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I encounter a strange situation that is currently not that clear to me:

When having the potential null pointer access warning enabled in Eclipse, I get warnings like in the following (the warnings are stick to the line preceding the corresponding comment):

protected Item findItemByName(String itemName, Items items) {
    boolean isItemNameMissing = null == itemName || itemName.isEmpty();
    boolean isItemsMissing = null == items || null == items.getItems() || items.getItems().isEmpty();

    if (isItemNameMissing || isItemsMissing) {
        return null;
    }
    // potential null pointer access: the variable items might be null at this location
    for (Item item : items.getItems()) {
        // potential null pointer access: the variable itemName might be null at this location
        if (itemName.equals(item.getName())) {
            return item;
        }
    }

    return null;
}

The same happens to me if I check for null using Guava's Preconditions like

Preconditions.checkArgument(argument != null, "argument must not be null");

Where I can understand that in the latter case a flow analysis for checking when the IllegalArgumentException will happen might be too difficult/expensive or even impossible I in turn do not understand why the compiler raises the warning at all (if I remove the checks they disappear).

Can one maybe explain how the potential null pointer access is accomplished and why it is raised in both of the cases? Or at least point me to the direction.

In the meanwhile I have a look and see whether I find it out myself...

Addendum

I've kind of broken it down to the bare core of the case. Given the following class, the warning only shows up in the method sample2 (as pointed out by the comment again). Please note that the method sample3 does not trigger the warning either.

public class PotentialNullPointerAccess {

    public void sample1(final String aString) {

        if (aString == null) {
            return;
        }

        System.out.println(aString.length());
    }

    public void sample2(final String aString) {

        boolean stringIsNull = null == aString;

        if (stringIsNull) {
            return;
        }

        // Potential null pointer access: The variable aString might be null at this location
        System.out.println(aString.length());

    }


    public void sample3(final String aString) {

        System.out.println(aString.length());
    }
}
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The first 2 lines of the code seems not reader friendly, IMO you should use braces to group the expressions –  sanbhat May 22 '13 at 9:12
2  
What is the exact warning you're getting? And why do you think it's coming from the compiler, as opposed to from Eclipse? –  T.J. Crowder May 22 '13 at 9:15
1  
@T.J.Crowder: I somehow subsumed compiler to include the Eclipse Java Compiler (ejc) as well. Further, the exact error message I am getting is stated in the comment, as I wrote (except for the first character being a capital letter). –  Andreas May 22 '13 at 9:25
    
@sanbhat: Yes yes. Fwiw, it is code I discovered. If it comes to design flaws/code smell and such things, there would be a couple of things that are worth being mentioned within this tiny method... –  Andreas May 22 '13 at 9:28
    
You should take this to an Eclipse forum, maybe even file a bug straight away. –  Marko Topolnik May 22 '13 at 9:32

3 Answers 3

I think it is somehow answered by Ed Merks within this forum post:

http://www.eclipse.org/forums/index.php/t/278687/

From what I understand, Eclipse raises the warning once you assume a variable to potentially be null in the preceding code. You can do so by just check against null (either equal or not equal) - but you do have to have it separated somewhere as a variable, not simply as an if's solely expression.

share|improve this answer

This is probably not the cause of the warning but here you can have a null pointer.

for (Item item : items.getItems())
{
    // potential null pointer access: the variable itemName might be null at this location
    if (itemName.equals(item.getName()))
    {
        return item;
    }
}

You iterate over objects, but the object returned can be null. So item.getName() can cause a null pointer exception.

Exmaple

 List<String> l = new ArrayList<String>();
 l.add("test");
 l.add(null);
 l.add("another string");

 if(l == null)   // <-- this is similar to the above check
    return;

 for(String s : l)
 {
     s.charAt(0);   //  <-- null pointer access on second item.
 }
share|improve this answer
    
You could just replace item.getName() by any constant and thus obvious non-null string, but the warning will stay. –  Andreas May 22 '13 at 9:22
    
That's why I said that this is not the cause of the warning, but can still cause a null pointer. –  Devolus May 22 '13 at 9:42
    
Ah, now I get your point. But fwiw, will the foreach loop really ever yield a null? –  Andreas May 22 '13 at 10:24
    
That depends on what you pass in the iterator. I updated my posting with an exmaple to illustrate what I mean. Of course Eclipse doesn't show a null pointer warning on this, so you have to take care of it for yourself. –  Devolus May 22 '13 at 10:26

I don't think Eclipse (or perhaps even the compiler) can actually use branching + return information to determine if a variable is null or not.

All it can do is use the general information, that is items has no assignment in that method and thus it may be null, hence why Eclipse calls it potential null pointer access.

The same holds for itemName.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not clearly point out: When I remove the checks (anything above the first warning), the warnings are gone. –  Andreas May 22 '13 at 9:20
    
That is indeed strange. It might have to do with that you are using the said variables in some way, even though it is just checking them and not modifying them. –  skiwi May 22 '13 at 9:23
    
Addendum: even having the parameters final will not make a difference. –  Andreas May 22 '13 at 9:30
    
That is because you can still pass null to a method even if it is to be accepted as a final parameter. The only thing final guarantees (should guarantee) is that the parameter will not be changed. –  skiwi May 22 '13 at 9:48

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