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Whats the best way to shuffle a certain percentage of elements in a vector.

Say I want 10% or 90% of the vector shuffled. Not necessarily the first 10% but just 10% across the board.

TIA

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do you need precise probabilistic properties or not ? the answer depends on it. –  fa. Nov 3 '09 at 15:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Modify a Fisher-Yates shuffle to do nothing on 10% of the indices in the array.

This is java code that I'm posting (from Wikipedia) and modifying, but I think you can make the translation to C++, because this is more of an algorithms problem than a language problem.

public static void shuffleNinetyPercent(int[] array) 
{
    Random rng = new Random();       // java.util.Random.
    int n = array.length;            // The number of items left to shuffle (loop invariant).
    while (n > 1) 
    {
        n--;                         // n is now the last pertinent index
        if (rng.nextDouble() < 0.1) continue; //<-- ADD THIS LINE
        int k = rng.nextInt(n + 1);  // 0 <= k <= n.
        // Simple swap of variables
        int tmp = array[k];
        array[k] = array[n];
        array[n] = tmp;
    }
}
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1  
That does not guarantee that 10% of array will be shuffled, because of randomness in if (rng.nextDouble() < 0.1) continue –  Aleksei Potov Nov 3 '09 at 14:42
1  
Right. That gets you approximately 90% of the array shuffled. Maybe then it's better to shuffle a list of all array indices, then call continue if the current index is in the first 10% of that shuffled array of indices. –  Ken Bloom Nov 3 '09 at 14:48
    
I agree it would be better –  fa. Nov 3 '09 at 14:54

one way may using , std::random_shuffle() , control % by controlling input range ....

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Why not perform N swaps of randomly selected positions, where N is determined by the percentage?

So if I have 100 elements, a 10% shuffle will perform 10 swaps. Each swap randomly picks two elements in the array and switches them.

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This probably won't give uniform probability to all of the various kinds of shuffles that you want. –  Ken Bloom Nov 3 '09 at 14:40
1  
@kbloom: What do you mean by "all the various kinds of shuffles that you want"? We all know what a shuffle is. What is a 10% shuffle? A shuffle where 10% of the elements have potentially changed position? A shuffle where exactly 10% of the elements have changed position? A full shuffle over some 10% of the array, either predefined or randomly picked? There's lots of things like this: given a random chord in a circle, what's the probability it's longer than a leg of an inscribed equilateral triangle? It's one half, or one third, or one fourth. –  David Thornley Nov 3 '09 at 15:07

you can use the shuffle bag algorithm to select 10% of your array. Then use the normal shuffle on that selection.

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How about writing your own random iterator and using random_shuffle, something like this: (Completely untested, just to get an idea)

template<class T>
class myRandomIterator : public std::iterator<std::random_access_iterator_tag, T>
{
public:
    myRandomIterator(std::vector<T>& vec, size_t pos = 0): myVec(vec), myIndex(0), myPos(pos)
    {
    	srand(time(NULL));
    }

    bool operator==(const myRandomIterator& rhs) const
    {
    	return myPos == rhs.myPos;
    }

    bool operator!=(const myRandomIterator& rhs) const
    {
    	return ! (myPos == rhs.myPos);
    }

    bool operator<(const myRandomIterator& rhs) const
    {
    	return myPos < rhs.myPos;
    }

    myRandomIterator& operator++() 
    {
    	++myPos;
    	return fill();
    }

    myRandomIterator& operator++(int) 
    {
    	++myPos;
    	return fill();
    }

    myRandomIterator& operator--() 
    {
    	--myPos;
    	return fill();
    }

    myRandomIterator& operator--(int)
    {
    	--myPos;
    	return fill();
    }



    myRandomIterator& operator+(size_t n) 
    {
    	++myPos;
    	return fill();
    }

    myRandomIterator& operator-(size_t n) 
    {
    	--myPos;
    	return fill();
    }


    const T& operator*() const
    {
    	return myVec[myIndex];
    }

    T& operator*()
    {
    	return myVec[myIndex];
    }



private:
    myRandomIterator& fill()
    {
    	myIndex = rand() % myVec.size();
    	return *this;
    }

private:
    size_t myIndex;
    std::vector<T>& myVec;
    size_t myPos;

};

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> a;
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
    {
    	a.push_back(i);
    }

    myRandomIterator<int> begin(a);
    myRandomIterator<int> end(a, a.size() * 0.4);

    std::random_shuffle(begin, end);

    return 0;
}
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Most elegant solution I think... but I would definitely use some Boost.Iterators there to alleviate the need for all the boiler-plate code. –  Matthieu M. Nov 4 '09 at 7:45

You could try this:

Assign a random number to each element of the vector. Shuffle the elements whose random number is in the smallest 10% of the random numbers you assigned: You could even imagine replacing that 10% in the vector with placeholders, then sort your 10% according to their random number, and insert them back into the vector where your placeholders are.

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If you have SGI's std::random_sample extension, you can do this. If not, it's easy to implement random_sample on top of a function which returns uniformly-distributed random integers in a specified range (Knuth, Volume 2, "Algorithm R").

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
using std::vector;

void shuffle_fraction(vector<int> &data, double fraction) {
    assert(fraction >= 0.0 && fraction <= 1.0);

    // randomly choose the indices to be shuffled
    vector<int> bag(data.size());
    for(int i = 0; i < bag.size(); ++i) bag[i] = i;

    vector<int> selected(static_cast<int>(data.size() * fraction));
    std::random_sample(bag.begin(), bag.end(), selected.begin(), selected.end());

    // take a copy of the values being shuffled
    vector<int> old_value(selected.size());
    for (int i = 0; i < selected.size(); ++i) {
        old_value[i] = data[selected[i]];
    }

    // choose a new order for the selected indices
    vector<int> shuffled(selected);
    std::random_shuffle(shuffled.begin(), shuffled.end());

    // apply the shuffle to the data: each of the selected indices
    // is replaced by the value for the corresponding shuffled indices
    for (int i = 0; i < selected.size(); ++i) {
        data[selected[i]] = old_value[shuffled[i]];
    }
}

Not the most efficient, since it uses three "small" vectors, but avoids having to adapt the Fisher-Yates algorithm to operate on a subset of the vector. In practice you'd probably want this to be a function template operating on a pair of random-access iterators rather than a vector. I haven't done that because I think it would obfuscate the code a little, and you didn't ask for it. I'd also take a size instead of a proportion, leaving it up to the caller to decide how to round fractions.

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