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I had an exam, and I've been struggling ever since. You have an array of integers(ex. 13, 6, 21, 4), and I need to make an output that looks like:

13 = 2^3 + 2^2 + 2^0
6 = 2^2 + 2^1
21 = 2^4 + 2^2 + 2^0
4 = 2^2

here's what i've got so far.

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAX 100

int main() {
    int niz[MAX], nizb, n, i, ones, k;

    while(1) {
        printf("Array length: ");
        scanf("%d", &n);

        if (n<=0 || n>MAX) break;

        printf("Array elements: ");
        for(i=0;i<n;i++){
            scanf("%d", &niz[i]);
            if (niz[i] <=0) {
                printf("Error! Wrong value. Enter new one: ");
                scanf("%d", &niz[i]);
            }
        }

        for(i=0;i<n;i++) {
            nizb = niz[i];
            ones = 0;

            for(k=0; k < 16; k++) {
                //What should i do here?
            }

        }

    }
}

I'm stuck here. I dont know how many bits should i use, and how does C sees those bits of integer. I'm using var 'k' to add to a string that is in format '2^3 + 2^2 ...', where k is the value of 'for' iteration. I have made an assumption that length of the integer is 16, but im really not sure since we do this on a sheet of paper.

I want to say BIG THANKS TO EVERYONE!!!

share|improve this question
    
This is more of a mathematical question, but how would you determine the 2-complements on paper (without the help of a computer)? As soon as you know that, you can begin translating it for the computer. –  Refugnic Eternium May 21 '13 at 16:58
    
Why are you talking about two's complement if you don't allow or use negative numbers? –  cHao May 21 '13 at 17:13
    
ask my professors :( –  Cola GGS May 21 '13 at 17:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure what this has to do with twos-complement (which is a particular way of representing negative numbers). What you are trying to do is express an integer as a sum of powers of 2, apparently. Here's the way I'd do it, which isn't necessarily better or worse than the other answers...

void powersum(int n)
{ int powers[sizeof(int) << 3];
  int i;
  char *sep = "";

  printf("%d = ", n);

  powers[0] = 0;

  for (i = 0; n; n >>= 1, ++i)
    powers[i] = n & 1;

  while (--i >= 0)
  { if (powers[i])
    { printf("%s2^%d", sep, i);
      sep = " + ";
    }
  }

  printf("\n");
}

EDIT: Here's another version that doesn't use the stack-allocated array, but as a tradeoff has to go around the loop more (once for each bit, as opposed to only looping until the highest 1-bit is found):

void powersum2(int n)
{ int i = (sizeof(int) << 3) - 2;
  int m = 1 << i;
  char *sep = "";

  printf("%d = ", n);

  while (m)
  { if (n & m)
    { printf("%s2^%d", sep, i);
      sep = " + ";
    }
    m >>= 1;
    --i;
  }

  printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
yea this seems to do the work, but only if the array goes in order from lower to higher number, but i can deal with it. this helps me a lot. and i have realized that i need to deal with shifting much more. Thank you. –  Cola GGS May 21 '13 at 17:33
    
I think this one misbehaves for 0, no? –  kusma May 21 '13 at 17:34
    
@kusma depends on what you mean by "misbehaves". It prints "0 =", which might not be exactly what is wanted, but extending it to deal with 0 as a special case at the beginning should be simple enough. It most likely does misbehave for negative numbers, though, since the first loop will never terminate - making it take unsigned int as a parameter would fix that, at the expense of semantics... –  twalberg May 21 '13 at 17:37
    
It always enters the do loop, and since the "powers"-array is static, it might print something bogus if powers[0] was written a non-zero value the last time it was invoked. –  kusma May 21 '13 at 17:39
    
@kusma Ah... nice catch. Added an explicit initialization of the first element to fix that case. –  twalberg May 21 '13 at 17:41

You can calculate how many bits to use by using the sizeof operator and CHAR_BIT:

int bitsPerInt = sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT;

CHAR_BIT is definied in limits.h.

After you have that limit, you can use the bitwise & operator to extract each bit:

for (k = bitsPerInt - 1; k >= 0; k--)
{
    if (nizb & (1U << k))
        // output
    else
        // don't
}

I'll leave the details up to you.

Aside: It looks like you're trying to use niz as an array, but you haven't declared it as one. Does this code even compile? Also, the return value of main should be int.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah yea, i edited it, forgot to add that to declaration. haven't seen that. So i tried to make a comparison of bits and then to add it to sum as 2^k per iteration. but it didnt work out. –  Cola GGS May 21 '13 at 17:06
    
Why do you need to keep any sum? –  Carl Norum May 21 '13 at 17:14
    
i dont. i made some minor mistakes while thinking of how to make this last part work as it is intended. Does C make a conversion of integer to binary when u use bit operators? Sorry im so new to C. –  Cola GGS May 21 '13 at 17:22
    
What does "conversion of integer to binary" mean? The integer is already in binary, presumably. –  Carl Norum May 21 '13 at 17:30
    
let me try explain. Can i use bit operators just like if i would convert integer from decimal to binary and use it to see in which places are ones, and then use those places to make a sum of powers of 2. –  Cola GGS May 21 '13 at 17:36

This is complete conjecture, since I'm not really good with math, but I think I'd go about it like this:

 int potency = 0, base = 1;
 while(base < NumberInQuestion) {
     base *= 2;
     ++potency;
 }

After the loop finishes, you'll know the highest potency which still fits into 'Number'.

 Number -= base/2; //Removes the base you just calculated from the number.
 printf("2^%d", potency);

Rinse and repeat, until Number falls to 0, which should be at 2^0 at latest.

For your use-case, the code may look somewhat like this:

for(i=0; i < n; ++i) {
    int Number = niz[i];
    while(Number > 0) {
        int potency = 0, base = 1;
        do {               //Executes at least once, making a number of '1' possible.
            base *= 2;
            ++potency;
        } while(base < Number);
        Number -= base/2; //Reverts the last step you made, making the 'base' smaller than 'Number'.
        printf("2^%d", potency);
    }
}

There's a possible alternative, which can give you a more complete picture of things and will save you iterations. For this we use a two-step process.

for(i=0; i < n; ++i) {
    int Number = niz[i];
    int potency = 0, base = 1;
    do {               //Executes at least once, making a number of '1' possible.
        base *= 2;
        ++potency;
    } while(base < Number);

    base /= 2;                      //Reverses the last iteration.

    //At this point, we know the maximum potency, which still fits into the number.
    //In regards of base 2, we know the Most Significant Bit.
    while(base > 0) {
        Number -= base;             //Removes the MSD (Most significant digit)
        printf("2^%d", potency);    //Prints your '1'.
        while(base > Number) {      //Executes at least once.
            base /= 2;              //Goes back one potency. (Ends at '0' latest.)
            --potency;              //For each potency (except for first), it's a '0'.
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh ya, u gave me idea actually that i dont need to use variable sum. But how do I compare where is 1 and where is 0? I know that i will use for example > exp = ((nizb & 1)==0)?'0':'1' sec ill give it a try.. what about shifting? –  Cola GGS May 21 '13 at 17:10
    
@user2406286 There already is an answer, which explains the use of 'shifting' pretty well. My answer is for a more broad range of bases (if it doesn't have to be '2' of all things). Where there's one and where there's Zero is pretty self explanatory actually. It always looks for the 'highest multiple of base'...all those are '1'. All those who get skipped in the process are '0'. You can go reverse too. After determining the maximum multiple which fits into the original number, you decrease the base by itself and look if it's still bigger. –  Refugnic Eternium May 21 '13 at 17:51
quotient = niz[i];
 int k=0,c[MAX];

while(quotient!=0){

     binaryNumber[i++]= quotient % 2;  //this will convert your numbers to binary form 

     quotient = quotient / 2;          //and store in reverse in array

}
for(j = 0 ;j<i;j++)                 
 {                            
     if(binaryNumber[j]==1)  */e.g binary of 4 is stored in array as 001 ie 1 atpos2*/
  {  c[k]=j;
    k++;}
 }
  while(k--)
   printf("2^%d +",c[k]);  
share|improve this answer

If you can tolerate a GCC-dependency, a hack on @twalberg's solution get's really nice and small ;)

void powersum(int n)
{
    char *sep = "";
    printf("%d = ", n);

    while (n) {
        int pos = 31 - __builtin_clz(n);
        printf("%s2^%d", sep, pos);
        sep = " + ";
        n ^= 1 << pos;
    }

    printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer

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