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I found the following declaration code in the very early sources of C compiler

main(argc, argv)
int argv[]; { 
   return 0;
}

I tried to run it on ideone.com compiling it in "C" mode with gcc-4.7.2 and it compiles fine and even runs successfully

result: Success     time: 0s    memory: 1828 kB     returned value: 0

Now I'm aware that there was a pre-standard way of declaring function parameters this way:

int funct(crc, buf, len)
    int crc;
    register char* buf;
    int len;
{
   //function implementation
}

but in the latter style it's quite clear - the parameters are first just listed, then declared as if they were a kind of local variables and I see all the parameters declared and the return type.

Back to the first code

main(argc, argv)
int argv[]; { 
   return 0;
}

in the former code there're two parameters listed and only one declared and it looks like argv has type array of int.

How is it being treated by the compiler?

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2  
int was the default for types not declared. So argc is int. –  user93353 May 22 '13 at 7:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are talking about pre-ANSI C, and the style of prototype known as K&R prototypes. For such function declarations, parameters and return values whose types are not specified are deemed to be of type int.

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main(argc, argv)
int argv[]; { 
   return 0;
}
  1. The type of argc is int in K&R C and C90 due to the implicit integer conversion rule but it's not a conforming code in C99 & C11. Because the implicit int conversion has been deprecated in C99 and C11. Same goes for the return value of main().

  2. main() receives the arguments passed from the host. Since main() can't receive array of ints but only an array of strings. This could potentially cause undefined behaviour because the actual arguments passed to main() can't be accessed with using an integer array. Compiler can't do type checking for the parameters because main() is called from outside (from the hosted environment). So compiler assumes whatever you say as parameters for main() are correct. You can even do:

int main(argc, argv, a, b,c)
int argc;
int argv[];
int a, b, c;
{
....
}

This is a valid code. But there's no legal way to access all these ints (except argc).

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It is K&R C syntax where compiler won't check the types of arguments and arguments will be default to int.

K&R sysntax still gets suppot from the latest compilers for compatibility.In cases where code must be compilable by either standard-conforming or K&R C-based compilers, the STDC macro can be used to split the code into Standard and K&R sections to prevent the use on a K&R C-based compiler of features available only in Standard C.

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GCC comes with a non-standard setup as default. The code you posted will not compile on a conforming C compiler.

Compile with a C compiler instead. gcc -std=c99 -pedantic-errors will not compile your code.

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