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I'm trying to learn OOP in javascript.

I made the following code that is supposed to return the time spent in a certain mailthread:

function mailThread(url) {
    this.timerIsOn = true;
    this.c = 0;
    this.url = url;
    this.timerCounter = function () {
        if(this.timerIsOn) { //doesnt get called??
            console.log('timerison');
            this.c = this.c + 1;
            console.log(this.c);
        } else {
            this.windowTimeOpen = this.c
        }
    }
    this.timerInterval = setInterval(this.timerCounter, 1000);
}

mailThread1 = new mailThread('test');

However this.timerIsOn seems to return undefined thus preventing the timer from running. What am I doing wrong here?

Also I tested this in the following Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/B5vt5/

share|improve this question
1  
In your fiddle, why do you have alersdsdt (this.timerIsOn);? –  Ian May 21 '13 at 14:52
    
sorry didn't save yet :S should be gone now –  Bunker May 21 '13 at 14:53
1  
The problem is that the value of this changes when you pass the function reference to setInterval. If you declare var self = this; at the top of your function and continually use self instead of this, it should work: jsfiddle.net/B5vt5/2 –  Ian May 21 '13 at 14:55
    
When your object ist supposed to be new'ed, then you should name it as an object with an uppercase letter by convention. It should be MailThread instead of mailThread to show that it must be new'ed instead of being a normal function you just call. –  Sebastian P.R. Gingter May 21 '13 at 14:55
    
@Bunker I would also be careful using setInterval() as this is not accurate. it would be better to get the current epoch time when you set it up and count the time elapsed from that. it will always be accurate. More information here: epochconverter.com –  David Ziemann May 21 '13 at 14:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that within the scope of the function called timerCounter, "this" refers to the function itself. Do this:

function mailThread(url) {
    var self = this;
    self.timerIsOn = true;
    self.c = 0;
    self.url = url;
    self.timerCounter = function () {
    if (self.timerIsOn) { //Using self instead of this
        console.log('timerison');
        self.c=this.c+1;
        console.log(self.c);
    } else {
    self.windowTimeOpen = self.c
    }
    }
    self.timerInterval = setInterval(self.timerCounter,1000);
}

mailThread1 = new mailThread('test');

I recommend you look at MDN introduction to OOP

share|improve this answer

this isn't your object in the callback you give to setTimeout, but the global object (window). A solution is to save it in a variable :

var _this = this;
this.timerCounter = function () {
    if (_this.timerIsOn) { 
        console.log('timerison');
        _this.c++;
        console.log(_this.c);
    } else {
         _this.windowTimeOpen = _this.c
    }
}
share|improve this answer

this.timerCounter is a function. When its called from setTimeout it's given the window context, so this is not what you think it is.

You either need to use .bind to set this to what you want.

this.timerInterval = setInterval(this.timerCounter.bind(this),1000);

Or, save this into a variable:

var that = this;
this.timerCounter = function () {
    if (that.timerIsOn) {
        // use that instead of this
    }
}

this.timerInterval = setInterval(this.timerCounter,1000);
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