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I am working on design a wrapper class to provide RAII function. The original use case is as follows:

void* tid(NULL);
OpenFunc(&tid);
CloseFunc(&tid);

After I introduce a new wrapper class, I expect the future usage will be as follows:

void* tid(NULL);
TTTA(tid);

or

TTTB(tid);

Question:

Which implementation TTTA or TTTB is better? Or they are all bad and please introduce a better one.

One thing I have concern is that after the resource is allocated, the id will be accessed outside of class TTTA or TTTB until the id is destroyed. Based on my understanding, my design should not have side-effect for that.

Thank you

class TTTA : boost::noncopyable
{
public:
    explicit TTTA(void *id)
        : m_id(id)
    {
        OpenFunc(&m_id); // third-party allocate resource API
    }

    ~TTTA()
    {
        CloseFunc(&m_id); // third-party release resource API
    }   
private:
    void* &m_id; // have to store the value in order to release in destructor
}

class TTTB : boost::noncopyable
{
public:
    explicit TTTB(void *id)
        : m_id(&id)
    {
        OpenFunc(m_id); // third-party allocate resource API
    }

    ~TTTB()
    {
        CloseFunc(m_id); // third-party release resource API
    }   
private:
    void** m_id; // have to store the value in order to release in destructor
}

// pass-in pointers comparison

class TTTD
{
public:
    TTTD(int* id)    // Take as reference, do not copy to stack.
        : m_id(&id)
    {
        *m_id = new int(40);
    }

private:
    int** m_id; 
};


class TTTC
{
public:
    TTTC(int* &id)    
        : m_id(id)
    {
        m_id = new int(30);
    }

private:
    int* &m_id; 
};

class TTTB
{
public:
    TTTB(int* id)    
        : m_id(id)
    {
        m_id = new int(20);
    }

private:
    int* &m_id; 
};

class TTTA
{
public:
    TTTA(int** id)    
        : m_id(id)
    {
        *m_id = new int(10);
    }

private:
    int** m_id; 
};


int main()
{
    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    int *pA(NULL);
    TTTA a(&pA);
    cout << *pA << endl; // 10

    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    int *pB(NULL);
    TTTB b(pB);
    //cout << *pB << endl; // wrong

    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    int *pC(NULL);
    TTTC c(pC);
    cout << *pC << endl; // 30

    //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    int *pD(NULL);
    TTTD d(pD);
    cout << *pD << endl; // wrong
}
share|improve this question
    
In C++, you generally use references to modify objects from within a function. –  user529758 May 21 '13 at 19:04
1  
Based on my understanding, both TTTA and TTTB is equivalent. –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 19:08
    
No, the one uses a reference, the other uses a pointer. –  user529758 May 21 '13 at 19:09
    
Both void** and void*& can modify the pass-in id in the same way. –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 19:13
    
Not in the same way, but they can. References are not pointers. –  user529758 May 21 '13 at 19:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Both break in bad ways.

TTTA stores a reference to a variable (the parameter id) that's stored on the stack.
TTTB stores a pointer to a variable that's stored on the stack.

Both times, the variable goes out of scope when the constructor returns.

EDIT: Since you want the values modifiable, the simplest fix is to take the pointer as a reference; that will make TTTC reference the actual pointer instead of the local copy made when taking the pointer as a non reference parameter;

class TTTC : boost::noncopyable
{
public:
    explicit TTTA(void *&id)    // Take as reference, do not copy to stack.
        : m_id(id)
...
private:
    void* &m_id; // have to store the value in order to release in destructor
}

The simple test that breaks your versions is to add a print method to the classes to print the pointer value and do;

int main() {

  void* a = (void*)0x200;
  void* b = (void*)0x300;

  {
    TTTA ta(a);
    TTTA tb(b);

    ta.print();
    tb.print();
  }
}

Both TTTA and TTTB print both values as 0x300 on my machine. Of course, the result is really UB; so your result may vary.

share|improve this answer
    
Your simple fix doesn't work for me. If you take void* m_id as the pass-in parameter, you are not able to modify the pass-in parameter. Also I expect the outside tid is void when the object of TTTA returns. For your example, I don't understand what the problem is since the print is called inside the scope and the result should be valid. –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 19:42
1  
@q0987 See my edit for a modifiable version. The problem with TTTA/TTTB is that both take the pointer as a non reference parameter, that means it's copied to the stack in the constructor, a pointer/reference is taken to the location on the stack and when the constructor returns, the pointer/reference is left dangling. If you take the parameter as a reference, the passed in pointer is instead the one pointed to. –  Joachim Isaksson May 21 '13 at 19:49
    
I have updated my OP and based on your comments, now I know my both TTTA and TTTB are wrong! –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 20:18
    
@q0987 If your question is still which is better, it's a matter of taste and what you find more readable. I prefer the reference syntax, since it avoids the "how many asterisks to dereference this pointer to pointer to something" puzzles that tend to slow me down. –  Joachim Isaksson May 21 '13 at 21:34

Why do you tid at all? It’s leaking information to the client and makes the usage twice as long (two lines instead of one):

class tttc {
    void* id;

public:

    tttc() {
        OpenFunc(&id);
    }

    ~tttc() {
        CloseFunc(&id);
    }

    tttc(tttc const&) = delete;
    tttc& operator =(tttc const&) = delete;
};

Note that this class forbids copying – your solutions break the rule of three.

If you require access to id from the outside, provide a conversion inside tttc:

void* get() const { return id; }

Or, if absolutely necessary, via an implicit conversion:

operator void*() const { return id; }

(But use that one judiciously since implicit conversions weaken the type system and may lead to hard to diagnose bugs.)

And then there’s std::unique_ptr in the standard library which, with a custom deleter, actually achieves the same and additionally implements the rule of three properly.

share|improve this answer
    
b/c the tid is used in other functions and I don't wrapper those function inside the wrapper class. –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 19:14
    
@q0987 Then provide a conversion from tttc. See update. –  Konrad Rudolph May 21 '13 at 19:15
    
Do you mean wrap the tid inside the TTT class and provide an accessor/getter function that returns the id? I am not sure this is a good idea. Since the other API may also modify tid. –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 19:17
    
@q0987 Yes. Like I said, see the updated answer. This is a good idea. So much so that it’s part of the standard library (again: std::unique_ptr does exactly that.) –  Konrad Rudolph May 21 '13 at 19:18
    
unique_ptr is not an option. We use VS2010. –  q0987 May 21 '13 at 19:19

What about wrapping it completely? This way you do not have to worry about managing the lifecycles of two variables, but only one.

class TTTC
{
    void* m_id;
public:
    TTTC()
        : m_id(nullptr)
    {
        OpenFunc(&m_id); // third-party allocate resource API
    }

    TTTC(TTTC const&) = delete; // or ensure copying does what you expect

    void*const& tid() const { return m_id; }

    ~TTTC()
    {
        CloseFunc(&m_id); // third-party release resource API
    }
};

Using it is simplicity itself:

TTTC wrapped;
DoSomethingWithTid(wrapped.tid());
share|improve this answer

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