Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is there any way to make it work? See example :

class car {
        function __construct($type){
                switch ($type) {
                        case 'big' : return new big_car();
                        case 'small' : return new small_car();
                }
        }
        function whatisit () {
                echo "this is car ;( \n";
        }
}

class big_car extends car {
        function __construct(){}
        function whatisit () {
                echo "this is big car ;) \n";
        }
}

class small_car extends car {
        function __construct(){}
        function whatisit () {
                echo "this is small car ;) \n";
        }
}

so the goal is to use it this way:

$mycar = new car('big');
$mycar->whatisit(); // i want it to say that it's big

I guess very much that its bad way and it cannot work this way but maybe there is a trick?

PS:: I know I can use special static method for that but...

share|improve this question
    
Constructors can't return values in PHP; you'll need another method. – NullUserException May 21 '13 at 18:05
    
@kitty upvoted for your nick+avatar. – moonwave99 May 22 '13 at 0:05
    
You need to add a "car" interface and a "car" factory - trying to do them both together is ugly and hard. – Xeoncross May 22 '13 at 0:06
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You need a car factory to create new cars; this is not JavaScript :)

class car_factory 
{
    function create_car($type = null) 
    {
        switch ($type) {
             case 'big':
                 return new big_car();

             case 'small':
                 return new small_car();

             case null:
                 return new car();
        }
        throw new InvalidArgumentException($type);
    }
}

$factory = new car_factory;
$small_car = $factory->create_car('small');
$std_car = $factory->create_car();

Of course, you should remove the __construct function from your original code.

As mentioned in the comments you could completely generalize this by using dynamic classes, assuming class extensions have the same constructor and class naming is consistent:

class car_factory
{
    function create_car($type = null)
    {
        if (is_null($type)) {
            return new car();
        }

        $class = "{$type}_car";
        if (class_exists($class)) {
            $obj = new $class();

            if ($obj instanceof car) {
                return $obj;
            }
        }

        throw new InvalidArgumentException($type);
    }
}

Personally I have no preferences either way; if extensibility is a key factor, go for it, otherwise stick with a simple switch.

share|improve this answer
    
To behave the way he wanted I believe it should return new car(); when the argument is not big or small, instead of throwing an exception. – Paulpro May 21 '13 at 18:06
    
@Paulpro Good point :) added. – Ja͢ck May 21 '13 at 18:08
    
Looks good :) Nice edit. – Paulpro May 21 '13 at 18:12
1  
This example is not very extensible. If you add other types, you'll need to change class implementation. You could try to do the instanciation based on the parameter $type: $class = "{$type}_car"; return new $class(). In this case, all you'll have to do is maintain the naming convention. – Henrique Barcelos May 21 '13 at 23:08
1  
@HenriqueBarcelos Added to the answer. – Ja͢ck May 21 '13 at 23:52

[...]you could completely generalize this by using dynamic classes, assuming class extensions have the same constructor and class naming is consistent

You can add even more flexibility using Reflection:

class car_factory
{
    function create_car($class = null, $constructorArgs = array())
    {
        if (is_null($class)) {
            return new car();
        }

        try {
           $refl = new ReflectionClass($class);
           if (!$refl->isSubclassOf('car') {
               throw new DomainException("Type: {$class} is not a car type");
           }
           return $refl->newIntanceArgs($constructorArgs);
        } catch(ReflectionException $e) {
           throw new DomainException("Invalid car type: {$class}");
        }
    }
}

Now use:

$factory = new car_factory();
$car1 = $factory->create_car('big_car');
$car2 = $factory->create_car('small_car');
$car3 = $factory->create_car('fancy_car_name_with_constructor_args', array("I'm fancy!"));
share|improve this answer
    
Also, if you want to just pass objects you can skip the relfection and use type-hinting: function __construct(\Car $car) { $this->car = $car; } – Xeoncross May 22 '13 at 0:15
    
In this case you'd have to instantiate an object and pass it to the factory, so, what is the factory for? – Henrique Barcelos May 22 '13 at 6:24
    
Yes, I wasn't talking about this specific case - just posting that for anyone that might be reading over this answer. It's actually DI design instead of a factory pattern which seems to be better for testing anyway. – Xeoncross May 22 '13 at 14:19
    
Why do you say that DI Design is better than Factory Method for testing? – Henrique Barcelos May 22 '13 at 14:57
    
Because most factories have more connections to the objects they are creating that containers which only define a type of object they are expecting. – Xeoncross May 22 '13 at 15:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.