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Lately I have been trying to create my own PHP framework, just to learn from it (As we may look into some bigger and more robust framework for production). One design concept I currently have, is that most core classes mainly work on static functions within classes.

Now a few days ago, I've seen a few articles about "Static methods are death to testability". This concerned me as.. yeah.. my classes contain mostly static methods.. The main reason I was using static methods is that a lot of classes would never need more than one instance, and static methods are easy to approach in the global scope. Now I'm aware that static methods aren't actually the best way to do things, I'm looking for a better alternative.

Imagine the following code to get a config item:

$testcfg = Config::get("test"); // Gets config from "test"
echo $testcfg->foo; // Would output what "foo" contains ofcourse.

/*
 * We cache the newly created instance of the "test" config,
 * so if we need to use it again anywhere in the application,
 * the Config::get() method simply returns that instance.
 */

This is an example of what I currently have. But according to some articles, this is bad.
Now, I could do this the way how, for example, CodeIgniter does this, using:

$testcfg = $this->config->get("test");
echo $testcfg->foo;

Personally, I find this harder to read. That's why I would prefer another way.

So in short, I guess I need a better approach to my classes. I would not want more than one instance to the config class, maintain readability and have easy access to the class. Any ideas?

Note that I'm looking for some best practice or something including a code sample, not some random ideas. Also, if I'm bound to a $this->class->method style pattern, then would I implement this efficiently?

share|improve this question
    
Remi: @Elias said it all in his answer, but for your ->get() part... have you considered implementing the ArrayAccess interface, which would then allow you to use your class as if it was an array? –  Sébastien Renauld May 22 '13 at 20:20
    
@SébastienRenauld, actually not. I've read a little about it a few days ago but I guess I should see and try how it works. If you could give me a quick summary of it, what exactly does it do? –  RemiDG May 22 '13 at 20:27
    
@Remi-X: Pretty easy: class Foo implements ArrayAccess, and read the docs of the interface. Everything listed in the interface must be implemented in the class, and you're good to go –  Elias Van Ootegem May 22 '13 at 20:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In response to Sébastien Renauld's comments: here's an article on DI and IoC with some examples, and a few extra words on the Hollywood principle (quite important when working on a framework).

Saying your classes won't ever need more than a single instance doesn't mean that statics are a must. Far from it, actually. If you browse this site, and read through PHP questions that deal with the singleton "pattern", you'll soon find out why singletons are a bit of a no-no.

I won't go into the details, but testing and singletons don't mix. Dependency injection is definitely worth a closer look. I'll leave it at that for now.

To answer your question:
Your exaple (Config::get('test')) implies you have a static property in the Config class somewhere. Now if you've done this, as you say, to facilitate access to given data, imagine what a nightmare it would be to debug your code, if that value were to change somewhere... It's a static, so change it once, and it's changed everywhere. Finding out where it was changed might be harder than you anticipated. Even so, that's nothing compared to the issues someone who uses your code will have in the same situation.
And yet, the real problems will only start when that person using your code wants to test whatever it is he/she made: If you want to have access to an instance in a given object, that has been instantiated in some class, there are plenty of ways to do so (especially in a framework):

class Application
{//base class of your framework
    private $defaulDB = null;
    public $env = null;
    public function __construct($env = 'test')
    {
        $this->env = $end;
    }
    private function connectDB(PDO $connection = null)
    {
        if ($connection === null)
        {
            $connection = new PDO();//you know the deal...
        }
        $this->defaultDB = $connection;
    }
    public function getDB(PDO $conn = null)
    {//get connection
        if ($this->defaultDB === null)
        {
            $this->connectDB($conn);
        }
        return $this->defaultDB;
    }
    public function registerController(MyConstroller $controller)
    {//<== magic!
         $controller->registerApplication($this);
         return $this;
    }
}

As you can see, the Application class has a method that passes the Application instance to your controller, or whatever part of your framework you want to grant access to scope of the Application class.
Note that I've declared the defaultDB property as a private property, so I'm using a getter. I can, if I wanted to, pass a connection to that getter. There's a lot more you can do with that connection, of course, but I can't be bothered writing a full framework to show you everything you can do here :).

Basically, all your controllers will extend the MyController class, which could be an abstract class that looks like this:

abstract class MyController
{
    private $app = null;
    protected $db = null;
    public function __construct(Application $app = null)
    {
        if ($app !== null)
        {
            return $this->registerApplication($app);
        }
    }
    public function registerApplication(Application $app)
    {
        $this->app = $app;
        return $this;
    }
    public function getApplication()
    {
        return $this->app;
    }
}

So in your code, you can easily do something along the lines of:

$controller = new MyController($this);//assuming the instance is created in the Application class
$controller = new MyController();
$controller->registerApplication($appInstance);

In both cases, you can get that single DB instance like so:

$controller->getApplication()->getDB();

You can test your framework with easily by passing a different DB connection to the getDB method, if the defaultDB property hasn't been set in this case. With some extra work you can register multiple DB connections at the same time and access those at will, too:

$controller->getApplication->getDB(new PDO());//pass test connection here...

This is, by no means, the full explanation, but I wanted to get this answer in quite quickly before you end up with a huge static (and thus useless) codebase.

In response to comments from OP:

On how I'd tackle the Config class. Honestly, I'd pretty much do the same thing as I'd do with the defaultDB property as shown above. But I'd probably allow for more targeted control on what class gets access to what part of the config:

class Application
{
    private $config = null;
    public function __construct($env = 'test', $config = null)
    {//get default config path or use path passed as argument
        $this->config = new Config(parse_ini_file($config));
    }
    public function registerController(MyController $controller)
    {
        $controller->setApplication($this);
    }
    public function registerDB(MyDB $wrapper, $connect = true)
    {//assume MyDB is a wrapper class, that gets the connection data from the config
        $wrapper->setConfig(new Config($this->config->getSection('DB')));
        $this->defaultDB = $wrapper;
        return $this;
    }
}

class MyController
{
    private $app = null;
    public function getApplication()
    {
        return $this->app;
    }
    public function setApplication(Application $app)
    {
        $this->app = $app;
        return $this;
    }
    //Optional:
    public function getConfig()
    {
        return $this->app->getConfig();
    }
    public function getDB()
    {
        return $this->app->getDB();
    }
}

Those last two methods aren't really required, you could just as well write something like:

$controller->getApplication()->getConfig();

Again, this snippet is all a bit messy and incomplete, but it does go to show you that you can "expose" certain properties of one class, by passing a reference to that class to another. Even if the properties are private, you can use getters to access them all the same. You can also use various register-methods to control what it is the registered object is allowed to see, as I've done with the DB-wrapper in my snippet. A DB class shouldn't deal with viewscripts and namespaces, or autoloaders. That's why I'm only registering the DB section of the config.

Basically, a lot of your main components will end up sharing a number of methods. In other words, they'll end up implementing a given interface. For each main component (assuming the classic MVC pattern), you'll have one abstract base-class, and an inheritance chain of 1 or 2 levels of child classes: Abstract Controller > DefaultController > ProjectSpecificController.
At the same time, all of these classes will probably expect another instance to be passed to them when constructed. Just look at the index.php of any ZendFW project:

$application = new Zend_Application(APPLICATION_ENV);
$application->bootstrap()->run();

That's all you can see, but inside the application, all other classes are being instantiated. That's why you can access neigh on everything from anywhere: all classes have been instantiated inside another class along these lines:

public function initController(Request $request)
{
    $this->currentController = $request->getController();
    $this->currentController = new $this->currentController($this);
    return $this->currentController->init($request)
                                   ->{$request->getAction().'Action'}();
}

By passing $this to the constructor of a controller class, that class can use various getters and setters to get to whatever it needs... Look at the examples above, it could use getDB, or getConfig and use that data if that's what it needs.
That's how most frameworks I've tinkered or worked with function: The application is kicks into action and determines what needs to be done. That's the Hollywood-principle, or Inversion of Control: the Application is started, and the application determines what classes it needs when. In the link I provided I believe this is compared to a store creating its own customers: the store is built, and decides what it wants to sell. In order to sell it, it will create the clients it wants, and provide them with the means they need to purchase the goods...

And, before I forget: Yes, all this can be done without a single static variable, let alone function, coming into play. I've built my own framework, and I've never felt there was no other way than to "go static". I did use the Factory pattern at first, but ditched it pretty quickly.
IMHO, a good framework is modular: you should be able to use bits of it (like Symfony's components), without issues. Using the Factory pattern makes you assume too much. You assume class X will be available, which isn't a given.
Registering those classes that are available makes for far more portable components. Consider this:

class AssumeFactory
{
    private $db = null;
    public function getDB(PDO $db = null)
    {
        if ($db === null)
        {
            $config = Factory::getConfig();//assumes Config class
            $db = new PDO($config->getDBString());
        }
        $this->db = $db;
        return $this->db;
    }
}

As opposed to:

class RegisteredApplication
{//assume this is registered to current Application
    public function getDB(PDO $fallback = null, $setToApplication = false)
    {
        if ($this->getApplication()->getDB() === null)
        {//defensive
            if ($setToApplication === true && $fallback !== null)
            {
                $this->getApplication()->setDB($fallback);
                return $fallback;//this is current connection
            }
            if ($fallback === null && $this->getApplication()->getConfig() !== null)
            {//if DB is not set @app, check config:
                $fallback = $this->getApplication()->getConfig()->getSection('DB');
                $fallback = new PDO($fallback->connString, $fallback->user, $fallback->pass);
                return $fallback;
            }
            throw new RuntimeException('No DB connection set @app, no fallback');
        }
        if ($setToApplication === true && $fallback !== null)
        {
            $this->getApplication()->setDB($fallback);
        }
        return $this->getApplication()->getDB();
    }
}

Though the latter version is slightly more work to write, it's quite clear which of the two is the better bet. The first version just assumes too much, and doesn't allow for safety-nets. It's also quite dictatorial: suppose I've written a test, and I need the results to go to another DB. I therefore need to change the DB connection, for the entire application (user input, errors, stats... they're all likely to be stored in a DB).
For those two reasons alone, the second snippet is the better candidate: I can pass another DB connection, that overwrites the application default, or, if I don't want to do that, I can either use the default connection, or attempt to create the default connection. Store the connection I just made, or not... the choice is entirely mine. If nothing works, I just get a RuntimeException thrown at me, but that's not the point.

share|improve this answer
1  
This deserves more +1. Might be worth mentioning IoC along with DI, to simplify testing while still possibly allowing singleton-esque approaches. –  Sébastien Renauld May 22 '13 at 20:19
    
Awesome answer. Could you just clarify one thing in your answer? I got a slight idea of how I would inject my own class into the controller (so being able to do $this->class->method()), but I would like to see yours too. Also, as you state you wanted to get the answer in quickly, I would love seeing the things you left out now :P –  RemiDG May 22 '13 at 21:06
    
@Remi-X: I wouldn't inject my object into a controller class, I'd extend the framework's controller class, and use that as my controller. AFAIK, that's how most frameworks work. That way, you'd only have to do $this->method() where $this is class MyCustomController extends MyController. If you pass that object to a method or function that uses typehinting, it'll accept the object as an instance of MyController, as well as an instance of MyCustomController –  Elias Van Ootegem May 22 '13 at 21:13
    
@Remi-X: Things I've left out are namespace, Inversion of Control, automated testing and Dependency Injection, and some more elaborate code examples. All of the things I can tell you about this have all been written about on the net, with tons of examples. Don't take this the wrong way, but please, google the afore mentioned terms –  Elias Van Ootegem May 22 '13 at 21:15
    
@EliasVanOotegem I actually meant a class like the config class, not the extension on the base controller. And ofcourse I've googled around. It just sounded like you had some more to tell, but left it out at the moment of writing to get the answer more quickly done. –  RemiDG May 22 '13 at 21:32

Magic methods would help you: see the examples about __get() and __set()

You should also take a look at namespaces: it may help you to get rid of some classes with static methods only.

share|improve this answer
1  
Do you have any idea how inefficient those magic methods are? –  Sébastien Renauld May 22 '13 at 20:19
    
@SébastienRenauld well, it's a feature, not a hack. Therefore I expect the efficiency to be fair and improving in time. –  Jan Turoň May 22 '13 at 20:27
2  
@JanTuroň: I use the methods native to PHP. However, some of them encourage something called slacking. Using _call, for example, implies that you do not know the interface exposed by your class. That's not a feature - that's a bug sitting in the chair in front of the computer, and I know very few other languages that allow you to go with something like that. Because it exists doesn't mean it should be used. There are cases where __call is handy, but they're few and (very) far between. –  Sébastien Renauld May 22 '13 at 20:51
1  
@JanTuroň: It's not macho - your reasoning is flawed. It's not because PHP is slow (hint: all interpreted languages are) that it gives you the magical incentive to make it slower. There is nothing macho about saying "This version takes 3 extra lookups to do the same thing" - it's called performance analysis. If that reasoning was correct, I'd slack very hard in C too, as it's slower than ASM, which itself is slower than machine code. What is that kind of reasoning? –  Sébastien Renauld May 22 '13 at 21:19
1  
@EliasVanOotegem: You're right. Thanks for the comment (though I wasn't about the +1). Also, you know what I meant by interpreted :-P the conversion happens, even just once if APC is on. –  Sébastien Renauld May 22 '13 at 21:32

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