<String> values = parameters.get(name);
  if (values == null)
   return null;

  if (values.size() == 0)
   return "";

  return values.get(0);
 }

 public String[] getParameterValues(String name) {        
  List<String> values = parameters.get(name);
  if (values == null)
   return null;

  return (String[])values.toArray(new String[values.size()]);
 }

 public Enumeration<String> getParameterNames() {  
  return Collections.enumeration(parameters.keySet()); 
 }

 public Map<String, String[]> getParameterMap() {
  Map<String, String[]> map = new TreeMap<String, String[]>();
  for (Map.Entry<String, List<String>> entry : parameters.entrySet()) {
   List<String> list = entry.getValue();
   String[] values;
   if (list == null)
    values = null;
   else
    values = (String[]) list.toArray(new String[list.size()]);
   map.put(entry.getKey(), values);
  }
  return map;
 } 
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the way with the apache classes? –  Will Nov 3 '09 at 18:18
1  
You can use parse() method: hc.apache.org/httpcomponents-client/httpclient/apidocs/org/… –  ZZ Coder Nov 3 '09 at 22:01
3  
Please put the apache commons link in its own answer so I can vote it up. –  itsadok Nov 5 '09 at 7:24
add comment

Based on the answer from BalusC, i wrote some example-Java-Code:

    if (queryString != null)
    {
        final String[] arrParameters = queryString.split("&");
        for (final String tempParameterString : arrParameters)
        {
            final String[] arrTempParameter = tempParameterString.split("=");
            if (arrTempParameter.length >= 2)
            {
                final String parameterKey = arrTempParameter[0];
                final String parameterValue = arrTempParameter[1];
                //do something with the parameters
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment
public static Map <String, String> parseQueryString (final URL url)
        throws UnsupportedEncodingException
{
    final Map <String, String> qps = new TreeMap <String, String> ();
    final StringTokenizer pairs = new StringTokenizer (url.getQuery (), "&");
    while (pairs.hasMoreTokens ())
    {
        final String pair = pairs.nextToken ();
        final StringTokenizer parts = new StringTokenizer (pair, "=");
        final String name = URLDecoder.decode (parts.nextToken (), "ISO-8859-1");
        final String value = URLDecoder.decode (parts.nextToken (), "ISO-8859-1");
        qps.put (name, value);
    }
    return qps;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Use Apache HttpComponents and wire it up with some collection code to access params by value: http://www.joelgerard.com/2012/09/14/parsing-query-strings-in-java-and-accessing-values-by-key/

share|improve this answer
add comment

using Guava:

Multimap<String,String> parseQueryString(String queryString, String encoding) {
    LinkedListMultimap<String, String> result = LinkedListMultimap.create();

    for(String entry : Splitter.on("&").omitEmptyStrings().split(queryString)) {
        String pair [] = entry.split("=", 2);
        try {
            result.put(URLDecoder.decode(pair[0], encoding), pair.length == 2 ? URLDecoder.decode(pair[1], encoding) : null);
        } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You say "Java" but "not Java EE". Do you mean you are using JSP and/or servlets but not a full Java EE stack? If that's the case, then you should still have request.getParameter() available to you.

If you mean you are writing Java but you are not writing JSPs nor servlets, or that you're just using Java as your reference point but you're on some other platform that doesn't have built-in parameter parsing ... Wow, that just sounds like an unlikely question, but if so, the principle would be:

xparm=0
word=""
loop
  get next char
  if no char
    exit loop
  if char=='='
    param_name[xparm]=word
    word=""
  else if char=='&'
    param_value[xparm]=word
    word=""
    xparm=xparm+1
  else if char=='%'
    read next two chars
    word=word+interpret the chars as hex digits to make a byte
  else
    word=word+char

(I could write Java code but that would be pointless, because if you have Java available, you can just use request.getParameters.)

share|improve this answer
    
watch out for the character encoding when url-decoding the hex digits. –  Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Nov 3 '09 at 15:17
    
It's Android, hence Java but not J2EE. –  Andrzej Doyle Nov 3 '09 at 15:19
    
I forgot to mention: You also need to check for "+", which should be translated to a space. Embedded spaces are illegal in a query string. –  Jay Nov 3 '09 at 17:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.