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I got the code below from google search as I am trying to learn multithreading. I run the code with CRITICAL SECTION is used and without CRITICAL SECTION, but after executing that both situations, i don't understand why the author of this code uses CRITICAL SECTION.

static unsigned int counter = 100;
static bool alive = true;
CRITICAL_SECTION cs;


static unsigned __stdcall Sub(void *args)
{
    while(alive)
    {
        EnterCriticalSection(&cs);
        cout << "[Sub(" << counter << ")]---" << endl;
        counter -= 10;
        LeaveCriticalSection(&cs);
        Sleep(500);
    }

    return 0;
}

static unsigned __stdcall Add(void *args)
{
    while(alive)
    {
        EnterCriticalSection(&cs);
        cout << "[Add(" << counter << ")]+++" << endl;
        counter += 10;
        LeaveCriticalSection(&cs);
        Sleep(500);
    }

    return 0;
}


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    InitializeCriticalSection(&cs);

    unsigned add;
    HANDLE hAdd = (HANDLE)_beginthreadex(0,0,&Add,0,CREATE_SUSPENDED, &add);
    assert(hAdd != 0);

    unsigned sub;
    HANDLE hSub = (HANDLE)_beginthreadex(0,0,&Sub,0,CREATE_SUSPENDED, &sub);
    assert(hSub != 0);

    //start threads
    ResumeThread(hAdd);
    ResumeThread(hSub);

    //let threads run for 10 seconds
    Sleep(3000); 

    alive = false;
    WaitForSingleObject(hSub, INFINITE);
    CloseHandle(hSub);
    WaitForSingleObject(hAdd, INFINITE);
    CloseHandle(hAdd);

    return 0;
}
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closed as not constructive by Vishal, Paras Joshi, Signare, Daniel Imms, tkanzakic May 22 '13 at 6:29

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4  
Because counter is shared between threads so the author added a critical section around the incrementing/decrementing of counter. You should read up on what a critical section is and multithreading a little more. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Critical_section –  user195488 May 21 '13 at 18:04
    
but when i execute the code without CRITICAL SECTION, i don't see any conflict using the "counter" though. –  Bopha May 21 '13 at 18:05
    
Remove any references to critical sections and run it with about 5 threads at once.. see if you have any contention. I am sure you will find that things get out of sync. This is just an example, it could be a file and then you'd be in big trouble. –  user195488 May 21 '13 at 18:07
    
ohh i see now. Based on this example, i won't see the true benefit of having CRITICAL SECTION, but if writing to a file that can be a problem. –  Bopha May 21 '13 at 18:10
    
I guess my question is stupid that is why i got voted down. –  Bopha May 21 '13 at 18:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A CRITICAL_SECTION is a simple sync mechanism for multi-threaded. You use a CRITICAL_SECTION to protect a block of code from having two or more threads running it at the same time.

You will not see a difference, with or without in most cases, it is there to protected shared resources from getting run over for example:

Imagine two threads accessing resource like a block of memory at the same time, one reading an image from it while the other is writing an image to it. The reading thread will get a corrupt image.

I suggest you do some more reading on multi-threaded to better understand the concepts and how to use synchronization objects to control the flow in multi-threaded applications.

  1. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/7953/Thread-Synchronization-for-Beginners
  2. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms681924(v=vs.85).aspx
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thanks, i will read through those articles and will change the code above to write to file instead to see if I can get some error. –  Bopha May 21 '13 at 18:13

You have two threads running in parallel, both reading (cout << "[Sub(" << counter << ")]---" << endl) and read/writing (counter -= 10) a shared variable. What do you think will happen if, between the read and the write, the other thread writes to the value? What if you were trying to make a decision based on the value of counter, when two different reads of the same variable might return different values?

The following sequence could (may or may not) occur:

thread SUB: read counter [say, 100]
thread ADD: read counter [100]
thread ADD: write counter <- 110
thread SUB: write counter <- 90

With the CRITICAL_SECTION, you have:

thread SUB: read counter [say, 100]
thread SUB: write counter <- 90
thread ADD: read counter [90]
thread ADD: write counter <- 100

OR you'd have:

thread ADD: read counter [100]
thread ADD: write counter <- 110
thread SUB: read counter [110]
thread SUB: write counter <- 100

Either way, with CRITICAL_SECTION, the end result is 100, where without you may end up with 90.

The CRITICAL_SECTION allows the block of code to be executed as a "unit of work" without interference by another thread blocking on the same CRITICAL_SECTION.

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thanks for your respond. Now I understand the situation little better now. –  Bopha May 21 '13 at 18:14

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