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I have the following global variable declared early on in the script:

var ddFinished = 0;

This if statement should be false, but for some reason, it's executed as if it's true:

$(this).click(function(){
            if (ddFinished = 3){
                $(this).find('.dd_chosen_answer').remove();
                $(this).removeClass("dd_question_dropped");
                $(this).droppable( "enable" );
            }
            else {
                $(this).droppable( "disable" );
            }
});

Is there something wrong with my syntax here? The goal is to give myself a variable I can use to toggle whether or not this element will become droppable on click.

In theory (my theory), this should work, but the if is executed, event though it shouldn't be according to its circumstance. The variable ddFinished isn't declared or changed anywhere else on the script currently.

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closed as too localized by bfavaretto, Paulpro, Kevin B, Pointy, dsg May 21 '13 at 20:56

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9  
if (ddFinished = 3) should be if (ddFinished == 3) –  bfavaretto May 21 '13 at 20:55
    
It should be if (ddFinished === 3). == is never needed and always wrong. –  Halcyon May 21 '13 at 20:56
    
No, it's not debatable. Give me an example of a use of == and I'll tell you why it's wrong. –  Halcyon May 21 '13 at 20:56
1  
@FritsvanCampen if (something == null) works for both null and undefined, and that's a very common situation. –  Pointy May 21 '13 at 20:57
    
Anytime you know the type at one side of the comparison, comparing types is not needed. E.g., typeof somevar == "undefined". –  bfavaretto May 21 '13 at 20:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It should be

if(ddFinished === 3)
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2  
this is the reason old school C programmers used to write if checks like if (3 == ddFinished), because if (3 = ddFinished) wouldn't compile. –  Mike Corcoran May 21 '13 at 20:56
    
that's right. Because "if (ddFinish = 3 )" assign the value 3 to the variable. –  Nettogrof May 21 '13 at 20:56
    
@MikeCorcoran good point, in JavaScript editors you'd get an error message ... –  alexfreiria May 21 '13 at 20:57
    
@Xander i know, i was just throwing it out how long this has been a common problem. –  Mike Corcoran May 21 '13 at 20:58
2  
@MikeCorcoran See stackoverflow.com/a/15094657/825789 –  bfavaretto May 21 '13 at 20:59

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