Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

begin

          Input: n (pos. Integer)
          Output: y (pos. Integer)
          Other: x, z (pos. Integer)
                y := 0;
                x :=0;

                while x < n do
                      y := y + 1;
                      z := 0;
                      while z < 4 do
                          x := x + 1;
                          z := z + 1;
                      end;
                      for (i=0;i<2;i++){ 
                          x=x-1;
                      }
                End;

How is this done? I know that when there is a for loop it's O(N) and when there is a while it's O(log N) . I would appreciate the help :)

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
I think it's still O(N), because your inner loops always loop a constant number of times. You could unroll the loops (replace the code with the assignment statements repeated 4 and 2 times respectively) without fundamentally changing anything. I could be wrong though - it's been a couple of decades. – Dan Pichelman May 22 '13 at 19:07
    
I checked to see if it was april 1st or not. Since it's not, the type of loop has very little to do with whether it's O(N) or O(log N) etc. And yes, this is O(N). – Foon May 22 '13 at 19:16
1  
Also, what kind of unholy blend of pascal-ish and c-ish formatting/declarations is that pseudocode supposed to represent? – Foon May 22 '13 at 19:21
    
Your statement about O(N) and O(log N) are completely wrong. The complexity of a loop depends on what that loop does, not what type of loop it is. – templatetypedef May 22 '13 at 22:59

A good way to do this is to determine how many times the outer loop executes and how much work it does per iteration.

The body of the loop is the following:

            y := y + 1;
            z := 0;
            while z < 4 do
                  x := x + 1;
                  z := z + 1;
            end;
            for (i=0;i<2;i++){ 
                     x=x-1;
            }

This first line does O(1) work, as does the second. The next part of the logic is a loop that runs four times, each iteration doing O(1) work. Accordingly, this inner loop does O(1) work as well. Finally, the remaining loop does O(1) work. Consequently, each iteration of the loop does O(1) work.

So how many times does the outer loop execute? Well, the loop is

while x < n do

x starts at zero, and note that on each iteration the loop increments x four times and decrements x twice. Consequently, on each iteration of the loop, x increases by two. Therefore, the number of loop iterations is roughly n / 2 = O(n).

Since the loop runs O(n) times and does O(1) work per iteration, the total work done here is O(n).

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter- Can you please explain what's wrong with this answer? To the best of my knowledge, this is correct, and if it's wrong I'd be happy to update it. – templatetypedef May 22 '13 at 19:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.