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I am a little confused as to when things become detached and the scope of the persistence context. Are my entities only "managed" within each method that roo generates? I ask because I have read that calling refresh() on a detached instance should throw an exception, but then I call refresh on my entity without merging it first I dont seem to get an error...

Could someone explain the Roo code in terms of how long the entity manager lives and when objects become managed and detached in the individual merge, persist, remove methods...

// WARNING: DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE. THIS FILE IS MANAGED BY SPRING ROO.
// You may push code into the target .java compilation unit if you wish to edit any member(s).


import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.util.List;
import javax.persistence.EntityManager;
import javax.persistence.PersistenceContext;
import org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional;

privileged aspect AdminDirectRole_Roo_Jpa_ActiveRecord {

    @PersistenceContext
    transient EntityManager AdminDirectRole.entityManager;

    public static final EntityManager AdminDirectRole.entityManager() {
        EntityManager em = new AdminDirectRole().entityManager;
        if (em == null) throw new IllegalStateException("Entity manager has not been injected (is the Spring Aspects JAR configured as an AJC/AJDT aspects library?)");
        return em;
    }

    public static long AdminDirectRole.countAdminDirectRoles() {
        return entityManager().createQuery("SELECT COUNT(o) FROM AdminDirectRole o", Long.class).getSingleResult();
    }

    public static List<AdminDirectRole> AdminDirectRole.findAllAdminDirectRoles() {
        return entityManager().createQuery("SELECT o FROM AdminDirectRole o", AdminDirectRole.class).getResultList();
    }

    public static AdminDirectRole AdminDirectRole.findAdminDirectRole(BigDecimal id) {
        if (id == null) return null;
        return entityManager().find(AdminDirectRole.class, id);
    }

    public static List<AdminDirectRole> AdminDirectRole.findAdminDirectRoleEntries(int firstResult, int maxResults) {
        return entityManager().createQuery("SELECT o FROM AdminDirectRole o", AdminDirectRole.class).setFirstResult(firstResult).setMaxResults(maxResults).getResultList();
    }

    @Transactional
    public void AdminDirectRole.persist() {
        if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager();
        this.entityManager.persist(this);
    }

    @Transactional
    public void AdminDirectRole.remove() {
        if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager();
        if (this.entityManager.contains(this)) {
            this.entityManager.remove(this);
        } else {
            AdminDirectRole attached = AdminDirectRole.findAdminDirectRole(this.id);
            this.entityManager.remove(attached);
        }
    }

    @Transactional
    public void AdminDirectRole.flush() {
        if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager();
        this.entityManager.flush();
    }

    @Transactional
    public void AdminDirectRole.clear() {
        if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager();
        this.entityManager.clear();
    }

    @Transactional
    public AdminDirectRole AdminDirectRole.merge() {
        if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager();
        AdminDirectRole merged = this.entityManager.merge(this);
        this.entityManager.flush();
        return merged;
    }

}

Any advice appreciated. I created this method expecting it to fail due to me not merging the entity into any persistence context, and no exception was raised?

@Transactional
    public void refresh() {
        if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager();
        entityManager.refresh(this);
    }
share|improve this question
    
How do you know the object is detached? – Taylor May 22 '13 at 16:26
    
actually starting to see exceptions now Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Can not refresh not managed object: AdminDirectRole[id=2,roleCode=ADMS_USER,roleName=ADMS User]. – smackenzie May 22 '13 at 16:46
    
Should I be doing this: @Transactional public AdminDirectRole refresh() { if (this.entityManager == null) this.entityManager = entityManager(); AdminDirectRole refreshed = this.entityManager.merge(this); entityManager.refresh(refreshed); return refreshed; } – smackenzie May 22 '13 at 16:47

The persistence context is by default bound to the transaction. I'm assuming that whatever code retrieves an instance of AdminDirectRole and calls the refresh method is wrapped with @Transactional? In other words:

//Will not throw an exception
@Transactional
public void foo(AdminDirectRole detached) {
  detached.merge();
  detached.refresh();
}

//Will throw an exception unless whatever is calling bar() has an @Transactional annotation (or whatever is calling whatever is calling bar and so on)
public void bar(AdminDirectRole detached) {
  detached.merge();
  detached.refresh();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, the first was throwing an exception. I have to merge it into the context before I refresh in the first method or I get a not managed exception. I am using @Transactional. – smackenzie May 22 '13 at 20:39
    
....to add I am not doing the Find ... with Find in the transaction you are likely already managed. I have to merge to avoid exception when I refresh. Not sure why you would want to find before you refresh...is there no point in refreshing if you do a fresh find? – smackenzie May 22 '13 at 20:45
    
It was just a simple example, I'll update to be more realistic. To be clear, there is never any reason you should have to do a refresh. If you are not using the default flush mode (e.g. only on commit or manual) then you may have to refresh. If you're using native statements you may have to refresh. Finally, if your database is using a READ_COMMITTED or lower isolation level you may have to refresh although I would question a design that relied on that kind of refresh. – Pace May 22 '13 at 20:59
    
Hi, in JSF we have session scope beans and some entities are created at session start, and as JPA CRUD operations are performed, we are adding and removing entities from collections in memory and then merging the changes. But if other users are making changes to those entities, then we need to periodically refresh I would have thought, or our session based entities will not be representative of the database. At least that's what I thought. – smackenzie May 22 '13 at 21:23
    
Are you saying that your JPA EntityManager lasts multiple web requests and transactions? If so then it makes sense you might want to refresh some things at the beginning of each request. If not, then there is no way you can guarantee you are working with the latest object. Someone can always update the object between your refresh and when you actually read the properties. If you must guarantee that then you would have to use pessimistic locking but typically applications can get away without that guarantee. – Pace May 22 '13 at 21:34

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