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I want to be able to insert an element in the middle (or another location) in the vector without overwriting existing element.

Say my vector has 3 6 9 10 and I want to insert 7 right after 6. How should it be done without causing issues? It's very infrequent operation so efficiency is not a problem here. Also, at this point, I cannot switch to another container ( for example: std::list) that are good for insertions in the middle.

Will std::insert in vector do what I want? How?

thanks

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1  
You can't insert element in the "middle" of a vector without overwriting all elements after the position of insertion: they will be moved at the end of the vector to leave room for the new element (element n will be copied at n+1, element n-1 will be copied at n, etc. thus overriding existing elements). –  Julien-L Nov 3 '09 at 15:37
1  
Which, of course, means that any existing iterators and pointers into the vector will be invalidated (as they can be after a plain old push_back(), for that matter). –  ceo Nov 3 '09 at 16:17
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is vector::insert for this operation.

iterator insert(
   iterator _Where,
   const Type& _Val
);
void insert(
   iterator _Where,
   size_type _Count,
   const Type& _Val
);
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I've edited the example to insert '7' directly after '6' as the question is more about inserting at a specific location than arbitrarily at the centre of the vector.

std::vector<int> v;
v.push_back(3);
v.push_back(6);
v.push_back(9);
v.push_back(10);
std::vector<int>::iterator insert_pos = std::find(v.begin(), v.end(), 6);
// only increment iterator if we've found the insertion point,
// otherwise insert at the end of the vector
if (insert_pos != v.end()) {
    ++insert_pos;
}
v.insert(insert_pos, 7);
// v now contains 3, 6, 7, 9, 10
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Maybe add a line where you find the index to insert? –  Bill Nov 3 '09 at 16:17
    
Yeah I originally focused on the 'in the middle' part of the question a bit too literally I think :) –  irh Nov 3 '09 at 17:56
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Using both vector::find and vector::insert, as per the above comments, gives the following code:

std::vector<int> v;
v.push_back(3);
v.push_back(6);
v.push_back(9);
v.push_back(10);
std::vector<int>::iterator pos = std::find(v.begin(),v.end(), 6);
v.insert(pos, 7);
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This doesn't compile - find isn't a member of std::vector, only of the associative containers. You need to use std::find to find the insertion point. –  irh Nov 3 '09 at 18:04
1  
Sorry, pre-coffee answer. Fixed to use std::find instead. –  Adrian Park Nov 3 '09 at 18:53
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If your vector is ordered, you can optimise the insert somewhat by avoiding the linear search:

std::vector<int> v;
v.push_back(3);
v.push_back(6);
v.push_back(9);
v.push_back(10);

std::insert(std::upper_bound(v.begin(), v.end(), 7), 7);
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Maybe you should have said that it needs #include <algorithm>, but it's just what I want, thanks +1. –  Oriol Oct 15 '12 at 18:58
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You probably want to use your vector's insert member function.

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Mash's example code is to the point (but be careful that it will insert where you're expecting with an odd size). Also, even though you said efficiency is not an issue, you might consider using vector's reserve() member function to avoid reallocation and hidden copying. ("Don't pessimize prematurely", as Sutter and Alexandrescu say in C++ Coding Standards.)

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