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I'm making a networked Battleship game for a school project. The GUI features a grid of JButtons that serves as the game board. When the user clicks a button, it calls the sendShot() method below. This method sends their shot to the remote machine, which checks if its a hit or a miss and returns the result. The first machine then receives that result and updates its GUI accordingly. The code I have below is doing this, but I the problem is that the GUI is not being updated until after the other machine sends their next shot. I'm guessing this is because I'm calling recieveShot() from within the sendShot() method, but I'm not 100% clear on why, since the method for updating the GUI (gp.ob.updateBoard(sr))) is called before receiveShot(). What am I misunderstanding here?

Further, I have a feeling that my basic program-flow method here is flawed, and that receiveShot() should not be called from the sendShot() method. Are there any obvious alternatives to this scheme?

void sendShot(ShotAttempt sa){

    try {
       oos.writeObject(sa);
       oos.flush();
       System.out.println("shot fired");
       ShotResult sr = (ShotResult)ois.readObject();
       gp.ob.updateBoard(sr); 
    } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException e) {
        System.out.println(e.printStackTrace());}
      receiveShot();
}

void receiveShot(){
    try{
    ShotAttempt sa = (ShotAttempt)ois.readObject();
    ShotResult sr = gp.db.acceptShot(sa);
    oos.writeObject(sr);
    oos.flush();
    } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException e){e.printStackTrace();}
}
share|improve this question
    
This may not have anything to do with it, but you're reading the ShotResult twice from the stream...once in sendShot and once again in recieveShot. Also, we might need to see more of the code before we can deduce the overall problem... –  MadProgrammer May 22 '13 at 1:44
    
can you please paste the SSCCE for quick help. –  Ashish May 22 '13 at 1:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

the GUI is not being updated until after the other machine sends their next shot. I'm guessing this is because I'm calling recieveShot() from within the sendShot() method, but I'm not 100% clear on why, since the method for updating the GUI (gp.ob.updateBoard(sr))) is called before receiveShot().

The receiveShot() method blocks the Swing event dispatch thread or EDT. Since this thread is responsible for all Swing graphics, user interactions, and Swing event processing, none the Runnables queued on the event Thread and awaiting processing will be processed, even if they were queued before the receiveShot() method was called. They can only be processed when the thread is unblocked, which will be after you've received a shot.

Suggestions:

  • You should do all your socket communication on background threads.
  • I would create program states, perhaps held by an enum, say called State, and give it at least two possible values, SHOOTING AND RECEIVING.
  • Set your State appropriately after sending a shot to be State.RECEIVING.
  • Set back to State.SHOOTING after receiving a shot.
  • Don't allow the player to send a shot while in the receiving state. This way your code won't require a blocking method to prevent the user from shooting.
  • You could also have an END_GAME as one of your states.
  • I would give my class a setState(State state) method.
  • In this method, I could enable/disable my shooting buttons depending on the new state.
  • You would need one background thread, probably a SwingWorker, running continuously, listening on the socket for messages. When this thread receives info that it has been shot, it then update's the program's state by calling setState(newState).
  • I would take care to call setState on the Swing event thread so that state changes are all done by one thread only.
  • I would then call shoot on a separate background thread, but one that only exists to do the shooting. It would not be continuously running.

For more information on the Swing Event Dispatch Thread, please have a look at Concurrency in Swing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'm trying to wrap my head around what you suggested: So when would the state get checked? –  user2356560 May 22 '13 at 1:57
    
@user2356560: You could check the state whenever the user tries to shoot, when he presses a button. If the state isn't State.SHOOTING, then the button press does nothing. Alternatively, you could listen for the State to change, and if the state isn't State.SHOOTING, you could disable the buttons via setEnabled(false) and visa versa when the state changes back. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 '13 at 2:07
    
"Alternatively, you could listen for the State to change" How do I listen for state changes? What construct can I use? –  user2356560 May 22 '13 at 2:43
    
Are we talking about concurrency/synchronization here, because this is a topic I'm just familiarizing myself with... –  user2356560 May 22 '13 at 2:46
1  
Thanks, got it working nicely :) –  user2356560 May 22 '13 at 4:38

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