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To give you an idea, I'm trying to accomplish grabbing any string with this information.

IP Address for: John Doe on 05/20/13

I basically need to find all strings in that format..

I am using date '+%m/%d/%y' to grab the date for today.

Essentially I need:

"'IP Address for: '[A-Za-z]'on 'date ''+%m/%d/%y''"

EDIT:

Example Strings

IP Address for: John Doe on 05/20/13
another random string
IP Address for: Jane Doe on 05/20/13
IP Address for: John Appleseed on 05/20/13
random string
IP Address for: Mr. Beans on 05/14/13
IP Address for: Steve Jobs on 05/03/13
IP Address for: Bill Gates on 05/19/13

What I need returned would be this. It fits the criteria of having "IP Address for: "+" on "+"date"

IP Address for: John Doe on 05/20/13
IP Address for: Jane Doe on 05/20/13
IP Address for: John Appleseed on 05/20/13
share|improve this question
    
What parts of the string changes? What part do you need to capture? Please provide a few sample strings, and the output you want. – Inbar Rose May 22 '13 at 14:59
    
I went ahead and added examples. – Matthew May 22 '13 at 15:24
    
I went ahead and gave you a nice method. – Inbar Rose May 22 '13 at 15:57
    
Will that be the only information on the line? – adayzdone May 22 '13 at 16:02

I wrote a nice method for you.

import re

s = '''
IP Address for: John Doe on 05/20/13
another random string
IP Address for: Jane Doe on 05/20/13
IP Address for: John Appleseed on 05/20/13
random string
IP Address for: Mr. Beans on 05/14/13
IP Address for: Steve Jobs on 05/03/13
IP Address for: Bill Gates on 05/19/13
'''

regex = re.compile(r'IP Address for: (.+) on (\d\d/\d\d/\d\d)')

def method(data, matcher, name=None, date=None):
    '''
    Takes data and runs the matcher on it to find name and date.
    ARGS:
    data    := the data (string, or fileobject)
    matcher := the regex object to match with.
    name    := specify only specific name to find (optional)
    date    := specify only specific date to find (optional)
    '''
    if isinstance(data, str):
        content = data.split('\n')
    elif isinstance(data, file):
        content = data
    for line in content:
        line = line.strip()
        ms = matcher.match(line)
        if not ms:
            continue
        if name and ms.group(1) != name:
            continue
        if date and ms.group(2) != date:
            continue
        yield ms.groups()

Using it:

# no options
for result in method(s, regex):
    print result   

('John Doe', '05/20/13')
('Jane Doe', '05/20/13')
('John Appleseed', '05/20/13')
('Mr. Beans', '05/14/13')
('Steve Jobs', '05/03/13')
('Bill Gates', '05/19/13')

# with a name
for result in method(s, regex, name='John Doe'):
    print result

('John Doe', '05/20/13')

# with a date
for result in method(s, regex, date='05/20/13'):
    print result 

('John Doe', '05/20/13')
('Jane Doe', '05/20/13')
('John Appleseed', '05/20/13')
share|improve this answer

For the AppleScript tag:

set myText to "Starting Text
IP Address for: Mr. Beans on 05/14/13
Leading Text IP Address for: Steve Jobs on 05/03/13 Trailing Text
Middle Text
IP Address for: Bill Gates on 05/19/13
Ending Text
"

set variableName to do shell script "grep -Eo 'IP Address for:.*on ([[:digit:]]{2}/){2}[[:digit:]]{2}' <<< " & quoted form of myText
share|improve this answer

If the format is always locked to that, you can search wider on the name. You can also go very general on the date matching, if you do not care for validation.

When we write a regex, we never include the string quotes unless we're showing it together with a code example.

An example of matching for your string,

IP Address for: John Doe on 05/20/13

could be the following regex:

1. 
IP Address for: .+ on (\d\d/\d\d/\d\d)

This will get you the date in group 1, but it will allow any character to be used for name, and allow any number to be used for the dates. If you wish to limit what characters are allowed, you can do that by replacing that with a character group, like you had in your example:

[A-Za-z]+

The problem with that character group is that you cannot match spaces, and it wouldn't work for John Doe. In order to match the space between the names, you either need to include that in the character group

2.
[A-Za-z\s]+

or match multiple words.

3.
([A-Za-z]+\s?)+

The advantage of the latter one here, is that it will not recognize the case where there is no name, or the name doesn't contain any a-z characters.

A couple of examples:

IP Address for: .$%1 on 05/20/13       matches 1.
IP Address for:   on 05/20/13          matches 1. and 2.
IP Address for: John Doe on 05/20/13   matches 1., 2. and 3.

So depending on how the input looks, you may wish to avoid regexes with .* in them. People use them all the time, and it usually works fine, but I try never to use the dot unless I can't find any other way.

share|improve this answer

Given your mention of date, I am assuming you only want lines that match today's date, for whatever date you make the check.

$ grep "IP Address for: .* on $(date +'%m/%d/%Y')" file.txt
share|improve this answer

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