Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, I've got a conceptual question. I've been working with JNI on Android for the purposes of doing low-level audio "stuff." I've done plenty of audio coding in C/C++, so I figured that this would not be much of a problem. I decided to do use C++ in my "native" code (because who doesn't love OOP?). The issue I've encountered seems (to me) to be a strange one: when I create an object for processing audio in the C++ code, and I never pass this object to Java (nor the other way around), calling methods on this object seems to invoke the garbage collection quite often. Since this is happening inside audio callbacks, the result is stuttering audio, and I get frequent messages along the lines of:

WAIT_FOR_CONCURRENT_GC blocked 23ms

However, when I perform the same operations by creating static functions (rather than invoking member methods on a memeber object) the performance of the app seems to be fine, and I no longer see the above log message.

Basically, is there any reason calling a static function should have better performance than calling member methods on a member object in native code? More specifically, are member objects, or limited scope variables that live entirely inside the native code of a JNI project involved in garbage collection? Is the C++ call stack involved in GC? Is there any insight anybody can give me on how C++ memory management meets Java memory management when it comes to JNI programming? That is, in the case that I'm not passing data between Java and C++, does the way I write C++ code affect Java memory management (GC or otherwise)?

Allow me to try to give an example. Bear with me, 'cause it's freaking long, and if you think you have insight you're welcome to stop reading here.

I have a couple of objects. One that is responsible for creating the audio engine, initializing output, etc. It is called HelloAudioJNI (sorry for not putting compile-able examples, but there's a lot of code).

class CHelloAudioJNI {

    ... omitted members ...

    //member object pointers
    COscillator *osc;
    CWaveShaper *waveShaper;

    ... etc ...

public:
    //some methods
    void init(float fs, int bufferSize, int channels);

    ... blah blah blah ...

It follows that I have a couple more classes. The WaveShaper class looks like this:

class CWaveShaper : public CAudioFilter {
protected:
    double *coeffs;
    unsigned int order;//order
public:
    CWaveShaper(const double sampleRate, const unsigned int numChannels,
                double *coefficients, const unsigned int order);

    double processSample(double input, unsigned int channel);
    void reset();
};

Let's not worry about the CAudioFilter class for now, since this example is already quite long. The WaveShaper .cpp file looks like this:

CWaveShaper::CWaveShaper(const double sampleRate,
                         const unsigned int numChannels,
                         double *coefficients,
                         const unsigned int numCoeffs) :
    CAudioFilter(sampleRate,numChannels), coeffs(coefficients), order(numCoeffs)
{}

double CWaveShaper::processSample(double input, unsigned int channel)
{
    double output = 0;
    double pow = input;

    //zeroth order polynomial:
    output = pow * coeffs[0];

    //each additional iteration
    for(int iteration = 1; iteration < order; iteration++){
        pow *= input;
        output += pow * coeffs[iteration];
    }

    return output;
}

void CWaveShaper::reset() {}

and then there's HelloAudioJNI.cpp. This is where we get into the meat of the issue. I create the member objects properly, using new inside the init function, thusly:

void CHelloAudioJNI::init(float samplerate, int bufferSize, int channels)
{
    ... some omitted initialization code ...

        //wave shaper numero uno
    double coefficients[2] = {1.0/2.0, 3.0/2.0};
    waveShaper = new CWaveShaper(fs,outChannels,coefficients,2);

    ... some more omitted code ...
}

Ok everything seems fine so far. Then inside the audio callback we call some member methods on the member object like so:

void CHelloAudioJNI::processOutputBuffer()
{
    //compute audio using COscillator object
    for(int index = 0; index < outputBuffer.bufferLen; index++){
        for(int channel = 0; channel < outputBuffer.numChannels; channel++){
            double sample;

            //synthesize
            sample = osc->computeSample(channel);
            //wave-shape
            sample = waveShaper->processSample(sample,channel);

            //convert to FXP and save to output buffer
            short int outputSample = amplitude * sample * FLOAT_TO_SHORT;
            outputBuffer.buffer[interleaveIndex(index,channel)] = outputSample;
        }
    }
}

This is what produces frequent audio interruptions and lots of messages about garbage collection. However, if I copy the CWaveShaper::processSample() function to the HelloAudioJNI.cpp immediately above the callback and call it directly instead of the member function:

sample = waveShape(sample, coeff, 2);

Then I get beautiful beautiful audio coming out of my android device and I do not get such frequent messages about garbage collection. Once again the questions are, are member objects, or limited scope variables that live entirely inside the native code of a JNI project involved in garbage collection? Is the C++ call stack involved in GC? Is there any insight anybody can give me on how C++ memory management meets Java memory management when it comes to JNI programming? That is, in the case that I'm not passing data between Java and C++, does the way I write C++ code affect Java memory management (GC or otherwise)?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

CHelloAudioJNI::init(...) stores a pointer to a stack variable (double coefficients[2]) in waveShaper. When you access waveShaper->coeffs after coefficients has gone out of scope, BadThings(tm) happens.

Make a copy of the array in your CWaveShaper constructor (and don't forget to delete it in your destructor). Or use std::array.

share|improve this answer
    
This may be tangential, as coefficients sound like something that would be read, but not written. So the values when accessed might be indeterminate, but it's not immediately clear that stack corruption would occur. –  Chris Stratton May 22 '13 at 2:10
    
@ChrisStratton, can you explain your comment? I don't understand what you mean. –  xaviersjs May 22 '13 at 14:52
    
The issue raised here is something you should fix as the values of the coefficients accessed from no longer allocated memory are likely to be incorrect. But unless you later try to alter the coefficients, this would not cause improper program flow, which seems to be the only explanation for your garbage collection implicitly offered by this answer. If you only read the coefficients to use in a calculation which is valid for all inputs, then "BadThings(tm)" is confined to "wrong calculation results" –  Chris Stratton May 22 '13 at 14:55

There is no relationship between C++ objects and Dalvik's garbage collection. Dalvik has no interest in the contents of the native heap, other than for its own internal storage. All objects created from Java sources live on the "managed" heap, which is where garbage collection takes place.

The Dalvik GC does not examine the native stack; each thread known to the VM has a separate stack for the interpreter to use.

The only way C++ and managed objects are related is if you choose to create a relationship by pairing objects in some way (e.g. creating a new managed object from a C++ constructor, or deleting a native object from a Java finalizer).

You can use the "Allocation Tracker" feature of DDMS / ADT to see the most-recently created objects on the managed heap, and from where they are being allocated. If you run that during the GC flurry you should be able to tell what's causing it.

Also, the logcat messages show the process and thread IDs (from the command line use, adb logcat -v threadtime), which you should check to make sure that the messages are coming from your app, and also to see which thread the GC activity is occurring on. You can see the thread names in the "Threads" tab in DDMS / ADT.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.