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I am new at the domain of machine learning and i have noticed that there are a lot of algorithms/ set of algorithms that can be used: SVM, decision trees, naive bayes, perceptron etc... That is why I wonder which algorithm should one use for solving which issue? In other words which algorithm solves which problem class?

So my question is if you know a good web site or book that focuses on this algorithm selection problematic?

Any help would be appreciated. Thx in advance.

Horace

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No free lunch - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_free_lunch_theorem –  Roger Rowland May 22 '13 at 9:15
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A while ago I read an article which contained a "cheat sheet". The article, which focuses on the usage of the python module scikits-learn can be found here. –  pwagner May 22 '13 at 13:22
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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Take Andrew Ng's machine learning course on coursera. It's beautifully put together, explains the differences between different types of ML algorithm, gives advice on when to use each algorithm, and contains material useful for practioners as well as maths if you want it. I'm in the process of learning machine learning myself and this has been by far the most useful resource.

(Another piece of advice you might find useful is to consider learning python. This is based on a mistake I made of not starting to learn python at an earlier stage and ruling out the many books, web pages, sdks, etc that are python based. As it turns out, python is pretty easy to pick up, and from my own personal observations at least, widely used in the machine learning and data science communities.)

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+1 for mentioning Andrew Ng's cousera offering - I did this last year and it really is an accessible introduction for beginners. –  Roger Rowland May 22 '13 at 12:29
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It is very hard answer the question “which algorithm for which issue?”

That ability comes with a lot of experience and knowledge. So I suggest, you should read few good books about machine learning. Probably, following book would be a good starting point.

Machine Learning: A Probabilistic Perspective

Once you have some knowledge about machine learning, you can work on couple of simple machine learning problems. Iris flower dataset is a good starting point. It consists of several features belonging to three types of Iris species. Initially develop a simple machine learning model (such as Logistic Regression) to classify Iris species and gradually you could move to more advanced models such as Neural Networks.

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Another book could be "Machine Learning in Action" in which the author (Peter Harrington) describes several machine learning algorithms, including their applicability. –  Emile May 22 '13 at 9:31
    
MLAPP is probably the best general ML theory book around at the moment, it is not as intimidating as some of the other books, so long as you have some callege math. This book available free on-line is excellent too www-stat.stanford.edu/~tibs/ElemStatLearn (but not as approachable as Murphy's book). In you want something more practical go for Machine Learning in Action. –  B... May 24 '13 at 5:04
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@TooTone: In my opinion Machine Learning in Action could help the OP with deciding on which technique to use for a particular problem, as the book gives a clear classification of the different ML algorithms and pros, cons, and "works with" for each of them. I do agree the code is somewhat hard to read, especially for people not used to matrix operations. There is years of research condensed into a 10 line Python program, so be prepared that understanding it will take a day (for me at least).

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I read "Machine Learning for Hackers" which uses R, because I knew some R, but in hindsight I wished I'd read "Machine Learning in Action", which uses python instead, as python seems more mainstream and Peter Harrington's book has more favorable reviews in general. Nevertheless there do seem to be problems with both books in terms of editing, readability of code etc. There seem to be several very strong theoretical books on ML, like the one Upul recommends, but no really stand-out pragmatic ones. –  TooTone May 22 '13 at 22:12
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As a simple starting place I consider what inputs I have and what outputs I want, which often narrows down choices in any situation. For example, if I have categories, rather than numbers and a target category for each input, decision trees are a good idea. If I have no target, I can only do clustering. If I have numerical inputs and a numerical output I could use neural networks or other types of regression. I could also use decision trees that generate regression equations. There are further questions to be asked after this, but it's a good place to start.

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Following DZone Refcard might also helpful .. http://refcardz.dzone.com/refcardz/machine-learning-predictive. But you will have to dig in to each in detail eventually.

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