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Preferred languages: C/C++, Java, and Ruby.

I am looking for some helpful books/tutorials on how to write your own compiler simply for educational purposes. I am most familiar with C/C++, Java, and Ruby, so I prefer resources that involve one of those three, but any good resource is acceptable.

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40 Answers

As an starting point, it will be good to create a recursive descent parser (RDP) (let's say you want to create your own flavour of BASIC and build a BASIC interpreter) to understand how to write a compiler. I found the best information in Herbert Schild's C Power Users, chapter 7. This chapter refers to another book of H. Schildt "C The complete Reference" where he explains how to create a calculator (a simple expression parser). I found both books on eBay very cheap. You can check the code for the book if you go to www.osborne.com or check in www.HerbSchildt.com I found the same code but for C# in his latest book

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The Dragon Book is too complicated. So ignore it as a starting point. It is good and makes you think a lot once you already have a starting point, but for starters, perhaps you should simply try to write an math/logical expression evaluator using RD, LL or LR parsing techniques with everything (lexing/parsing) written by hand in perhaps C/Java. This is interesting in itself and gives you an idea of the problems involved in a compiler. Then you can jump in to your own DSL using some scripting language (since processing text is usually easier in these) and like someone said, generate code in either the scripting language itself or C. You should probably use flex/bison/antlr etc to do the lexing/parsing if you are going to do it in c/java.

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I'm surprised it hasn't been mentioned, but Donald Knuth's The Art of Computer Programming was originally penned as a sort of tutorial on compiler writing.

Of course, Dr. Knuth's propensity for going in-depth on topics has led to the compiler-writing tutorial being expanded to an estimated 9 volumes, only three of which have actually been published. It's a rather complete exposition on programming topics, and covers everything you would ever need to know about writing a compiler, in minute detail.

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Whenever I want to try out a new language idea, I just write a simple parser, and have it generate some language that's easy to get good compilers for, like C.

How do you think C++ was done?

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The quickest approach is through two books:

1990 version of An Introduction to Compiling Techniques, a First Course using ANSI C, LeX, and YaCC by JP Bennett - a perfect balance of example code, parsing theory and design- it contains a complete compiler written in C, lex and yacc for a simple grammar

Dragon Book (older version) - mostly a detailed reference for the features not covered in the former book

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If you are like me, who has no formal computer science education, and is interested in building/want to know how a compiler works:

I am recommend "Programming Language Processors in Java: Compilers and Interpreters", an amazing book for a self-taught computer programmer.

From my point of view, understanding those basic language theory, automate machine, and set theory is not a big problem. The problem is how to turn those things into code. The above book tells you how to write a parser, analysis context, and generate code. If you can not understand this book, then I have to say, give up building a compiler. The book is best programming book I have ever read.

There is an other book, also good, Compiler Design in C. There is a lot of code, and it tells you everything about how to build a compiler and lexer tools.

Building a compiler is a fun programming practice and can teach you heaps of programming skills.

Do not buy the Dragon book. It was a waste of money and time and is not for a practitioner.

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  • Start by making sure you can answer most of the questions tagged C++ here on Stack Overflow.
  • After that, you should make sure you understand how other compilers work and understand [parts of] their source code.
  • You'll notice you need assembler and will start learning assembler until you can answer many questions with that tag.
  • If you've come this far, you'll find that several years have passed and realize how big such a project is and possibly smile at your own question from back then (if this page still exists at that time) ...
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Not to be rude but, it sounds like you probably haven't written a simple compiler. –  mrduclaw Jul 20 '09 at 23:07
4  
Yes, I am currently working on my second simple language, in fact. I know assembler basics, I have used lex, yacc & bison, I know C++, I know a bit about the compilation of C++ and I messed with the inner workings of the PHP interpreter. I would say I have at least an understanding of how complex compilers/interpreters are. –  soulmerge Jul 21 '09 at 7:23
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Not included in the list so far is this book:

Basics of Compiler Design (Torben Mogensen) (from the dept. of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen)

I'm also interested in learning about compilers and plan to enter that industry in the next couple of years. This book is the ideal theory book to begin learning compilers as far as I can see. It's FREE to copy and reproduce, cleanly and carefully written and gives it to you in plain English without any code but still presents the mechanics by way of instructions and diagrams etc. Worth a look imo.

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If you're not just looking for books, but also interested in web sites that have articles on the topic, I've blogged about various aspects of creating a programming language. Most of the posts can be found in my blog's "Language Design" category: http://orangejuiceliberationfront.com/category/language-design/

In particular, I cover generating Intel machine code manually, automatically generating machine- or bytecode, creating a bytecode interpreter, writing an object-oriented runtime, creating a simple loader, and writing a simple mark/sweep garbage collector. All of this in a very practical and pragmatic way instead of boring you with lots of theory.

Would appreciate feedback on these.

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You can use BCEL by the Apache Software Foundation. With this tool you can generate assembler-like code, but it's Java with the BCEL API. You can learn how you can generate intermediate language code (in this case byte code).

Simple example

  1. Create a Java class with this function:

    public String maxAsString(int a, int b) {
        if (a > b) {
            return Integer.valueOf(a).toString();
        } else if (a < b) {
            return Integer.valueOf(b).toString();
        } else {
            return "equals";
        }
    }
    

Now run BCELifier with this class

BCELifier bcelifier = new BCELifier("MyClass", System.out);
bcelifier.start();

You can see the result on the console for the whole class (how to build byte code MyClass.java). The code for the function is this:

private void createMethod_1() {
  InstructionList il = new InstructionList();
  MethodGen method = new MethodGen(ACC_PUBLIC, Type.STRING, new Type[] { Type.INT, Type.INT }, new String[] { "arg0", "arg1" }, "maxAsString", "MyClass", il, _cp);

  il.append(InstructionFactory.createLoad(Type.INT, 1)); // Load first parameter to address 1
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createLoad(Type.INT, 2)); // Load second parameter to adress 2
    BranchInstruction if_icmple_2 = InstructionFactory.createBranchInstruction(Constants.IF_ICMPLE, null); // Do if condition (compare a > b)
  il.append(if_icmple_2);
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createLoad(Type.INT, 1)); // Load value from address 1 into the stack
  il.append(_factory.createInvoke("java.lang.Integer", "valueOf", new ObjectType("java.lang.Integer"), new Type[] { Type.INT }, Constants.INVOKESTATIC));
  il.append(_factory.createInvoke("java.lang.Integer", "toString", Type.STRING, Type.NO_ARGS, Constants.INVOKEVIRTUAL));
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createReturn(Type.OBJECT));
  InstructionHandle ih_13 = il.append(InstructionFactory.createLoad(Type.INT, 1));
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createLoad(Type.INT, 2));
    BranchInstruction if_icmpge_15 = InstructionFactory.createBranchInstruction(Constants.IF_ICMPGE, null); // Do if condition (compare a < b)
  il.append(if_icmpge_15);
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createLoad(Type.INT, 2));
  il.append(_factory.createInvoke("java.lang.Integer", "valueOf", new ObjectType("java.lang.Integer"), new Type[] { Type.INT }, Constants.INVOKESTATIC));
  il.append(_factory.createInvoke("java.lang.Integer", "toString", Type.STRING, Type.NO_ARGS, Constants.INVOKEVIRTUAL));
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createReturn(Type.OBJECT));
  InstructionHandle ih_26 = il.append(new PUSH(_cp, "equals")); // Return "equals" string
  il.append(InstructionFactory.createReturn(Type.OBJECT));
  if_icmple_2.setTarget(ih_13);
  if_icmpge_15.setTarget(ih_26);
  method.setMaxStack();
  method.setMaxLocals();
  _cg.addMethod(method.getMethod());
  il.dispose();
}
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