Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In my application, I have a type responsible for computations that (may) involve large numbers and a type that is used for communication between processors.

typedef MyBigIntegerClass bigInt;
typedef int smallInt;

The communication part ist not compatible with MyBigIntegerClass, so before communicating e.g. a vector of bigInts it has to be converted to smallints. So far, no problem at all.

However, for most problem instances, the use of MyBigIntegerClass isn't necessary. In fact, even int32_t is sufficient. This is why I allow a configuration such as

typedef int32_t bigInt;
typedef int16_t smallInt;

The bigInt type still is sufficiently large for the computation stuff. The problem with this is, that smallInt has to differ from bigInt.

class Problematic
{
    public:
       Problematic(bigInt);
       Problematic(smallInt);
};

In this class, constructors or methods may either take bigInts or smallInts. If they are the same, compilation fails.

Since other users of the code might want to adjust the used types, they may end up with a configuration such as

typedef int32_t bigInt;
typedef int32_t smallInt;

and compilation fails in a (for at least some developers) non-obvious way.

One way of dealing with this would be static_assert(sizeof(bigInt) != sizeof(smallint), "bad config.."), but I actually like the possibility of having bigInt == smallInt. What would be a good way to change the declaration of class Problematic to allow equivalence of the types?

share|improve this question

If it is desirable to retain both the constructors a possible solution is wrap the int types in templates which means they are different types always, even if the underlying int type is the same:

template <typename T>
struct big_int
{
    T value;
};

template <typename T>
struct small_int
{
    T value;
};

typedef big_int<long> bigInt;
typedef small_int<long> smallInt;

class Problematic
{
public:
    Problematic(bigInt) {}
    Problematic(smallInt) {}
};

Compiles when underlying types are the same (http://ideone.com/KGz9Vk) and when they are not the same (http://ideone.com/Pt0XGS).

To allow big_int<> and small_int<> to behave as integral types implementations of the operators are required. For example:

template <typename T>
struct big_int
{
    T value;
    operator T() { return value; }

    big_int& operator+=(big_int const& other)
    {
        value += other.value;
        return *this;
    }

    template <typename U>
    big_int& operator+=(U const& v)
    {
        value += v;
        return *this;
    }

    big_int& operator++()
    {
        ++value;
        return *this;
    }

    big_int operator++(int)
    {
        big_int temp = *this;
        ++value;
        return temp;
    }
};

This is not exhaustive (see http://herbsutter.com/2013/05/20/gotw-4-class-mechanics/ for useful guidance on implementing operators). See http://ideone.com/xlE2Mi for example.

share|improve this answer
    
This is certainly a nice way, to have a distinction between the types. However it seems to break the usual interface (such as comparison with integers). Any idea on how to avoid this without reimplementing the whole interface in template struct small_int? – stefan May 22 '13 at 10:49
    
@stefan, for comparision with integers add a conversion operator to the templates: operator T() { return value; }. – hmjd May 22 '13 at 11:04
    
yeah but this isn't really a beautiful since I also need streaming, assignment.. – stefan May 22 '13 at 11:12
    
@stefan, you need to implement the required operators then. Will update with example shortly. – hmjd May 22 '13 at 11:16
    
@stefan, answer updated. – hmjd May 22 '13 at 11:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.