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The aim is to calculate the distance matrix between two sets of points (set1 and set2), use argsort() to obtain the sorted indexes and take() to extract the sorted array. I know I could do a sort() directly, but I need the indexes for some next steps.

I am using the fancy indexing concepts discussed here. I could not manage to use take() directly with the obtained matrix of indexes, but adding to each row a corresponding quantity makes it work, because take() flattens the source array making the second row elements with an index += len(set2), the third row index += 2*len(set2) and so forth (see below):

dist  = np.subtract.outer( set1[:,0], set2[:,0] )**2
dist += np.subtract.outer( set1[:,1], set2[:,1] )**2
dist += np.subtract.outer( set1[:,2], set2[:,2] )**2
a = np.argsort( dist, axis=1 )
a += np.array([[ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  0],
               [10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10],
               [20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20],
               [30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30, 30]])
s1 = np.sort(dist,axis=1)
s2 = np.take(dist,a)
np.nonzero((s1-s2)) == False
#True # meaning that it works...

The main question is: is there a direct way to use take() without summing these indexes?

Data to play with:

set1 = np.array([[ 250., 0.,    0.],
                 [ 250., 0.,  510.],
                 [-250., 0.,    0.],
                 [-250., 0.,    0.]])

set2 = np.array([[  61.0, 243.1, 8.3],
                 [ -43.6, 246.8, 8.4],
                 [ 102.5, 228.8, 8.4],
                 [  69.5, 240.9, 8.4],
                 [ 133.4, 212.2, 8.4],
                 [ -52.3, 245.1, 8.4],
                 [-125.8, 216.8, 8.5],
                 [-154.9, 197.1, 8.6],
                 [  61.0, 243.1, 8.7],
                 [ -26.2, 249.3, 8.7]])

Other related questions:

- Euclidean distance between points in two different Numpy arrays, not within

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think there is a way to use np.take without going to flat indices. Since dimensions are likely to change, you are better off using np.ravel_multi_index for that, doing something like this:

a = np.argsort(dist, axis=1)
a = np.ravel_multi_index((np.arange(dist.shape[0])[:, None], a), dims=dist.shape)

Alternatively, you can use fancy indexing without using take:

s2 = dist[np.arange(4)[:, None], a]
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