Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is the actual file data:

abc
def
ghi
jkl
mno

And the required output should be in this format:

'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno'

The command what I used to do this gives output as:

abc,def,ghi,jkl,mno

The command is as follows:

sed -n 's/[0-3]//;s/ //;p' Split_22_05_2013 | \
  awk -v ORS= '{print $0" ";if(NR%4==0){print "\n"}}'
share|improve this question
    
Hi. And what is your question? Which specific problem do you have? –  phresnel May 24 '13 at 6:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In response to sudo_O's comment I add an awk less solution in pure bash. It does not exec any program at all. Of course instead of <<XXX ... XXX (here-is-the-document) stuff one could add <filename.

set c=""
while read w; do
  echo -e "$c'$w'\c"
  c=,
done<<XXX
abc
def
ghi
jkl
mno
XXX

Output:

'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno'

An even shorter version:

printf -v out ",'%s'" $(<infile)
echo ${out:1}

Without the horrifying pipe snakes You can try something like this:

awk 'NR>1{printf ","}{printf "\x27%s\x27",$0}' <<XXX
abc
def
ghi
jkl
mno
XXX

Output:

'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno'

Or an other version which reads the whole input as one line:

awk -vRS="" '{gsub("\n","\x27,\x27");print"\x27"$0"\x27"}'

Or a version which lets awk uses the internal variables more

awk -vRS="" -F"\n" -vOFS="','" -vORS="'" '{$1=$1;print ORS $0}'

The $1=$1; is needed to tell to awk to repack $0 using the new field and record separators (OFS, ORS).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for not needless spawning sub-processes. Note that not using a space after -v isn't portable. –  iiSeymour May 22 '13 at 8:54
    
@sudo_O: Thanks for the comment! I did not know about the space issue! On linux and HP-UX is works without it. –  TrueY May 22 '13 at 8:57
    
@sudo_O: At the end I eliminated awk as well. :) –  TrueY May 22 '13 at 9:03
    
I prefer the awk solution haha ;) –  iiSeymour May 22 '13 at 9:07
1  
@PavanDongray: The pleasure is mine! And the Oscar goes to ...? ;) –  TrueY May 22 '13 at 9:41
$ cat test.txt
abc
def
ghi
jkl
mno

$ cat test.txt | tr '\n' ','
abc,def,ghi,jkl,mno,

$ cat test.txt | awk '{print "\x27" $1 "\x27"}' | tr '\n' ','
'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno',

$ cat test.txt | awk '{print "\x27" $1 "\x27"}' | tr '\n' ',' | sed 's/,$//'
'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno'

The last command can be shortened to avoid UUOC:

$ awk '{print "\x27" $1 "\x27"}' test.txt | tr '\n' ',' | sed 's/,$//'
'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno'
share|improve this answer
1  
This seems to be missing the quotes, still. –  Jonathan Leffler May 22 '13 at 7:15
    
@miku i want the output as 'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno' –  122user321 May 22 '13 at 7:16
    
@PavanDongray: Edited: Added quotes. –  miku May 22 '13 at 7:17
1  
@miku - Some people don't like cat file | other_command . They prefer other_command file. +1 anyway. –  mouviciel May 22 '13 at 7:19
1  
Uh... The awk ... | tr ... | sed ... is fairly impressive, but a little bit pointless. Awk can handle this. –  TrueY May 22 '13 at 8:17

Using sed alone:

sed -n "/./{s/^\|\$/'/g;H}; \${x;s/\n//;s/\n/,/gp};" test.txt

Edit: Fixed, it should also work with or without empty lines now.

share|improve this answer
    
It depends on the last line actually - if last line of data ends with newline it will work. Otherwise you swap two blocks of code and make it s/^\|\$/'/g;H;\${x;s/\n//;s/\n/,/gp} instead. –  aragaer May 22 '13 at 9:27
    
@aragaer Your command worked fine...... thanks... –  122user321 May 22 '13 at 9:27
    
+1 now it works. –  Thor May 22 '13 at 9:31
$ cat file 
abc
def
ghi
jkl
mno

$ cat file | tr '\n' ' ' | awk -v q="'" -v OFS="','" '$1=$1 { print q $0 q }'
'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno'
  1. Replace '\n' with ' ' -> (tr '\n\ ' ')
  2. Replace each separator (' ' space) with (',' quote-comma-quote) -> (-v OFS="','")
  3. Add quotes to the begin and end of line -> (print q $0 q)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for ur reply...... –  122user321 May 22 '13 at 9:33

This can be done pretty briefly with sed and paste:

<infile sed "s/^\|\$/'/g" | paste -sd,

Or more portably (I think, cannot test right now):

sed "s/^\|\$/'/g" infile | paste -s -d , -
share|improve this answer
    
ur command worked fine after removing infile from cmd ie sed "s/^\|\$/'/g" <i/P file> | paste -s -d , - –  122user321 May 22 '13 at 9:48
    
@PavanDongray: I see, I have moved infile to be an argument to sed in the portable version. The <infile notation should work with most newer shells. –  Thor May 22 '13 at 10:31
$ sed "s/[^ ][^ ]*/'&',/g" input.txt | tr -d '\n'
'abc','def','ghi','jkl','mno',

To clean the last ,, throw in a

| sed 's/,$//'
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for ur reply....... –  122user321 May 22 '13 at 9:36
awk 'seen == 1 { printf("'"','"'%s", $1);} seen == 0 {seen = 1; printf("'"'"'%s", $1);} END { printf("'"'"'\n"); }'

In slightly more readable format (suitable for awk -f):

# Print quote-terminator, separator, quote-start, thing
seen == 1 { printf("','%s", $1); }
# Set the "print separator" flag, print quote-start thing
seen == 0 { seen = 1; printf("'%s", $1}; }
END { printf("'\n"); } # Print quote-end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for ur reply...... –  122user321 May 22 '13 at 9:33
 perl -l54pe 's/.*/\x27$&\x27/' file
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.