Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to implement a debit-credit resolution system, but I am having a hard time expressing the logic based on sets.

Suppose I have a table of Orders:

Id    OrderId     Amount     AdjustmentFlag
 1       1           10.00        0
 2       1           10.00        1
 3       1           10.00        2
 4       2           20.00        1
 5       2           20.00        2
 6       2           20.00        2
 7       3           30.00        1
 8       4           40.00        0
 9       4           40.00        0
10       4           40.00        1
11       5           50.00        0
12       5           50.00        1
13       5           60.00        2
14       5           60.00        1
15       5           60.00        2
16       5           70.00        1

I need to pick out the Ids that are still valid based on if they have a matching "cancelled" flag.

0 - Original Order
1 - Cancelled Order
2 - Adjusted Order
  1. A 1 matches a 0 or a 2 with preference to 0.
  2. A 1 flag is ignored if they have no match.

Given the above example:

  • Id 2 would match Id 1 which leaves Id 3.
  • Id 4 would match either Id 5 or Id 6 but not both.
  • Id 7 would be ignored.
  • Id 10 would match either Id 8 or Id 9 but not both.
  • Id 12 would match Id 11.
  • Id 14 would match either Id 13 or Id 15 but not both.
  • Id 16 would be ignored.

The possible outcomes would be [1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16] (lower Id has preference) or [1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16] (higher Id has preference). Either will work as long as the result is deterministic.

Create script:

CREATE TABLE [Order]
(
     Id INT IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
    ,OrderId INT NOT NULL
    ,Amount MONEY NOT NULL
    ,AdjustmentFlag TINYINT NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO [Order](OrderId, Amount, AdjustmentFlag)
SELECT 1, 10.00, 0
UNION ALL
SELECT 1, 10.00, 1
UNION ALL
SELECT 1, 10.00, 2
UNION ALL
SELECT 2, 20.00, 1
UNION ALL
SELECT 2, 20.00, 2
UNION ALL
SELECT 2, 20.00, 2
UNION ALL
SELECT 3, 30.00, 1
UNION ALL
SELECT 4, 40.00, 0
UNION ALL
SELECT 4, 40.00, 0
UNION ALL
SELECT 4, 40.00, 1
UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 50.00, 0
UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 50.00, 1
UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 60.00, 2
UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 60.00, 1
UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 60.00, 2
UNION ALL
SELECT 5, 70.00, 1

Here is my current partial solution:

WITH Orders AS
(
    SELECT
        Id,
        OrderId,
        Amount,
        AdjustmentFlag,
        EffectiveOrder = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY OrderId, Amount ORDER BY AdjustmentFlag DESC),
        UnmatchedOrder = CASE WHEN EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM [Order] uo WHERE uo.OrderId = o.OrderId GROUP BY uo.OrderId HAVING(COUNT(uo.OrderId) = 1)) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END,
        OriginalWithoutAdjustment = CASE WHEN EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM [Order] uo WHERE uo.OrderId = o.OrderId AND uo.Amount = o.Amount GROUP BY uo.OrderId, uo.Amount HAVING (MAX(uo.AdjustmentFlag) = 1)) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END,
        AdjustmentWithoutOriginal = CASE WHEN EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM [Order] uo WHERE uo.OrderId = o.OrderId AND uo.Amount = o.Amount GROUP BY uo.OrderId, uo.Amount HAVING (MIN(uo.AdjustmentFlag) = 1)) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
    FROM [Order] o
)
,MatchedOrders AS
(
    SELECT
        Id
    FROM Orders
    WHERE
    -- Assume AdjustmentFlag = 2 and take everything else
    EffectiveOrder <> 1
    OR
    (
        -- Assume AdjustmentFlag = 2 and there is no Order with AdjustmentFlag = 0
        -- Take everything since the MIN AdjustmentFlag = 1
        AdjustmentWithoutOriginal = 1
        AND EffectiveOrder > 1
    )
    OR
    (
        -- Assume AdjustmentFlag = 1 and there are no other Orders, so ignore it
        AdjustmentFlag = 1
        AND UnmatchedOrder = 1
    )
    OR
    (
        -- We don't care about the orders if they don't have any Amount
        Amount = 0
        AND EffectiveOrder = 1
    )
    AND NOT
    (
        -- We have an Original without any other Orders
        EffectiveOrder = 1
        AND UnmatchedOrder = 1
        AND AdjustmentFlag = 0
    )
)
SELECT
    o.OrderId,
    o.AdjustmentFlag,
    o.Amount,
    o.EffectiveOrder,
    o.UnmatchedOrder,
    Excluded = CASE WHEN mo.Id IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END
FROM Orders o
LEFT OUTER JOIN MatchedOrders mo
ON o.Id = mo.Id
ORDER BY OrderId, Amount, AdjustmentFlag

Result:

Result

share|improve this question
    
Will a cancelled order's Amount always exactly match the Amount for either an original or an adjusted order, for the same OrderId? Can you have multiple cancelled order records for the same OrderId? –  Mark Bannister May 22 '13 at 12:58
    
Yes a cancelled order must match exactly. Yes there can multiple cancelled orders, I will post an example. –  Romoku May 22 '13 at 13:01
    
Where I used to work, this was called Reconciliation. –  Jodrell May 22 '13 at 13:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try:

with cte as
(select o.*, 
        case AdjustmentFlag when 1 then -1 else 1 end DrCr,
        row_number() over (partition by OrderId, Amount, case AdjustmentFlag when 1 then 1 end
                           order by AdjustmentFlag, Id) Rn
 from [Order] o)
select OrderId,
       max(case DrCr when 1 then Id end) DrId,
       sum(case DrCr when 1 then Amount else 0 end) DrAmount,
       max(case DrCr when 1 then AdjustmentFlag end) DrAdjustmentFlag,
       max(case DrCr when -1 then Id end) CrId,
       sum(case DrCr when -1 then Amount else 0 end) CrAmount,
       max(case DrCr when -1 then AdjustmentFlag end) CrAdjustmentFlag,
       sum(DrCr * Amount) BalanceAmount
from cte
group by OrderId, Amount, Rn
having sum(DrCr * Amount) >= 0 /* excludes unmatched cancelled orders */

- If you only want to see unmatched Original/Amended orders, change the having clause condition to > 0.

SQLFiddle here.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I guess I was thinking backwards (get all Ids that are matched) since this will get me all the Ids that are not cancelled (final action) which is what I wanted. Thank you. –  Romoku May 22 '13 at 13:38
    
@Romoku: Glad I could help. –  Mark Bannister May 22 '13 at 13:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.