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How does Twisted know that a function should be executed in an asynchronous way?

Asynchronous functions should return a Deferred(immeadiately) with call-/errbacks attached that will be called when "asynchronous" data has been received. Received data is passed as the first arg to the callbacks. So far so good. But according to the Docs:

"Deferreds are not a non-blocking talisman: they are a signal for asynchronous functions to use to pass results onto callbacks ...".

If I perform a time consuming operation before returning the Deferred the function is blocking!? Is asynchronous execution bind to socket/io operations? Can someone explain this for a Twisted noob?

Thanks

[Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I try to get started with Twisted and I like to understand what is going on under the hood. And I tried to understand the docs already before posting questions here.]

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2 Answers 2

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Functions are not asynchronous within Twisted, unless you execute them in a thread with reactor.callInThread. Only I/O operations, via the reactor, are asynchronous. (You can think of a call to a thread as I/O though; and deferToThread will return a Deferred that completes when a function run in a thread has completed.)

You need to distinguish between two very different types of "time consuming operations". One consumes CPU time. In that case, Twisted will not make it concurrent for you; computationally intensive operations will prevent other code from running. You can put it in a thread (assuming it uses no Twisted APIs itself) or you can move it to a different process using spawnProcess.

A time-consuming network request/response, however, manifests itself as a call to write the data (which completes effectively instantly) and another call back later when the response has been received. This won't block Twisted from executing other code, since it returns to the main loop. It's this callback which a Deferrred encapsulates.

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Thanks for the explanation! The first paragraph makes it much more clear to me. I think you are one of the guys who created Twisted ... so thanks for that and the affort to answer my questions! [I felt a bit slain by the docs - maybe a simple explanation like your answer would make life easier for noobs like me.] –  ectomorph May 22 '13 at 19:26

Krondo.com has a Twisted tutorial that is far and away the best way to learn Twisted. The answer to your question about the Deferred class is given with excellent working code samples. Beginner and advanced topics are explained extremely well and in logical sequence.

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I knowingly broke the rules here. I did this because after five years using Twisted I think the best thing to do with new users is point them at that tutorial. Nothing else is remotely as helpful. It was nice of Glyph to answer here. However the volume of questions generated by new Twisted users faced with insufficient documentation here and elsewhere on the internet is so enormous that I thought it best in this case to point to a reliable and comprehensive resource. I probably should have made that a comment, not an answer, but I can't because I don't have the rep. Want me to delete? –  DanielSank Sep 21 '13 at 8:06
    
thanks, I think this makes sense to post the link here even if the question is answered. –  ectomorph Sep 22 '13 at 17:00
    
Apparently the guy who originally complained about my answer not being an answer deleted his comment. Weird. –  DanielSank Sep 22 '13 at 18:33

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