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Employees with no subordinates should be listed as having zero subordinates should also be displayed by this query. I can currently return all employees with subordinates, but I can't seem to display employees with zero subordinates.

Here is the code so far:

SELECT s.empno, s.ename, COUNT(*) as "Num_subordinates"
FROM emp e
JOIN emp s ON s.empno=e.super 
GROUP BY s.empno, s.ename;
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3 Answers 3

The only missing in your statement is to use LEFT JOIN rather than INNER JOIN. You also need to specify the ID instead of * when counting in LEFT JOIN so you will not yield 1 on the COUNT() if the employee don't have subordinate.

SELECT e.empno, e.ename, COUNT(s.empno) as "Num_subordinates"
FROM   emp e
       LEFT JOIN emp s ON s.empno = e.super 
GROUP  BY e.empno, e.ename

To further gain more knowledge about joins, kindly visit the link below:

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Try this, you need to group the records using e not s. and counting COUNT(s.empno). –  John Woo May 22 '13 at 2:26
    
@Bohemian yeah right. I was looking at the GROUP BY clause and forget to change also on the SELECT.. –  John Woo May 22 '13 at 2:36
    
On second thoughts I think it was correct and the group by is wrong - he needs a right join: s = super, not subordinate. Ps group by 1, 2 would have been right first time ;-) –  Bohemian May 22 '13 at 2:39

UPDATED

Assuming that data is similar to the following

| EMPNO |     ENAME |  SUPER |
------------------------------
|     1 |  Manager1 | (null) |
|     2 | Employee1 |      1 |
|     3 | Employee2 |      1 |
|     4 | Employee3 |      1 |
|     5 |  Manager2 | (null) |
|     6 | Employee5 |      5 |
|     7 | Employee6 | (null) |

A version with a subquery

SELECT e.empno, 
       e.ename, 
       (SELECT COUNT(*) 
          FROM emp 
         WHERE super = e.empno) "Num_subordinates"
  FROM emp e;

A version with a JOIN. You have to use LEFT JOIN since INNER JOIN filters out necessary rows and as JW correctly pointed out you need to COUNT on s.empno rather then *.

SELECT e.empno,
       e.ename,
       COUNT(s.empno) "Num_subordinates"
  FROM emp e LEFT JOIN emp s
    ON s.super = e.empno
 GROUP BY e.empno, e.ename
 ORDER BY e.empno

Output for both queries

| EMPNO |     ENAME | NUM_SUBORDINATES |
----------------------------------------
|     1 |  Manager1 |                3 |
|     2 | Employee1 |                0 |
|     3 | Employee2 |                0 |
|     4 | Employee3 |                0 |
|     5 |  Manager2 |                1 |
|     6 | Employee5 |                0 |
|     7 | Employee6 |                0 |

SQLFiddle (for both queries)

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This doesn't work. THe only difference with this code is it returns an extra row with null for empno and ename, and 1 for subordinate number –  user2407714 May 22 '13 at 2:21
    
@user2407714 See the updated answer. If your data is different then please consider to post sample data in your original question. –  peterm May 22 '13 at 3:04
    
@user2407714 Did it help? –  peterm May 22 '13 at 3:42

A few solutions for you problem:

1) grouped auto-join:

SELECT s.empno, s.ename, COUNT(*) as "Num_subordinates"
FROM emp e RIGHT JOIN emp s ON s.empno=e.super 
GROUP BY s.empno, s.ename;

2) left join with aggregate subordinate counts:

SELECT s.*, c.num_subordinates as "Num_subordinates"
FROM emp s LEFT JOIN (SELECT super AS empno, COUNT(*) FROM emp GROUP BY super) AS c
  ON c.empno = s.empno;

or using CTE:

WITH c AS (SELECT super AS empno, COUNT(*) FROM emp GROUP BY super)
SELECT s.*, c.num_subordinates as "Num_subordinates"
FROM emp s LEFT JOIN c
  ON c.empno = s.empno;

3) using scalar sub-query:

SELECT s.*, (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM emp WHERE super=s.empno) AS "Num_subordinates"
FROM emp s;
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