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If I have an array of DateTime values:

List<DateTime> arrayDateTimes;

What's the way to find the average DateTime among them?

For instance, if I have:

2003-May-21 15:00:00
2003-May-21 19:00:00
2003-May-21 20:00:00

the average should be:

2003-May-21 18:00:00
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1  
+1 nice question. See this 42zone.blogspot.com/2011/09/…, just tested it and works with over 38,000 dates. –  Habib May 22 '13 at 4:56
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you have large list you can use below method

var count = dates.Count;
double temp = 0D;
for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
    temp += dates[i].Ticks / (double)count;
}
var average = new DateTime((long)temp);
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4  
It will throw overflow exception with large list. –  x2. May 22 '13 at 4:28
    
dates[i].Ticks / count will return 0 if count > Ticks –  Uzzy May 22 '13 at 8:19
    
Console.WriteLine(ticks / (ticks + 1)); Console.WriteLine(ticks / long.MaxValue); What would be printed ? –  Uzzy May 22 '13 at 8:26
    
@Uzzy: Ticks are measured as the number of 100-nanosecond intervals that elapsed since Jan 1, 1601. I don't know the word for such number but this is how it may look 635,047,830,427,420,548 so I don't think count will be greater than Ticks. –  c00000fd May 22 '13 at 8:32
    
@Damith: System.Int64 is an integer. –  c00000fd May 22 '13 at 8:33
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This shouldn't overflow, it does assume the datetimes are ordered though:

var first = dates.First().Ticks;
var average = new DateTime(first + (long) dates.Average(d => d.Ticks - first));

The above does in fact overflow with larger lists and larger gaps. I think you could use seconds for better range. (again, sorted first) Also, this might not be the most performant method, but still completed with 10M dates relatively quickly for me. Not sure if it's easier to read or not, YYMV.

var first = dates.First();
var average = first.AddSeconds(dates.Average(d => (d - first).TotalSeconds));
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I'm not sure I follow. Ticks is of type long. A future tick, minus a past tick, will give a relatively small number, and shouldn't ever have the possibility of overflowing. –  neouser99 May 22 '13 at 4:43
    
Hmm. Yeah, you might have a point. Let me check... –  c00000fd May 22 '13 at 4:45
    
I think it's pretty good option. Need to test to be sure :) –  x2. May 22 '13 at 4:45
    
@c00000fd no problem, glad to help with a solution. –  neouser99 May 22 '13 at 4:51
1  
Tested and this gives Arithmetic operation resulted in an overflow. –  Damith May 22 '13 at 5:19
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class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<DateTime> dates = new List<DateTime>(){
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 17, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 17, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 17, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 18, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 19, 0, 0),
        new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 20, 0, 0), new DateTime(2003, 5, 21, 16, 0, 0),
    };

        var averageDate = dates.Average();

        Console.WriteLine(averageDate);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

}

public static class Extensions
{
    public static long Average(this IEnumerable<long> longs)
    {
        long count = longs.Count();

        long mean = 0;

        foreach (var val in longs)
        {
            mean += val / count;
        }

        return mean;
    }

    public static DateTime Average(this IEnumerable<DateTime> dates)
    {
        return new DateTime(dates.Select(x => x.Ticks).Average());
    }
}
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I'm obviously not doing it with 3 values :) Your method will overflow with about 20 dates. –  c00000fd May 22 '13 at 4:37
    
@c00000fd: 40 datetimes and an extension method after, there's no more overflow. –  Leniel Macaferi May 22 '13 at 4:55
1  
Yeah, thanks. Although it's been already suggested by @Damith above. –  c00000fd May 22 '13 at 4:57
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Source: Taken from Here and modified a bit.

List<DateTime> dates = new List<DateTime>();
//Add dates
for (int i = 1; i <= 28; i++) //days
    for (int j = 1; j <= 12; j++) //month
        for (int k = 1900; k <= 2013; k++) //year
            dates.Add(new DateTime(k, j, i, 1, 2, 3)); //over 38000 dates

Then you can do:

var averageDateTime = DateTime
                            .MinValue
                            .AddSeconds
                            ((dates
                                 .Sum(r => (r - DateTime.MinValue).TotalSeconds))
                                     / dates.Count);
Console.WriteLine(averageDateTime.ToString("yyyy-MMM-dd HH:mm:ss"));

Output in: 1956-Dec-29 06:09:25

Originally the code from the article was like:

double totalSec = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < dates.Count; i++)
{
    TimeSpan ts = dates[i].Subtract(DateTime.MinValue);
    totalSec += ts.TotalSeconds;
}
double averageSec = totalSec / dates.Count;
DateTime averageDateTime = DateTime.MinValue.AddSeconds(averageSec);
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