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I am trying to find how DST works,for that I have written sample of code which talks about DST,I wonder why TimeZone changes at 1:00AM as per my understanding DST end 03 November 2013 at 2:00AM so at 2:00AM it should give 1:00AM then TimeZone should be chnaged, but its not like that. Can anyone help me out of this...

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException 
{
    TimeZone.setDefault(TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/Los_Angeles"));
    DateFormat fmt = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yy HH:mm:ss zz");

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.set(2013, 10, 03, 0, 59, 59);
    System.out.println(fmt.format(cal.getTime()));

    cal.set(2013, 10, 03, 1, 0, 0);
    System.out.println(fmt.format(cal.getTime()));
}

Output:

03-11-13 00:59:59 PDT
03-11-13 01:00:00 PST
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The output looks sane to me - what were you expecting, and why? –  Andrzej Doyle May 21 '13 at 15:35
    
1:30am would be PST because that's what timezone is in effect in Los Angeles at 1:30 on that date. Perhaps the confusion is over that "lost hour" from 1:00 PDT to 1:59 PDT. There is no way to refer to it with the given time zone, you'd have to use PDT explicitly. –  Andrzej Doyle May 21 '13 at 15:43
    
@AndrzejDoyle : Thanks for your response I am expecting TimeZone should be changed at 1:59:30AM because DST ens at 2:00AM so we have to move back the clock by 1 hour as per my understanding. For start of DST it is giving 3:00 AM at 1:59:60AM as it forward the clock by 1 hour...may be I am not clear at that point... I need some clarification here only. –  JackNeil May 21 '13 at 15:43
2  
yes, the timezone changes at 01:59:59 PDT. At which point it becomes 02:00:00 PDT, which is 01:00:00 PST. So when you set the Calendar to 1am in the America/Los Angeles timezone, there are two completely different times that this refers to (1am PDT and 2am PDT). Convention is that this means "1am the second time round", i.e. 1am PST/2am PDT. –  Andrzej Doyle May 21 '13 at 16:30
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

01:00 happens twice, once in PDT and once (an hour later) in PST.

If you tell the Calendar that it is 01:00 on a date of time change, then the class identifies that your input corresponds to 2 distinct possible times, and arbitrarily uses one of them.

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Can you please explain your answer little bit more if you don't mind –  JackNeil May 21 '13 at 15:55
1  
As I understand it, when 02:00 PDT comes round, you take the hour hand of your clock and push it back to 01:00, right? So you have had 01:00 PDT then an hour later 01:00 PST. Unless I'm mistaking the direction of the clock change... which is about 50% likely... –  Andrew Spencer May 21 '13 at 16:01
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@Andrew Spencer is right, 1:00 a.m. has two possibilities, and Calendar picked one of them, just not the one you were expecting. If you want to see 1:00 AM PDT, then just add a minute to 12:59 AM:

  public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    TimeZone.setDefault(TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/Los_Angeles"));
    DateFormat fmt = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yy HH:mm:ss zz");

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.set(2013, 10, 03, 0, 59, 59);
    System.out.println(fmt.format(cal.getTime()));

    cal.add(Calendar.MINUTE, 1);  // this will still be in PDT
    System.out.println(fmt.format(cal.getTime()));
  }
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If I understand you correctly you wonder why 03-11-13 01:00:00 is PST? I think you explained this yourself. If 2:00 actually has to be moved to 1:00, so 1:00 is already daylight saving time, i.e. PST.

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Thanks for Your response..Can you please explain your answer little bit more –  JackNeil May 21 '13 at 15:56
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