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I have a database with 9537 nodes and 52846 relationships. Both nodes and relationships have attributes which are indexed.

I am running many queries against this database which have more or less the following form:

START n0 = node:my_nodes(label='2'), n4 = node:my_nodes(label='2') 
MATCH n0-[r0]-n4
WITH n0, n4, r0            
MATCH n0-[r1]-n3                   
WHERE r1.lab - r0.lab = 0 and n3.label = 0 and id(r1) <> id(r0) 
WITH n0, n4, n3, r0, r1                   
MATCH n0-[r2]-n2  
WHERE r2.lab - r0.lab = 0 and n2.label = 2 and id(r2) <> id(r0) and id(r2) <> id(r1)
WITH n0, n4, n3, n2, r0, r1, r2                    
MATCH n0-[r3]-n1 
WHERE r3.lab - r0.lab = -1 and n1.label= 0 and id(r3) <> id(r0) and id(r3) <> id(r1) and id(r3) <> id(r2)      
RETURN id(n0), r0.lab, r1.lab, r2.lab, r3.lab;

Instead of specific values for attribute values (both for nodes and relationships) I have parameters which change. The structure of the MATCH also changes.

My problem right now is that if java does not hit memory limit, the query runs for more than 30 minutes.

Is there a way to optimize this kind of query? Do I have to tune up some configuration settings to improve the performance?

PS: I am using neo4j-1.9-RC2 on FreeBSD (linux distribution runs there). Memory configuration:

wrapper.java.initmemory=512
wrapper.java.maxmemory=8192 
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2 Answers 2

What is it zou actually want to achieve?

Can you describe your domain?

Upgrade to 1.9.GA

I would combine some of your MATCHES. Cypher pulls in where expressions into the pattern matcher, so make sure they are visible to the matcher that you want to limit with the expressions.

Try to use the profile command.

Also perhaps instead of passing r0 etc. perhaps just pass r0.lab as r0_lab, sane for id's.

It would be good to have the dataset available somewhere to do some profiling.

You can also execute the individual parts and return counts to see how many rows are returned (combinatorial explosion) then it makes sense to use WITH distinct .... to merge the intermediate results into fewer rows.

Perhaps try this for starters:

START n0 = node:my_nodes(label='2'), n4 = node:my_nodes(label='2') 
MATCH n0-[r0]-n4
WITH n0, r0.lab as r0_lab, id(r0) as id_r0
MATCH n0-[r1]-n3                   
WHERE r1.lab = r0_lab and n3.label = 0 and id(r1) <> r0_id
WITH n0, r0_lab, r1.lab as r1_lab, [r0_id,id(r1)] as rel_ids
MATCH n0-[r2]-n2  
WHERE r2.lab = r0_lab and n2.label = 2 and id(r2) NOT IN rel_ids
WITH n0, rel_ids + id(r2) as rel_ids,r1_lab,r1_lab,r2.lab as r2_lab
MATCH n0-[r3]-n1 
WHERE r3.lab = r0_lab - 1 and n1.label= 0 and id(r3) NOT IN rel_ids
RETURN id(n0), r0_lab, r1_lab, r2_lab, r3.lab;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for nice ideas. so far your suggestion especially with using distinct works the best. I am actually doing graph pattern mining, and I have a family of patterns for which I need to enumerate graph embeddings. So, this specific pattern is just one of the possible ones. But I noticed that it is the one which takes the most time to query. With path patterns Neo4j copes pretty well. –  npobedina May 24 '13 at 8:55
    
what do you mean by "Cypher pulls in where expressions into the pattern matcher, so make sure they are visible to the matcher that you want to limit with the expressions." ? how do I make sure that Cypher 'sees' where-expressions? –  npobedina May 24 '13 at 9:09

Remove the WITH clauses and combine your MATCHes and WHEREs together.

START n0 = node:my_nodes(label='2'), n4 = node:my_nodes(label='2')
MATCH n0-[r0]-n4
    , n0-[r1]-n3
    , n0-[r2]-n2
    , n0-[r3]-n1
WHERE r1.lab - r0.lab = 0 and n3.label = 0 and id(r1) <> id(r0)
  AND r2.lab - r0.lab = 0 and n2.label = 2 and id(r2) <> id(r0) and id(r2) <> id(r1)
  AND r3.lab - r0.lab = -1 and n1.label= 0 and id(r3) <> id(r0) and id(r3) <> id(r1) and id(r3) <> id(r2)
RETURN id(n0), r0.lab, r1.lab, r2.lab, r3.lab;

The problem with using WITH is that it forces Neo4j to enumerate all possible results before continuing on to future conditions. For example, in your query above neo4j would find ALL possible paths including n0-[r0]-n4, enumerate every single one of them, then pass the results to the next step. The next step would find all matching candidates, enumerate all of them, and pass them on, etc etc.

By combining these clauses together without separating them by WITH, neo4j can evaluate the results as it goes and short circuit sooner.

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1  
I thought this was how WITH worked, but I'm pretty sure it actually is lazy, meaning it's more like a pipeline that sends results all the way through to the end, until the final return is iterated through (unless you need to sort, or do something else that makes that impossible). The short-circuit part of your argument is still valid, though. –  Wes Freeman May 22 '13 at 21:11
    
WITH is lazy it doesn't pre-compute things except when you use order by, distinct or aggregation –  Michael Hunger May 23 '13 at 2:52
    
previously I was writing cypher queries the way @ean5533 suggests, but I figured out that the queries with WITH perform faster. I will try out now different combinations. Does it matter how many nodes I put into the START? Is it better to put only n0 into the START and the rest to filter out in WHERE? –  npobedina May 23 '13 at 6:36

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