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I have to generate big fat large images, something like 15000x3000. I generate this images with GDI+, class Bitmap.

Of course, from time to time, the generation will failed because there is no more memory to instantiate the Bitmap. My goal is to inform my user about the maximum size of the image they are allowed to generate.

The message should look like:

You tried to generate an image of size 15000x3000, but there is not enough memory. The maximum size available is 10000x3000, or 15000x1000.

The idea to create the message is something like that:

public bool CanCreateBitmap(Size size, out string message)
{
    long availableMemory = this.GetAvailableContiguousMemory();
    long bytesRequiered = (long)size.Width * size.Height * 32;

    if (availableMemory < bytesRequiered)
    {
        var sizeProposal1 = new Size(size.Width, (int)(availableMemory / (32 * size.Width)));
        var sizeProposal2 = new Size((int)(availableMemory / (32 * size.Height)), size.Height);

        message = string.Format("You tried to generate an image of size {0}, but there is not enough memory."
                + Environment.NewLine + "The maximum size available is {1}, or {2}."
                , size, sizeProposal1, sizeProposal2);

        return false;
    }
    else
    {
        message = "";
        return true;
    }
}

But I don't have the code for the function GetAvailableContiguousMemory().

Is there a method to retrieve the contigous memory in .Net?
Am I asking the right question for achieve my goal?

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Maybe you could put the bitmap creation code in a try/catch block and handle the out of memory exception if it happens? –  dandan78 May 22 '13 at 8:10
    
That's already the idea, but the main point here is too propose something to the user. They get bored to get only a "can't create the bitmap" message with no more information. –  Cyril Gandon May 22 '13 at 8:15
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2 Answers

These kind of notification are a band-aid that doesn't actually help the user. They really wanted to create that large bitmap and an arbitrarily smaller one isn't what they wanted. If you want to do this anyway then you'll need to pinvoke VirtualQuery to walk the virtual address space and find chunks that are not yet mapped.

There is no point in having this problem anymore these days, change your project's Platform Target setting to AnyCPU so your program can use the gobs of virtual memory space available on a 64-bit operating system.

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There is no such function because question "How much memory could I allocate" contains a race condition. Suppose that there exists a function you need and you call it and it tells you that there is a huge amount of memory available. You communicate that to the user, user decides on image size and then you get onto actually allocating the image. But some other process has taken half of the available memory in the meanwhile and now your call breaks with OutOfMemoryException.

There is a similar problem in media streaming over TCP/IP. You would like to start streaming a video, but it requires quite a lot of network bandwidth and you want to be sure that this bandwidth will be available couple of minutes later as well, because it would be counterproductive to start the video stream just to be stuck when playback reaches two thirds of the video length. Now, this problem was solved by reserving network resources during the handshake phase - even if you're not using the bandwidth right now (video streaming has not started yet).

Well, you might try to achieve similar effect with some obscure Windows API calls. Try starting the research from VirtualAlloc function. However, I would not recommend you to walk that path because your application, even if you make it work well, might be unstable or unreliable or affect other processes on the system. Especially, these Windows APIs are natively used from C++ and you're working with managed heap in .NET - I haven't tried such approach and can't predict the outcome (but would like to hear from you with results if you succeed!).

What you are asking about is then a design decision. I would also recommend dandan78's approach - let the user select image size, try to create it and communicate the error back if the attempt failed. Users will eventually get accustomed to their computer's abilities and won't push the system beyond its limits much often.

EDIT: One more thing you should keep in mind: There is no such thing as "available contiguous memory". Operating system lends you pages of virtual memory. These pages are then loaded into memory when referenced. If you ask for a lot of memory, you'll get a bunch of pages that will be assigned consecutive addresses in virtual memory space and that's how you'll get the impression that memory is contiguous. But you usually have non-contiguous memory locations returned by the new statement because memory manager simply returns the first available slot on the managed heap. I know these notes are off topic for this question, but it certainly won't hurt to keep memory management strategies on mind in situations like this one.

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That's true that the creation could failed even if the function return true. But I already add a try catch for create the instance. The function is here just to add an advice for the user. –  Cyril Gandon May 22 '13 at 9:28
    
I understand what you need. One more thing you should keep in mind: There is no such thing as "available contiguous memory". Operating system lends you pages of virtual memory. These pages are then loaded into memory when referenced. If you ask for a lot of memory, you'll get a bunch of pages that will be assigned consecutive addresses in virtual memory space and that's how you'll get the impression that memory is contiguous. The only way to have non-contiguous memory is to be given chunks of memory from previously allocated pages, which hits you when you allocate a lot of small objects. –  sysexpand May 22 '13 at 9:37
    
@sysexpand: your comment about how allocation works would be a good addition to your answer. –  Igby Largeman May 22 '13 at 10:20
    
@IgbyLargeman Added to the answer now. Thank you for suggestion. –  sysexpand May 22 '13 at 11:14
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