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I've been learning C on my own and have been re-working a program out of the C Primer book. I was hoping a fresh set of eyes could possibly spot the one issue that I'm having. As you can see by my output vs expected output I would like to get rid of the line "0 is a number". I believe a re-tooling of the while loop is the issue, but I can't seem to get rid of it despite the variations I've tried.

Output:

    Enter some integers. Enter 0 to end.
    1 two 3 0 4
    1 is a number.
    two is not an integer
    3 is a number.
    0 is a number.

Expected output:

    Enter some integers. Enter 0 to end.
    1 two 3 0 4
    1 is a number.
    two is not an integer
    3 is a number.
#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int get_int(void); //validate that input is an integer

int main(void)
{
    int integers;

    printf("Enter some integers. Enter 0 to end.\n");
    while (integers != 0)
    {
        integers = get_int();
        printf("%d is a number\n", integers);
    }
    return(0);

} // end main

int get_int(void)
{
    int input;
    char ch;

    while (scanf("%d", &input) != 1)
    {
        while (!isspace(ch = getchar()) )
            putchar(ch); //dispose of bad input
        printf(" is not an integer\n"); 
    }    
    return input;
 }// end get_int
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3  
Note that your loop as currently written is not guaranteed to execute at all. It is possible that integers would contain 0 before the loop is executed. Using uninitialized variables leads to bugs. If you compile with optimization and warnings, GCC will report that (gcc -O3 -Wall should do it; I use -Wextra too routinely). Incidentally, IIRC, on Solaris, the stack is mostly zeroed, so there'd be a fairly good chance that integers is zero on entry to the program. –  Jonathan Leffler May 22 '13 at 16:02
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What I would do is move the call to get_int into the condition of the while loop:

int main(void)
{
    int integers;

    printf("Enter some integers. Enter 0 to end.\n");
    while ((integers = get_int()) != 0)
    {
        printf("%d is a number\n", integers);
    }
    return(0);

} // end main

The problem with your existing code is that between calling get_int() and printing the value, you're not checking to see if it's returned your sentinel of 0.

The other option would be to add an if (integers == 0) { break; } condition in between, but in my mind doing the assignment in the condition is cleaner.

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I've been known to write this loop this way myself, but if the initial processing and condition are any more complicated than this, I think the internal "break" statement is clearer. One case that comes up a lot is for (;;) { c = getchar(); if (c == EOF || c == terminator) break; ... } -- you can write that entirely inside a while condition but only by assigning-and-testing c on the left side of a && and testing it again on the right, which is like to confuse people. –  Zack May 22 '13 at 16:47
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You are correct to suspect that you need to retool the while loop. Did you try something like this?

 for (;;)
 {
     integers = get_int();
     if (integers == 0) break;
     printf("%d is a number\n", integers);
 }

Also, your get_int would be better written with fgets (or getline if available) and strtol. scanf is seductively convenient but almost always more trouble than it's worth.

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1  
This is one of Knuth's 'loop-and-a-half' constructs, which you can find more about with a Google search on 'Knuth loop-and-a-half'. –  Jonathan Leffler May 22 '13 at 16:04
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The simplest way is to put your condition and assignment into the while-loop. Right now your code relies on integer being set in the loop, then loops again to check if it's zero.

while((integer = get_int()) != 0)

will let you check at the same time as assigning integer. Don't forget the parenthesis, or your integer value will be the result of integer = (get_int != 0), because != has higher priority than = in C and C++.

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Consider the core of your loop:

integers = get_int();
printf("%d is a number\n", integers);

No matter what get_int() returns, the printf line will be executed. That line needs a separate if:

integers = get_int();
if (integers != 0) printf("%d is a number\n", integers);
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But repeating the loop condition in the body of the loop is ugly. What you've done works, but it is ugly! –  Jonathan Leffler May 22 '13 at 15:59
    
@JonathanLeffler I had quite a think before I posted the answer. There are various ways of solving this problem: using break (as per Zack) - adds a line, adds a conditional, uses break (so harder to follow flow imho); add a conditional (as per me) ugly as you say from a code purist point of view but easy for someone learning the language to learn from or John Ledbetter's solution (ideal from the code purist point of view but puts a lot of functionality into one line which can be harder for a learner to grasp from). Caveat Emptor! –  Neil Townsend May 22 '13 at 16:07
    
www-cs-faculty.stanford.edu/~eroberts//papers/SIGCSE-1995/… makes a really compelling argument IMNSHO for the break-in-the-middle being easier to understand than any of the alternatives. –  Zack May 22 '13 at 16:51
    
@Zack guess it's just me that find's break hard to follow - it always leaves me with a feeling of insecurity - break to where? But I guess that's just me :-) The good thing is to see all three answers up here - as an overall learning experience for the OP, it's ideal, I would think. –  Neil Townsend May 22 '13 at 17:35
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