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I have a trouble with finding answer for my questions (Q), so I registered here to ask you guys how it really works (or don't works) ;)

I am writing in c++, in Visual Studio 2012, but still don't really know how it is with #includes, namespaces etc. in header files. Do I even need to use them?

(Q1): Let's say I have one .cpp file and few .h files, which are using, for example: vectors, things from <algorithm>, <ctime> and some other libraries, but I do not write #include <something> in header files, only in .cpp. Is it correct? Or should I include everything I use in every header?

Usually everything works for me, I can even say it always "works", because I don't have too much experience yet and I was usually containing everything in one .cpp and 1 or 2 headers with some void functions. But don't know if it works because it should, or because, for example, mu compiler allows that and in some issues it can cause errors.

(Q2): Now a thing about using namespace std; In some cases functions in .h files works without it, but sometimes not. For example, the voids that are working (just simple voids for merge-sort):

#ifndef LISTA_1_H
#define LISTA_1_H

#include "Lista_0_Zadanie_1.h"

void MERGE(vector<double> &A, int p, int q, int r)
{
int i = p;
int j = q+1;
int lenght = r - p + 1;
int k=0;
vector<double> merged;
merged.assign (lenght,0);
while((i<=q)&&(j<=r))
    {   
    if(A[i] <= A[j])
        {
        merged[k]=A[i];
        ++i;
        }
    else
        {
        merged[k]=A[j];
        ++j;
        }
    k++;
    }

if(j<=r)
    {
    while(j<=r)
        {
        merged[k]=A[j];
        ++j;
        ++k;
        }
    }
if(i<=q)
    {
    while(i<=q)
        {
        merged[k]=A[i];
        ++i;
        ++k;
        }
    }
for (i=0;i<lenght;++i)
    A[p+i]=merged[i];
}


void MERGESORT(vector<double> &A, int k, int l) 
{
if(k<l)
    {
    int m = (k+l)/2;
    //int mp = m+1;
    //  cout << "koza"<<endl;
    MERGESORT(A,k,m);
    MERGESORT(A,m+1,l);
    MERGE(A,k,m,l);
    }
}

void TRIPLE_MERGESORT(vector<double> &A, int k, int l)  
{
if(k<l)
    {
    int one_third = (l-k)/3;
    int two_third = 2*(l-k)/3;          // k < k+one_third < k+two_third < l
    TRIPLE_MERGESORT(A,k,k+one_third);
    TRIPLE_MERGESORT(A,k+one_third+1,k+two_third);
    TRIPLE_MERGESORT(A,k+two_third+1,l);
    MERGE(A,k,k+one_third,k+two_third);
    MERGE(A,k,k+two_third,l);
    }
}

void INSERT_MERGESORT (vector<double> &A, int k, int l)
{
if(l<19)        // l=n-1, więc n<20 <=> l < 19
    {
    double y;
    int i,j;
    for(i=0; i<l+1; ++i)
        {
        y = A[i];
        j = i-1;
        while((j>=0) && (A[j]>y) )
            {
            A[j+1] = A[j];          
            --j;
            }
        A[j+1]=y;
        }
    }
else
    MERGESORT(A,k,l);
}

#endif

... and in some cases it does not work, if I do not write "using namespace std;" or add " std:: " in correct place (here before vectors), it does not work:

#ifndef SCHEMAT_HORNERA_H
#define SCHEMAT_HORNERA_H
//using namespace std;

 void HORNER( int n, double z0, double p_z0, vector<double> a, vector<double> &B)
{
B[n] = a[n];

for(int k = n-1; k>=0; --k)
    {
    B[k] = a[k] + z0*B[k+1];
    }   
}
#endif

So here's my question: Should I always use "std::" or "using namespace std"? If yes, why are my files until now "working"? Because in some cases VS allows for that, while it is not correct and some compilers and not allow for this?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Peter Wood, Bart van Ingen Schenau, unkulunkulu, Soner Gönül, alecxe May 23 '13 at 5:46

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Always use std:: in headers at least. –  chris May 22 '13 at 14:55
1  
To clarify, another way of saying what @chris is saying is: "never do using namespace std in a header" –  John Dibling May 22 '13 at 15:06
    
You should ask multiple questions separately –  Bart van Ingen Schenau May 22 '13 at 15:15
    
Thank you for all yours enlightening answers :) (Will vote up for them when I will have enough reputation.) I will start using prefixes and be careful about what I include and where. –  Kusavil May 22 '13 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Q1) Whether or not you need to #include a header with a full definition depends on if you need a full definition, or if just a forward-declare will do. In the case of needing just a forward-declaration, all you need to tell the compiler is the name of something. An example is if you need a pointer-to-something:

// fw-decl Foo
class Foo;

// define Gizmo
class Gizmo
{
public:
  void DoIt();
  Foo* mFoo;  // just need a pointer, so don't need a full definition of foo
};

Later you will need a full definition if you actually use the Foo object, as with:

#include "foo.h"
#include "gizmo.h"

void Foo::DoIt()
{
  mFoo->DoSomething(); // now we need a full definition
}

On the other hand, if the compiler needs to know for example how big Foo is, then you need a full definition.

#include "foo.h"

class Gizmo
{
public:
  Foo mFoo;  // need a full definition here
};

As a general rule of thumb, it is best to provide full definitions only when necesarry, so as to keep compilation times as quick as possible.

Q2) Simplified rule-of-thumb: never using namespace std. If you simply follow this rule of thumb without ever thinking about it, you will never have problems with namespace collisions, polluting the global namespace, or other nastiness.

Of course, this rule of thumb is a little over-simplified for those who actually think for a living, so here's a slightly better one:

1) Never using namespace in a header 2) Never using namespace in a source file unless it's your own namespace you're implementing.

Rules of thumb can be overly restrictive, and this is no exception, but it will get you on your way without venturing too far in to a landmine. The problem with using anmespace is it brings whatever is in that namespace in to global scope. Suppose you have your own header file:

mystring.h

namespace MyString
{
    class string
    {
      // ...
    };
}

...and then in the source file:

#include "mystring.h"
#include <string>

using namespace MyString;
using namespace std;

string s;  // OOPS:  which "string" is this?  MyString::string, or std::string?

This ambiguity is obvious here, but int he real world it can be much less obvious, and result in some very hard-to-detect bugs.

share|improve this answer

(Q1) It is important to remember what an include declaration actually does. Basically it is nothing more than a simple copy/paste of the entire file which is being included in the new file.

Since header files are included in many places, it is generally frowned upon to have many unnecessary includes in .h files (unless using templates). In general, do not include in a header file when a forward declaration will suffice.

In the .cpp file, include ALL files necessary so that the program can compile.

Because you are using visual studio, you must be careful because it is very lenient on including files from the standard library that you actually forgot to include, and you may experience problems compiling on other systems.

(Q2) In a header file you should not have a "using" statement. Remember that the include statement is a simple copy/paste; so for that reason if you have a using statement it will be included in the new file as well.

In .h files you should always use std::vector, std::set, etc.

In .cpp files, it is ok to have using namespace std, using std::vector, etc.

(Sidebar) Related to your code, you should split it up into header files and cpp files. Do not have the definition in the .h file, only the declaration. Make a .cpp file and define the algorithm in there. Also do not have define guards in a .cpp file. Never include a .cpp file!

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