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I'm writing a perl script to analyze error codes and determining whether or not they are unique. The error is unique depending on what line it's on. A standard error message may be:

RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement.
    "/user/foo/project", line 218, for ..

A lot of these error messages have multiple numbers in the strings that I'm grabbing. So, what I want to be able to do, is grab the first occurrence of a number after the word "line" and add it to an array ONLY if that value isn't present in the array. Here's what I've got so far:

my $path = RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement.
    "/user/foo/project", line 218
$path =~ m/(\d+)/;
print("Error occurs on line $1\n"); 
if(grep(/^$1$/, @RTarray))
{
    print("Not unique.\n");
}
else
{
    push(@RTarray, $1); 
    print("Found a unique error!\n");
}

So, obviously I'm not checking to see if it's after the keyword "line" cause I'm not quite sure how to do that based on how I'm dealing with the regex currently. Additionally, I don't think I'm adding elements to my array correctly. Help, please!

share|improve this question
    
Try using $path =~ m/line (\d+)/; – Jerry May 22 '13 at 15:55
    
Heh, I feel silly. That worked! Now how come my grep command is always returning true? I have a blank, uninitialized array and it always prints "Not Unique." ? – Scott James Walter May 22 '13 at 16:00
    
Why not use hash keys instead of beating around the bush? – Zaid May 22 '13 at 16:06
    
My array should be changing constantly, I'm not entirely sure how to integrate a hash map into my code, and my array won't ever be particularly big (maybe 500 elements or so). – Scott James Walter May 22 '13 at 16:15
    
Are you trying to parse log files, or catch the error and check it against some file or database? – qwwqwwq May 22 '13 at 16:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use a hash for that. It has the uniqueness built in and you don't even have to check.

Here's an example:

my %seen;

while (my $line = <$fh>) {

  if ($line =~ m/line (\d+)/) {
    my $ln = $1;
    if ( ! $seen{$ln}++ ) { 
      # this will check first and then increment. If it was encountered before,
      # it will already contain a true value, and thus the block will be skipped.
      # if it has not been encountered before, it will go into the block and...

      # do various operations on the line number
    }
  }

}

Your %seen now contains all lines that have errors, and how many per line:

print Dumper \%seen:

$VAR1 = {
  10 => 1,
  255 => 5,
  1337 => 1,
}

This tells us that there was one error in line 10 and one in line 1337. Those are unique according to your code. The five errors in line 255 are not unique because the appeared five times in the log.


If you want to get rid of some of them, use delete to delete the whole key/value-pair, or $foo{$1}-- to decrement or something like delete $foo{$1} unless --$foo{$1} to decrement and get rid of it in one line.


Edit: I've looked at your code. Actually, the only thing missing is the regex and the quotes. Have you actually tried it? It works. :)

my @RTarray;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
  $line =~ m/line (\d+)/;
  print("Error occurs on line $1\n"); 
  if( grep { $_ eq $1 } @RTarray ) { # this eq is the same as your regex, just faster
    print("Not unique.\n");
  } else {
    print "Found a unique error in line $1!\n";
    push @RTarray, $1; 
  }
}

__DATA__
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 218, for
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 3, for
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 44, for
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 218, for
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 7, for
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 7, for
RT Warning: No condition matches in 'unique case' statement. "/user/foo/project", line 7, for

This will print:

Error occurs on line 218
Found a unique error in line 218!
Error occurs on line 3
Found a unique error in line 3!
Error occurs on line 44
Found a unique error in line 44!
Error occurs on line 218
Not unique.
Error occurs on line 7
Found a unique error in line 7!
Error occurs on line 7
Not unique.

And I think this is correct. I had 218 double and 7 triple, and it found them both.

I only replaced your string which was missing the quotes with a filehandle loop to test it on multiple lines. I also fixed your regex that was missing the word line, but that was not even needed for this particular error message.

share|improve this answer
    
So, the way I guess I am thinking of the word unique, is that the first occurrence of the error is unique but every one after that is not. So, I would want to add the first occurrence to the list, and use that list as a reference for whether or not I've already seen it. It seems like in this implementation it works in post which wouldn't work too easily w/the current code I have. My code works "in-place" or present time, i.e. when it finds an error it prints out all the information about it and doesn't store anything. – Scott James Walter May 22 '13 at 16:30
    
I'm not sure I understood that. – simbabque May 22 '13 at 16:39
    
I scan through a log for errors. At each error I grab the line number the error occurred. If that line number isn't in my array of line numbers then it's unique. If it is, then it isn't unique. I do various operations on the line number if it is unique when I find it (present time); that last bit isn't really important. – Scott James Walter May 22 '13 at 16:44
    
I updated my code to what I think you are trying to do. Just disregard how often you have seen something. – simbabque May 22 '13 at 16:58
1  
Oh! That makes perfect sense! Thanks for explaining that! I hope this helps out other people in my situation if they stumble across this. – Scott James Walter May 22 '13 at 19:16

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