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I want to add some OpenCL support to Chromium, so I used APIs like clCreateCommandQueue(), but I can't find a proper place in Chromium to do cleanup.

So, if I don't call APIs like clReleaseCommandQueue(), will OS reclaim the memory after the process terminates? Or need I call it at the exit point of the process?

PS, The commandqueue is needed during the whole life of the process, so I just want to make sure it will not cause memory leak after process termination.

Thank you for help.

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Is this not a job for atexit(3)? –  Yann Vernier May 22 '13 at 19:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since all the OpenCL objects are, ultimately, held by the device driver, you can't expect them to be automatically released once the application terminates. That is always your job.

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But if OpenCL objects are allocated in the memory block of the process, when the process exits, how can they still retain there? Because the device driver control them? –  jean May 25 '13 at 9:36
    
What makes you think that the entirety of each OpenCL object resides in the memory space allocated to your program? I don't see any guarantee in the OpenCL standard. In fact, pg 18 of the 1.2 spec talks about a reference count: "After the reference count reaches zero, the object’s resources are deallocated by OpenCL". I take that as an indication that the OpenCL implementation holds part of the objects memory and will only release it when the appropriate clRelease* call is made. –  chippies May 27 '13 at 1:46
    
I see, thank you very much. –  jean May 27 '13 at 2:51

If you use the OpenCL C++ wrapper (cl.hpp) then the compiler will figure out where to clean up your objects (when the referring object goes out of scope).

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I guess that clean-up work relies on the destructors of classes. But Chromium may prevent destructors from running at fast closing, I think. –  jean Jun 3 '13 at 1:22

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