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I am trying to do something like this:

SELECT * FROM 
(SUBQUERY A) A 
JOIN (SUBQUERY B) B 
ON A.FIELD = B.FIELD

Individually, A runs really fast (about 5 seconds) and B runs in about 15 -20 seconds. But when I try to make this join, it just take several minutes to run. I know that query runs B for each line of A. Those subquerys involves very big tables, but return a small quantity of registers.

I want to know a way to force A and B run individually, then buffer the results and finally run the join query just in the results

Thanks!

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1  
There is a way; it is called temporary tables. I would first investigate if the statistics are up-to-date on the underlying tables. It sounds like the optimizer is making poor choices. –  Gordon Linoff May 22 '13 at 16:50
    
Thanks for formating the text! I have no permission to create tables or write in the database. I am just making reports here... It would be greate if there is a way to force subquerys to run first, diretcly from the query. –  user2410424 May 22 '13 at 16:58
    
What's the relationship between the results generated in subqueries a and b - one-to-one, one-to-many or many-to-many? –  Mark Bannister May 22 '13 at 17:09
    
Have you tried using a no_merge hint in the outer query? –  Mark Bannister May 22 '13 at 17:12
    
I would avoid temporary tables for something as simple as this. Half the time it's easier and faster to let the optimizer make its own temporary tables when required, and it'll perform better as well. –  Jeffrey Kemp May 23 '13 at 2:48

2 Answers 2

you can use with clause -

with a as ( subquery a),
b as (subquery B)
SELECT * FROM  A JOIN B 
ON A.FIELD = B.FIELD
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I've found this usually works, for now - but I'm not sure if future enhancements to the CBO may make this advice obsolete. –  Jeffrey Kemp May 23 '13 at 2:49

You may get what you need by using the NO_MERGE hint:

SELECT * FROM 
(SELECT /*+NO_MERGE*/ ... FROM SUBQUERY A) A 
JOIN (SELECT /*+NO_MERGE*/ ... FROM SUBQUERY B) B 
ON A.FIELD = B.FIELD
share|improve this answer
1  
and then I read the comments and see Mark has already suggested this... –  Jeffrey Kemp May 23 '13 at 2:47

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