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How can I easily obtain the min and max values from a JavaScript Array?

Example code:

var arr = [100, 0, 50];

// something like (but it doesn't have to be)
arr.min(); // return 0
arr.max(); // return 100
share|improve this question
10  
Note: With ECMAScript 6 you can use the new spread operator (three dots: ...) with Math.max() like this: Math.max(...[2, 5, 16, 1]). See my answer made from the MDN documentation. – totymedli Jun 14 '15 at 21:26

34 Answers 34

How about augmenting the built-in Array object to use Math.max/Math.min instead:

Array.prototype.max = function() {
  return Math.max.apply(null, this);
};

Array.prototype.min = function() {
  return Math.min.apply(null, this);
};

Here is a JSFiddle.

Augmenting the built-ins can cause collisions with other libraries (some see), so you may be more comfortable with just apply'ing Math.xxx() to your array directly:

var min = Math.min.apply(null, arr),
    max = Math.max.apply(null, arr);

Alternately, assuming your browser supports ECMAScript 6, you can use the spread operator which functions similarly to the apply method:

var min = Math.min( ...arr ),
    max = Math.max( ...arr );
share|improve this answer
2  
Shouldn't that be "return Math.max.apply( Math, this );" and not return Math.max.apply( null, this ); – HankH Nov 3 '09 at 18:24
4  
@HankH: maybe. Math.max is akin to a "static" method, so there is no useful this instance inside of it (I hope). So assuming that is true, calling it would run it in the global scope (i.e. window), which is equivalent to passing null as the first paramter to apply/call. – Roatin Marth Nov 3 '09 at 18:26
6  
@HankH: passing null or Math or {} or whatever to apply() or call() has no bearing on the outcome. Math.max does not nor should not reference this internally. – Roatin Marth Nov 3 '09 at 18:43
12  
As a C# programmer I require strongly typed questions. – ChaosPandion Nov 3 '09 at 18:49
7  
Just sharing a jQuery mistake I was making with the code above which took me a long time to debug. A jquery array works fine on everything but the iPad. I had to convert the array to a true native array for it to work. Only affected the single device for some reason Math.max.apply(null, $.makeArray(array)); – Forrest Jul 25 '12 at 21:17
var max_of_array = Math.max.apply(Math, array);

For a full discussion see: http://aaroncrane.co.uk/2008/11/javascript_max_api/

share|improve this answer
1  
What is the difference between Math.max.apply(Math, array) and Math.max.apply(null, array)? The blog says "...you also have to redundantly say again that max belongs to Math...", but it seems I don't have to do so (by setting the first argument of apply as null). – ziyuang Dec 21 '15 at 13:45

For big arrays (~10⁷ elements), Math.min and Math.max both produces the following error in Node.js.

RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

A more robust solution is to not add every element to the call stack, but to instead pass an array:

function arrayMin(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function (p, v) {
    return ( p < v ? p : v );
  });
}

function arrayMax(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function (p, v) {
    return ( p > v ? p : v );
  });
}

If you are concerned about speed, the following code is ~3 times faster then Math.max.apply is on my computer. See http://jsperf.com/min-and-max-in-array/2.

function arrayMin(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, min = Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (arr[len] < min) {
      min = arr[len];
    }
  }
  return min;
};

function arrayMax(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, max = -Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (arr[len] > max) {
      max = arr[len];
    }
  }
  return max;
};

If your arrays contains strings instead of numbers, you also need to coerce them into numbers. The below code does that, but it slows the code down ~10 times on my machine. See http://jsperf.com/min-and-max-in-array/3.

function arrayMin(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, min = Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (Number(arr[len]) < min) {
      min = Number(arr[len]);
    }
  }
  return min;
};

function arrayMax(arr) {
  var len = arr.length, max = -Infinity;
  while (len--) {
    if (Number(arr[len]) > max) {
      max = Number(arr[len]);
    }
  }
  return max;
};
share|improve this answer

You do it by extending the Array type:

Array.max = function( array ){
    return Math.max.apply( Math, array );
};
Array.min = function( array ){
    return Math.min.apply( Math, array );
};

Boosted from here (by John Resig)

share|improve this answer

.apply is often used when the intention is to invoke a variadic function with a list of argument values, e.g.

The Math.max([value1[,value2, ...]]) function returns the largest of zero or more numbers.

Math.max(10, 20); // 20
Math.max(-10, -20); // -10
Math.max(-10, 20); // 20

The Math.max() method doesn't allow you to pass in an array. If you have a list of values of which you need to get the largest, you would normally call this function using Function.prototype.apply(), e.g.

Math.max.apply(null, [10, 20]); // 20
Math.max.apply(null, [-10, -20]); // -10
Math.max.apply(null, [-10, 20]); // 20

However, as of the ECMAScript 6 you can use the spread operator:

The spread operator allows an expression to be expanded in places where multiple arguments (for function calls) or multiple elements (for array literals) are expected.

Using the spread operator, the above can be rewritten as such:

Math.max(...[10, 20]); // 20
Math.max(...[-10, -20]); // -10
Math.max(...[-10, 20]); // 20

When calling a function using the variadic operator, you can even add additional values, e.g.

Math.max(...[10, 20], 50); // 50
Math.max(...[-10, -20], 50); // 50

Bonus:

Spread operator enables you to use the array literal syntax to create new arrays in situations where in ES5 you would need to fall back to imperative code, using a combination of push, splice, etc.

let foo = ['b', 'c'];
let bar = ['a', ...foo, 'd', 'e']; // ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']
share|improve this answer

Others have already given some solutions in which they augment Array.prototype. All I want in this answer is to clarify whether it should be Math.min.apply( Math, array ) or Math.min.apply( null, array ). So what context should be used, Math or null?

When passing null as a context to apply, then the context will default to the global object (the window object in the case of browsers). Passing the Math object as the context would be the correct solution, but it won't hurt passing null either. Here's an example when null might cause trouble, when decorating the Math.max function:

// decorate Math.max
(function (oldMax) {
    Math.max = function () {
        this.foo(); // call Math.foo, or at least that's what we want

        return oldMax.apply(this, arguments);
    };
})(Math.max);

Math.foo = function () {
    print("foo");
};

Array.prototype.max = function() {
  return Math.max.apply(null, this); // <-- passing null as the context
};

var max = [1, 2, 3].max();

print(max);

The above will throw an exception because this.foo will be evaluated as window.foo, which is undefined. If we replace null with Math, things will work as expected and the string "foo" will be printed to the screen (I tested this using Mozilla Rhino).

You can pretty much assume that nobody has decorated Math.max so, passing null will work without problems.

share|improve this answer
2  
Point taken. However why would someone decorate Foo.staticMethod and reference this? Would that not be a mistake in the design of the decorator? (unless of course they were wanting to reference the global scope, and want to remain independent of the JavaScript engine being used, eg Rhino). – Roatin Marth Nov 3 '09 at 18:57
1  
The spec is explicit about which specced functions should refer to "the this value" (indeed, that phrase appears 125 times in the specification). Math.max, implemented per spec, does not use this. If somebody overrides Math.max such that it does use this, then they have made its behaviour violate spec and you should throw sharp objects at them. You should not code around that possibility any more than you would code around the possibility that somebody has swapped Math.max and Math.min for the lulz. – Mark Amery Feb 14 '15 at 17:59

One more way to do it:

var arrayMax = Function.prototype.apply.bind(Math.max, null);

Usage:

var max = arrayMax([2, 5, 1]);
share|improve this answer

I am surprised not one mentiond the reduce function.

var arr = [1, 10, 5, 11, 2]

var b = arr.reduce(function(previous,current){ 
                      return previous > current ? previous:current
                   });

b => 11
arr => [1, 10, 5, 11, 2]
share|improve this answer
1  
I can't seem to use this in the current version of Chromium. – PJSCopeland Sep 23 '14 at 4:20

There is another way to get min and max for short arrays:

  var min = data.slice(0).sort(function(a,b){a>b})[0];
  var max = data.slice(0).sort(function(a,b){a<b})[0];

It's good way for work with non-numeric values and custom comparing rules:

> ["b","a","d","c"].slice(0).sort()[0];
'a'
> ["b","a","d","c"].slice(0).sort().reverse()[0];
'd'
> ["b","a","d","c"].slice(0).sort(function(a,b){return a > b;})[0];
'a'
> ["b","a","d","c"].slice(0).sort(function(a,b){return a < b;})[0];
'd'
share|improve this answer

Official Math.max() MDN documentation

The following function uses Function.prototype.apply() to find the maximum element in a numeric array. getMaxOfArray([1, 2, 3]) is equivalent to Math.max(1, 2, 3), but you can use getMaxOfArray() on programmatically constructed arrays of any size.

function getMaxOfArray(numArray) {
  return Math.max.apply(null, numArray);
}

Or with the new spread operator, getting the maximum of an array becomes a lot easier.

var arr = [1, 2, 3];
var max = Math.max(...arr);
share|improve this answer

You can use the following function anywhere in your project:

function getMin(array){
    return Math.min.apply(Math,array);
}

function getMax(array){
    return Math.max.apply(Math,array);
}

And then you can call the functions passing the array:

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7];
var maximo = getMax(myArray); //return the highest number
share|improve this answer

If you're paranoid like me about using Math.max.apply (which could error on large arrays), try this:

function arrayMax(array) {
  return array.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.max(a, b);
  };
}

function arrayMax(array) {
  return array.reduce(function(a, b) {
    return Math.min(a, b);
  };
}

Or, in ES6:

function arrayMax(array) {
  return array.reduce((a, b) => Math.max(a, b));
}

function arrayMin(array) {
  return array.reduce((a, b) => Math.min(a, b));
}

The anonymous functions are unfortunately necessary (instead of using Math.max.bind(Math) because reduce doesn't just pass a and b to its function, but also i and a reference to the array itself, so we have to ensure we don't try to call max on those as well.

share|improve this answer

This may suit your purposes.

Array.prototype.min = function(comparer) {

    if (this.length === 0) return null;
    if (this.length === 1) return this[0];

    comparer = (comparer || Math.min);

    var v = this[0];
    for (var i = 1; i < this.length; i++) {
        v = comparer(this[i], v);    
    }

    return v;
}

Array.prototype.max = function(comparer) {

    if (this.length === 0) return null;
    if (this.length === 1) return this[0];

    comparer = (comparer || Math.max);

    var v = this[0];
    for (var i = 1; i < this.length; i++) {
        v = comparer(this[i], v);    
    }

    return v;
}
share|improve this answer

I had the same problem, I needed to obtain the minimum and maximum values of an array and, to my surprise, there were no built-in functions for arrays. After reading a lot, I decided to test the "top 3" solutions myself:

  1. discrete solution: a FOR loop to check every element of the array against the current max and/or min value;
  2. APPLY solution: sending the array to the Math.max and/or Math.min internal functions using apply(null,array);
  3. REDUCE solution: recursing a check against every element of the array using reduce(function).

The test code was this:

function GetMaxDISCRETE(A)
{   var MaxX=A[0];

    for (var X=0;X<A.length;X++)
        if (MaxX<A[X])
            MaxX=A[X];

    return MaxX;
}

function GetMaxAPPLY(A)
{   return Math.max.apply(null,A);
}

function GetMaxREDUCE(A)
{   return A.reduce(function(p,c)
    {   return p>c?p:c;
    });
}

The array A was filled with 100,000 random integer numbers, each function was executed 10,000 times on Mozilla Firefox 28.0 on an intel Pentium 4 2.99GHz desktop with Windows Vista. The times are in seconds, retrieved by performance.now() function. The results were these, with 3 fractional digits and standard deviation:

  1. Discrete solution: mean=0.161s, sd=0.078
  2. APPLY solution: mean=3.571s, sd=0.487
  3. REDUCE solution: mean=0.350s, sd=0.044

The REDUCE solution was 117% slower than the discrete solution. The APPLY solution was the worse, 2,118% slower than the discrete solution. Besides, as Peter observed, it doesn't work for large arrays (about more than 1,000,000 elements).

Also, to complete the tests, I tested this extended discrete code:

var MaxX=A[0],MinX=A[0];

for (var X=0;X<A.length;X++)
{   if (MaxX<A[X])
        MaxX=A[X];
    if (MinX>A[X])
        MinX=A[X];
}

The timing: mean=0.218s, sd=0.094

So, it is 35% slower than the simple discrete solution, but it retrieves both the maximum and the minimum values at once (any other solution would take at least twice that to retrieve them). Once the OP needed both values, the discrete solution would be the best choice (even as two separate functions, one for calculating maximum and another for calculating minimum, they would outperform the second best, the REDUCE solution).

share|improve this answer

For big arrays (~10⁷ elements), Math.min and Math.max procuces a RangeError (Maximum call stack size exceeded) in node.js.

For big arrays, a quick & dirty solution is:

Array.prototype.min = function() {
    var r = this[0];
    this.forEach(function(v,i,a){if (v<r) r=v;});
    return r;
};
share|improve this answer

Iterate through, keeping track as you go.

var min = null;
var max = null;
for (var i = 0, len = arr.length; i < len; ++i)
{
    var elem = arr[i];
    if (min === null || min > elem) min = elem;
    if (max === null || max < elem) max = elem;
}
alert( "min = " + min + ", max = " + max );

This will leave min/max null if there are no elements in the array. Will set min and max in one pass if the array has any elements.

You could also extend Array with a range method using the above to allow reuse and improve on readability. See a working fiddle at http://jsfiddle.net/9C9fU/

Array.prototype.range = function() {

    var min = null,
        max = null,
        i, len;

    for (i = 0, len = this.length; i < len; ++i)
    {
        var elem = this[i];
        if (min === null || min > elem) min = elem;
        if (max === null || max < elem) max = elem;
    }

    return { min: min, max: max }
};

Used as

var arr = [3, 9, 22, -7, 44, 18, 7, 9, 15];

var range = arr.range();

console.log(range.min);
console.log(range.max);
share|improve this answer
1  
But, the fastest solution is not always the most optimal solution... – Jordan Dillon Chapian Jul 12 '14 at 17:52

Simple stuff, really.

var arr = [10,20,30,40];
arr.max = function() { return  Math.max.apply(Math, this); }; //attach max funct
arr.min = function() { return  Math.min.apply(Math, this); }; //attach min funct

alert("min: " + arr.min() + " max: " + arr.max());
share|improve this answer

If you are using prototype.js framework, then this code will work ok:

arr.min();
arr.max();

Documented here: Javascript prototype framework for max

share|improve this answer

If you use the library sugar.js, you can write arr.min() and arr.max() as you suggest. You can also get min and max values from non-numeric arrays.

min( map , all = false ) Returns the element in the array with the lowest value. map may be a function mapping the value to be checked or a string acting as a shortcut. If all is true, will return all min values in an array.

max( map , all = false ) Returns the element in the array with the greatest value. map may be a function mapping the value to be checked or a string acting as a shortcut. If all is true, will return all max values in an array.

Examples:

[1,2,3].min() == 1
['fee','fo','fum'].min('length') == "fo"
['fee','fo','fum'].min('length', true) == ["fo"]
['fee','fo','fum'].min(function(n) { return n.length; }); == "fo"
[{a:3,a:2}].min(function(n) { return n['a']; }) == {"a":2}
['fee','fo','fum'].max('length', true) == ["fee","fum"]

Libraries like Lo-Dash and underscore.js also provide similar powerful min and max functions:

Example from Lo-Dash:

_.max([4, 2, 8, 6]) == 8
var characters = [
  { 'name': 'barney', 'age': 36 },
  { 'name': 'fred',   'age': 40 }
];
_.max(characters, function(chr) { return chr.age; }) == { 'name': 'fred', 'age': 40 }
share|improve this answer

Here's one way to get the max value from an array of objects. Create a copy (with slice), then sort the copy in descending order and grab the first item.

var myArray = [
    {"ID": 1, "Cost": 200},
    {"ID": 2, "Cost": 1000},
    {"ID": 3, "Cost": 50},
    {"ID": 4, "Cost": 500}
]

maxsort = myArray.slice(0).sort(function(a, b) { return b.ID - a.ID })[0].ID; 
share|improve this answer

ChaosPandion's solution works if you're using protoype. If not, consider this:

Array.max = function( array ){
    return Math.max.apply( Math, array );
};

Array.min = function( array ){
    return Math.min.apply( Math, array );
};

The above will return NaN if an array value is not an integer so you should build some functionality to avoid that. Otherwise this will work.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't understand what you mean by "ChaosPandion's solution works if you're using protoype". How is your solution different, except you're using the Math object as the context? – Ionuț G. Stan Nov 3 '09 at 18:28
2  
Please explain how mine only works if you use prototype. – ChaosPandion Nov 3 '09 at 18:28
minHeight = Math.min.apply({},YourArray);
minKey    = getCertainKey(YourArray,minHeight);
maxHeight = Math.max.apply({},YourArray);
maxKey    = getCertainKey(YourArray,minHeight);
function getCertainKey(array,certainValue){
   for(var key in array){
      if (array[key]==certainValue)
         return key;
   }
} 
share|improve this answer

I like Linus's reduce() approach, especially for large arrays. But as long as you know you need both min and the max, why iterate over the array twice?

Array.prototype.minmax = function () {
  return this.reduce(function (p, v) {
    return [(p[0] < v ? p[0] : v), (p[1] > v ? p[1] : v)];
  }, [this[0], this[0]]);
}

Of course, if you prefer the iterative approach, you can do that too:

Array.prototype.minmax = function () {
    var mn = this[0], mx = this[0];
    this.forEach(function (v) {
        if (v < mn) mn = v;
        if (v > mx) mx = v;
    });
    return [mn, mx];
};
share|improve this answer

create a simple object

var myArray = new Array();

myArray = [10,12,14,100];

var getMaxHeight = {
     hight : function( array ){ return Math.max.apply( Math, array );
}

getMaxHeight.hight(myArray);
share|improve this answer
1  
why do you actually need an object for that? It's just a function that you're using in the end. And also, why are you defining your array twice? – gion_13 Sep 17 '13 at 5:57

Using Math.max() or Math.min()

Math.max(10, 20);   //  20
Math.min(-10, -20); // -20

The following function uses Function.prototype.apply() to find the maximum element in a numeric array. getMaxOfArray([1, 2, 3]) is equivalent to Math.max(1, 2, 3), but you can use getMaxOfArray() on programmatically constructed arrays of any size.

function getMaxOfArray(numArray) {
  return Math.max.apply(null, numArray);
}

Or with the new spread operator, getting the maximum of an array becomes a lot easier.

var arr = [1, 2, 3];
var max = Math.max(...arr); // 3
var min = Math.min(...arr); // 1
share|improve this answer

You can use Array.sort but you'll have to write a simple number sorting function since the default is alphabetic.

Look at example 2 here.

Then you can grab arr[0] and arr[arr.length-1] to get min and max.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Ates Goral - certainly, but surely you can understand that a sorted list allows O(1) access to the min and max values, yes? – Peter Bailey Nov 3 '09 at 19:09
2  
Performance wise the sort would have a lot more swapping going on. That has to come in to consideration. – ChaosPandion Nov 3 '09 at 19:12

Is this homework? You need to add a prototype to the array class which defines a function for min and max and then write some code that traverses the array storing the greatest or least value it's found.

For fun, I'm going to do half of this for you with jQuery:

x=Array();
jQuery.extend(x,{
  min:function(){
    var n=Number.MAX_VALUE;
    for(i=0;i<this.length;i++){
      if(this[i]<n){
        n=this[i];
    }}
    return n;},
    max:function(){var n=Number.MIN_VALUE;for(i=0;i<this.length;i++){if(this[i]>n){n=this[i];}}return n;}
});
share|improve this answer
1  
I am not downing your answer, but I must ask why you have all the code scrunched together? – ChaosPandion Nov 3 '09 at 19:08

If you need performance then this is the best way for small arrays:

var min = 99999;
var max = 0;
for(var i = 0; i < v.length; i++)
{
    if(v[i] < min)
    {
        min = v[i];
    }
    if(v[i] >= max)
    {
        max = v[i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    function maximumNumber() {
        debugger;
        var numberValue = document.myForm.number.value.split(",");
        var numberArray = [];

        for (var i = 0, len = numberValue.length; i < len; i += 1) {

            numberArray.push(+numberValue[i]);

            var largestNumber = numberArray.reduce(function (x, y) {
                return (x > y) ? x : y;
            });
        }

        document.getElementById("numberOutput").value = largestNumber;

    }

    function minimumNumber() {
        debugger;
        var numberValue = document.myForm.number.value.split(",");
        var numberArray = [];

        for (var i = 0, len = numberValue.length; i < len; i += 1) {

            numberArray.push(+numberValue[i]);

            var smallestNumber = numberArray.reduce(function (x, y) {
                return (x < y) ? x : y;
            });
        }

        document.getElementById("numberOutput").value = smallestNumber;

    }


        function restrictCharacters(evt) {

            evt = (evt) ? evt : window.event;
            var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode;
            if (((charCode >= '48') && (charCode <= '57')) || (charCode == '44')) {
                return true;
            }
            else {
                return false;
            }
        }

<div>    
        <form name="myForm">
        <table>
        <tr>
            <td>Insert Number</td>

            <td><input type="text" name="number" id="number" onkeypress="return restrictCharacters(event);" /></td>

            <td><input type="button" value="Maximum" onclick="maximumNumber();" /></td>

            <td><input type="button" value="Minimum" onclick="minimumNumber();"/></td>

            <td><input type="text" id="numberOutput" name="numberOutput" /></td>

        </tr>
        </table>
        </form>
    </div>
share|improve this answer

To prevent "max" and "min" to be listed in a "for ... in" loop:

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "max", {
    enumerable: false,
    configurable: false,
    writable: false,    
    value: function() {
        return Math.max.apply(null, this);
    }
});
Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "min", {
    enumerable: false,
    configurable: false,
    writable: false,    
    value: function() {
        return Math.min.apply(null, this);
    }
});

Usage:

var x = [10,23,44,21,5];
x.max(); //44
x.min(); //5
share|improve this answer

protected by mkoryak Dec 18 '14 at 2:56

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