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I working with C++11 and have a Class containing the following Struct:

struct Settings{
    const std::string name;

    const std::string* A;
    const size_t a;
};

class X {
    static const Settings s;
    //More stuff
};

In the .cpp file I want to define it like this

X::s = {"MyName", {"one","two","three"}, 3};

But this does not work. However it does work using an intermediate variable

const std::string inter[] = {"one","two","three"};
X::s = {"MyName", inter, 3};

Is there a way to do it without the intermediate variable?

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3  
Your struct does not contain a const array. It contains a pointer to a const string. With that in mind, it should be easy to see why you need the "intermediate variable". –  juanchopanza May 21 '13 at 18:29
    
@juanchopanza: Well, I want A to point to (the beginning of) a const Array. It could also be a pointer to a const std::string, but thats not what I want. But maybe I don't quite get what you are pointing at... –  Haatschii May 21 '13 at 18:32
1  
@Haatschii: you're confusing the fact that an array decays into a pointer with the idea that an array and a pointer are identical. In terms of the language semantics, an array is not a pointer. Likewise, an initializer list is not an array. The compiler can initialize an array with such a list, and it can decay an array into a pointer, but it doesn't know in your example to convert the list into an array and then decay that to a pointer. Hence the need for the intermediary, to get the initializer list converted to a contiguous array before assigning to the pointer. –  Sean Middleditch May 21 '13 at 20:26
    
@SeanMiddleditch Ok, thanks for pointing that out. –  Haatschii May 22 '13 at 3:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A pointer cannot be initialized from a list of values. You could use std::vector instead:

#include <vector>

struct Settings{
    const std::string name;
    const std::vector<std::string> A;
//        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    const size_t a;
};

You can then write:

class X {
    static const Settings s;
    //More stuff
};

const Settings X::s = {"MyName", {"one","two","three"}, 3};

Here is a live example.

As suggested by Praetorian in the comments, you may want to replace std::vector with std::array, if it is acceptable for you to specify the size of the container explicitly, and if the size does not need to change at run-time:

#include <array>

struct Settings{
    const std::string name;
    const std::array<std::string, 3> A;
//        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    const size_t a;
};

And here is the live example.

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1  
Could you explain why using vector makes the difference? –  taocp May 21 '13 at 18:32
1  
@taocp: Because a pointer cannot be initialized with a list of values. What you want is something that can be initialized from an initializer list –  Andy Prowl May 21 '13 at 18:33
3  
Or std::array<std::string, 3> if you don't need for it to be resizable. –  Praetorian May 21 '13 at 18:33
    
@Praetorian: Indeed, if the user accepts to write the size explicitly –  Andy Prowl May 21 '13 at 18:33
    
@AndyProwl Thank you, agreed! –  taocp May 21 '13 at 18:34

That's because you're storing a pointer to an array of strings, not the strings themselves; so you need an array of strings somewhere to point to. All you have is a brace-initialiser containing pointers to character arrays.

If you were to store the strings themselves (in a vector<string>, for example), then the first version would work.

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