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While reading about realloc() I have stumbled upon some doubts which I need to clarify rather than ignore.Your answers are very much sought.I have put them in a numbered list for clarity.Please don't mind the length of this question.

1) While using realloc(),if the memory block with its contents are moved to a new location,does the orignal address gets deallocated as if we called free() on it?I've read the following from cplusplusreference about realloc,but though they come close to suggesting that the original memory block do get deallocated in such a case,yet I need your confirmation.

->C90 (C++98)C99/C11 (C++11) Otherwise, if size is zero, the memory previously allocated at ptr is deallocated as if a call to free was made, and a null pointer is returned.

->If the function fails to allocate the requested block of memory, a null pointer is returned, and the memory block pointed to by argument ptr is not deallocated (it is still valid, and with its contents unchanged).

2) Here's another line that raise questions: "If the new size is larger, the value of the newly allocated portion is indeterminate.".Well,here is what I want to know

i) Is it allowed to write into that newly allocated portion?

ii) Is the newly allocated portion filled using garbage values?

3) And finally,What if pass an array object to realloc()?I ask because,though type will still be char*,it is mentioned in the source site that, the argument should be "Pointer to a memory block previously allocated with malloc, calloc or realloc.Will it be UB here too,as I read in free()'s description that for free() "If ptr does not point to a block of memory allocated with the above functions, it causes undefined behavior."

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I have been advised not to use cplusplusreference.But the advice was recent while I've been taking notes from that site since a month.Hence it will take a while to transition!!And well,it's not that bad :-) !! –  Jugni May 21 '13 at 18:18

1 Answer 1

1) While using realloc(),if the memory block with its contents are moved to a new location,does the orignal address gets deallocated as if we called free() on it?

Yes, if realloc() returns a pointer to a different location, the old location is freed.

It is not freed if realloc fails to obtain a large enough block of memory and returns NULL.

2) Here's another line that raise questions: "If the new size is larger, the value of the newly allocated portion is indeterminate.".Well,here is what I want to know

i) Is it allowed to write into that newly allocated portion?

Yes, sure. That's the entire point of reallocating a larger block of memory.

ii) Is the newly allocated portion filled using garbage values?

Filled with garbage, not filled at all - the contents of the memory block are indeterminate, except for the part that was copied from the old block. You should not care what bits there are, put your own stuff there before reading from it.

3) And finally,What if pass an array object to realloc()? I ask because,though type will still be char*,it is mentioned in the source site that, the argument should be "Pointer to a memory block previously allocated with malloc, calloc or realloc. Will it be UB here too,as I read in free()'s description that for free()

Yes, if you pass an argument (except NULL) to realloc that was not obtained from a previous call to malloc, calloc or realloc (without having been freed since), the behaviour is undefined.

The pointers that may legitimately be passed to realloc are exactly the same that may be passed to free.

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+1 Thanks Sir.I doubt if I will be getting any answer more precise than this.You didn't miss anything that I asked. –  Jugni May 21 '13 at 18:30

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