Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm still rather new to R and may have gotten the concept of data frames completely messed up.

But I have a csv file in the following format:

ID;Year;Title;Authors;Keywords;

Where Authors and Keywords are supposed to be a list of strings. E.g.

1;2013;Towards Dynamic Non-obtrusive Health Monitoring Based on SOA and Cloud;Mohammed Serhani, Abdelghani Benharret, Erlabi Badidi;E-health, Diseases, Monitoring, Prevention, SOA, Cloud, Platform, m-tech;

Is there a way to read this csv file into R so that the data frame columns for Authors and Keywords are built as lists of lists? And does this require me to format the csv file in a specific way?

Reading the csv with the following options

articles <- read.csv(file="ls.csv",head=TRUE,sep=";",stringsAsFactors=F)

Yields the Authors colum as a list containing character instances. But what I'm trying to achieve is getting a list of characters in each field in the Authors column.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Are you saying that your file contains five variables (ID, year, title, authors, keywords) that are separated by semicolons? Then, by definition, it's not a csv file! Remember that csv stands for comma-separated values. Somebody screwed up by naming it as such.

You can read arbitrarily-delimited data using read.table:

articles <- read.table("ls.csv", header=TRUE, sep=";", stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
share|improve this answer
1  
In many countries the comma is used as a decimal separator and, therefore, the semicolon is used in csv files (yes, they are still called csv files) as column seperator. read.table works, but there is also a read.csv2 for these files. –  Jan van der Laan May 22 '13 at 9:53
add comment

Like Hong Ooi pointed out, your fields are separated by ';', not ','. Function read.csv has default value sep="," while read.csv2 has default sep=";". If I understood correctly, your fields Authors and Keywords are separated by ',' and you wish to separate these as well.

I do not think you could have a list type of items in columns Authors and Keywords in a data.frame, as the column of a data.frame cannot be a list. If a list is given to a data.frame, it is broken down to its column components. In your case it will not work as there will be a varying number of authors and/or keywords:

# Works
data.frame(a=list(first=1:3, second=letters[1:3]), b=list(first=4:6, second=LETTERS[1:3]))
#  a.first a.second b.first b.second
#1       1        a       4        A
#2       2        b       5        B
#3       3        c       6        C

# Does not work
data.frame(a=list(first=1:3, second=letters[1:2]), b=list(first=4:6, second=LETTERS[1:6]))
#Error in data.frame(first = 1:3, second = c("a", "b"), check.names = FALSE,  : 
#  arguments imply differing number of rows: 3, 2

But since a list may contain lists, you could try break the data frame down to such. Contents of 'example.txt':

ID;Year;Title;Authors;Keywords;
1;2013;Towards Dynamic Non-obtrusive Health Monitoring Based on SOA and Cloud;Mohammed Serhani, Abdelghani Benharret, Erlabi Badidi;E-health, Diseases, Monitoring, Prevention, SOA, Cloud, Platform, m-tech;
2;1234;Title2;Author1, Author2;Key1, Key2, Key3;
3;5678;Title3;Author3, Author4, Author5;Key1, Key2, Key4;

Here is an example of how to do it:

x <- scan("example.txt", what="", sep="\n", strip.white=TRUE)
y <- strsplit(x, ";")
# Leave out the header
dat <- y[-1]

# Apply a function to every element inside the highest level list
dat <- lapply(dat, 
    FUN=function(x) {
        # Splits in authors and keywords list
        ret <- strsplit(x, ",");
        # Remove leading and trailing whitespace
        ret <- lapply(ret, FUN=function(z) gsub("(^ +)|( +$)", "", z));
        # Assign names to all the fields
        names(ret)<-unlist(y[1]); 
        ret
    }
)

Output:

> str(dat)
List of 3
 $ :List of 5
  ..$ ID      : chr "1"
  ..$ Year    : chr "2013"
  ..$ Title   : chr "Towards Dynamic Non-obtrusive Health Monitoring Based on SOA and Cloud"
  ..$ Authors : chr [1:3] "Mohammed Serhani" "Abdelghani Benharret" "Erlabi Badidi"
  ..$ Keywords: chr [1:8] "E-health" "Diseases" "Monitoring" "Prevention" ...
 $ :List of 5
  ..$ ID      : chr "2"
  ..$ Year    : chr "1234"
  ..$ Title   : chr "Title2"
  ..$ Authors : chr [1:2] "Author1" "Author2"
  ..$ Keywords: chr [1:3] "Key1" "Key2" "Key3"
 $ :List of 5
  ..$ ID      : chr "3"
  ..$ Year    : chr "5678"
  ..$ Title   : chr "Title3"
  ..$ Authors : chr [1:3] "Author3" "Author4" "Author5"
  ..$ Keywords: chr [1:3] "Key1" "Key2" "Key4"

# Keywords of first item
> dat[[1]]$Keywords
[1] "E-health"   "Diseases"   "Monitoring" "Prevention" "SOA"       
[6] "Cloud"      "Platform"   "m-tech"  

# Title of second item
> dat[[2]][[3]]
[1] "Title2"

# Traveling inside the list of lists, accessing the very last data element
> lastitem <- length(dat)
> lastfield <- length(dat[[lastitem]])
> lastkey <- length(dat[[lastitem]][[lastfield]])
> dat[[lastitem]][[lastfield]][[lastkey]]
[1] "Key4"

Notice that lists of lists may be an inefficient way to store data in R, so if you have lots of data you may want to move to a more efficient method, e.g. relational database structure where the access key is your ID, assuming it is unique.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.