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I was trying out a program and compiling and running it with GCC but it throws error that it cannot be run in dos mode. Here is my code

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{ 
    ifstream is; 
    is.open("text1.txt",ios::binary);
    ofstream outfile;
    outfile.open("text2.txt",ios::binary);
    char ch; 
    while (is.get(ch)) 
    { 
        outfile.put(ch);
        cout << ch;  //this shows
    }
    is.close();
    outfile.close();
    getchar();
    return 0; 
}

But this code works perfectly fine in Visual Studio. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Not sure if you are using native gcc or cygwin but in case is the later I don't think conio.h would be available –  Pedrom May 22 '13 at 19:35
    
You need to change the SUBSYSTEM to CONSOLE. BINEDIT.EXE used to be able to do this when I last still paid attention to windows. <jk/> Hint It's a linker setting –  sehe May 22 '13 at 19:48
    
i am using native gcc –  Saksham May 22 '13 at 19:48
    
Does the error message actually say "DOS mode"? That would imply that you're trying to invoke it with the 16-bit command.com shell (not the normal Windows Command Prompt from cmd.exe). Or maybe you're trying to run it from some DOS boot disk? –  jamesdlin May 22 '13 at 19:54
1  
@Saksham every NT program has a small DOS program in the first 100 bytes that outputs that string and then exits, this can happen for 2 reasons, either you're actually trying to run it from something that emulates DOS, or because the signature of the executable is wrong, can you open it in a hexadecimal editor and tell us what the values of the first 4 bytes are, they should be PE00 for a NT executable and MZ something for a dos program' –  Radu Chivu May 22 '13 at 21:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm supposing there's a gcc compile option for to run as a console command. See -mconsole here: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/i386-and-x86_002d64-Windows-Options.html

share|improve this answer

If you want to do this more cross-platform friendly you could remove the line

#include<conio.h>

and change getch() for getchar()

EDIT: So it would look like this:

 #include<fstream>
 using namespace std;
 int main(int argc, char *argv[])
 {
     ifstream is;
     is.open("text1.txt",ios::binary);
     ofstream outfile;
     outfile.open("text2.txt",ios::binary);
     char ch;
     while (is.get(ch))
     {
         outfile.put(ch);
         cout << ch;  //this shows
     }
     is.close();
     outfile.close();
     getchar();
     return 0;
 } 
share|improve this answer
    
point taken. I'm a newbie. But what's the solution –  Saksham May 22 '13 at 19:43
    
@Saksham Not a problem, we all are newbies :) I updated my answer with the code –  Pedrom May 22 '13 at 19:51
    
Sorry but this wont solve the problem. Its a suggestiona and not the solution –  Saksham May 22 '13 at 19:52
    
@Saksham Then you can you try to explain a bit more what's the problem? Because it is running on my setup –  Pedrom May 22 '13 at 19:56
    
If it's throwing an error that says, it "cannot be run in DOS mode" then it's not a cross-platform file include issue or something like that. The executable being generated by the linker is specific to Windows. Pedrom, what gcc compile options are you using and what environment (cygwin or native)? –  lurker May 22 '13 at 20:36

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