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We're experiencing difficulties in managing different customer databases:

We need to alter a primary key column from VARCHAR(20) to VARCHAR(40) without altering the collation. The reason behind this is that we use a case-insensitive default collation and the column we want to change is case-sensitive and needs to stay that way.

Usually this would be no problem, we could tell it to keep the case-sensitive collation:

ALTER TABLE Commiss 
   ALTER COLUMN CommissName VARCHAR(40)
      COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS NOT NULL;

However, some of our customers have different default collations (French, Chinese, ...). Until now, we could always use the same update-scripts for all customers. Now we need to change all ALTER COLUMN statements to the correct collation before updating the schema.

So my question is: Is there any way to tell SQL Server to alter the datatype and keep the existing collation for this column. Alternatively it would also be ok for us to do something like this:

ALTER TABLE Commiss 
   ALTER COLUMN CommissName VARCHAR(40)
      COLLATE CS_AS NOT NULL;

So effectively keeping the language as it is and only "changing" the case-sensitivity.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, not in the ALTER TABLE directly

You can generate these statements though from sys.columns:

DECLARE @sql nvarchar(1000);

SELECT
    @sql = 'ALTER TABLE ' + QUOTENAME(OBJECT_SCHEMA_NAME(c.object_id) + '.' + OBJECT_NAME(c.object_id)) +
   ' ALTER COLUMN ' + QUOTENAME(C.name) + ' VARCHAR(40)
      COLLATE ' + c.collation_name + ' NOT NULL;'
FROM
    sys.columns C
WHERE
    c.object_id = OBJECT_ID('dataenum.host')
    AND
    C.name = 'hostname';

SELECT @sql;

--EXEC (@sql);
share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping that there would be an easier way. I'm afraid this is too verbose for a simple statement like this. We will probably use a different approach and allow the collation for CI and CS to be specified at the top of the script once and set it to the right collation for the customer prior to running the script. Thanks anyway, I will mark this as the answer if nothing happens in the next hour. –  Excelcius May 22 '13 at 10:30
    
@Excelcius: OK. You'll have to edit the ALTER statements manually per client/collation. There is no magic trick to do what you want –  gbn May 22 '13 at 10:33
    
@Excelcius: After your comment update, this won't help you. You still need dynamic SQL for your ALTER statements because you can't parametrise it. –  gbn May 22 '13 at 10:34
    
Yeah sorry I accidentally hit Enter. We are already using SQLCMD in some places so this should work fine. It's just one of those manual steps that could fail if someone forgets to change it. But maybe we can utilize your script to determine the collation automatically and use it where appropriate using SQLCMD-variables. –  Excelcius May 22 '13 at 10:40
    
Hmm I'm not sure about SQLCMD variables and when they substitute in. If they sub in before the SQL parser looks at the statement then you are OK. Otherwise, you're back to the dynamic SQL problem. I would have thought that my script would be OK thought. It's self contained and independent of SQLCMD variables/parameters –  gbn May 22 '13 at 10:44

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