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Below is a portion of code I'm using to get the href or src of an image of known class or id. The console.log() returns null, even though it is in an if statement checking that the attribute later used isn't null. Of course, trying to get href or src of null doesn't end well.

for(var i = 0 ; (i < sitelist[site].img_id.length) && (img === undefined) ; i++)
{
    if(document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]) !== undefined)
    {
        if(document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]) !== null)
        {
            console.log(document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_class[i]));
            if(document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_class[i]).href !== undefined)
            {
                img =   document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_class[i]).href;
            }
            if(document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_class[i]).src !== undefined)
            {
                img =   document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_class[i]).src;
            }
        }
    }
}

Is there a specific way of checking if something is null, or is the problem elsewhere?

share|improve this question
    
There is no null in javascript –  Prasath K May 22 '13 at 12:39
3  
@PrasathK yes there is. Maybe not the same like in languages such as C or C# but null is an object thus it exists. –  Shadow Wizard May 22 '13 at 12:41
1  
Better reference, in my opinion: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Andrew May 22 '13 at 12:46
1  
@Andrew—best reference is ECMA-262. –  RobG May 22 '13 at 12:54
1  
@Andrew Then use the more readable version: es5.github.io :) –  Ian May 24 '13 at 5:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your null and undefined tests are correct, though longer than needed.

Your actual issue is that you're testing for .img_id[i], but then using .img_class[i].

Here's a more concise version of your existing code.

for(var i = 0 ; (i < sitelist[site].img_id.length) && (img === undefined) ; i++) { 

// Here you're testing the `img_id[i]`
    var img_id = document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]);

    if(img_id != null) {

// Here you're trying to use a different element
        var img_clss = document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_class[i]);
        console.log(img_clss);

        if(img_clss.href !== undefined) {
            img =   img_clss.href;
        }
        if(img_clss.src !== undefined) {
            img = img_clss.src;
        }
    }
}

Unless the values are the same, testing for one isn't going to tell you if a different one exists.

I don't know what the intent is, but perhaps you just need to change the element inside the if.

for(var i = 0 ; (i < sitelist[site].img_id.length) && (img === undefined) ; i++) { 
    // Here you're testing the `img_id[i]`
    var img_id = document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]);

    if(img_id != null) {
        // Now we're using the same element that we tested!
        console.log(img_id);

        if(img_id.href !== undefined) {
            img = img_id.href;
        }
        if(img_id.src !== undefined) {
            img = img_id.src;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! The real problem was truly that I was checking img_id then using img_class. Shame on me. I will ameliorate its readability and compactness though. –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 13:10
    
You're welcome. –  squint May 22 '13 at 13:13

You can just try the below code.

Replace

if (document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]) !== undefined) {
    if (document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]) !== null) {
        // ...
    }
}

with

if (document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i])) {
    // process here
}

You are checking null and undefined continuously in next statement. You can just try with element only.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems like a good idea, but it still doesn't work. –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 12:52
    
    
it will work defiantly u have to use in correct way –  SivaRajini May 22 '13 at 12:55
    
The problem wasn't on the structure but on the variables used. The test was on img_id and img_class was used. Your answer is perfectly true, but the problem wasn't there. –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 13:13

To test if the element is found, simply use

var elem = document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]);
if (elem) {
   // proceed from there

Note that I also declared a variable. Repeating your document.getElementById(sitelist[site].img_id[i]) makes your code hard to read (and thus debug and maintain).

share|improve this answer
    
I agree for the readability part, but isn't it bad concerning the time required to execute the code? –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 12:57
    
@CaramelTruffle On the contrary : it avoids fetching the element more than once. –  Denys Séguret May 22 '13 at 13:01
    
I will remember it and start using it then. Thanks. –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 13:11

Replace

   id[i]) !== undefined

with

   id[i]) != undefined 

in all statements

share|improve this answer
    
Still doesn't work. Do I need to change the !== null too? –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 12:44
    
@CaramelTruffle yes you need to change in all places –  PSR May 22 '13 at 12:47
    
@CaramelTruffle did you tried this by replacing in alla places –  PSR May 22 '13 at 12:53
    
I will remember it, thanks. The source of the problem seems to be somewhere else though. Edit: And yes, I replaced all !== by != –  Caramel Truffle May 22 '13 at 12:53

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